Volume pot question

Discussion in 'Historics & Reissues' started by flimz, Aug 15, 2017.

  1. flimz

    flimz Senior Member

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    Update...I was preparing to remove the harness and checked the connections. It wasn't making good contact in a few spots.
    So I cleaned re-soldered everything. Got some new tips for my iron.
    Turns out my pots weren't damaged at all. Now all is right again and it sounds great!
     
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  2. jamman

    jamman Premium Member

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    That's Good news ,Congrats , sounds as if you had a cold solder joint ,somewhere in the chain ... :cheers:
     
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  3. viking20

    viking20 Senior Member

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    Most of the time people blame crappy cheap pots for failures , its actually caused by too much heat. The pot will either misbehave before you get a chance to try it out , or much sooner than they should last.
    Its much better for the pots to remove the back casing , and put a decent solder blob on there , away from the pot internals. It only takes a few seconds to remove the casing.
    Then when the pre-tinned leads are attached , it will only take a second to solder it to the casing.
    When soldering caps and resistors inside amps its common to use tweezer looking heatsinks , or alligator clips , to protect the part being soldered in. Not so easy with pots , the casing on the pot is one giant heat sink...!
     
  4. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    Those pots are not meant to have the back casing removed. They can be cleaned and serviced without dissembling them. They should also be installed and soldered to without removing the casing. Those metal tabs are not able to withstand repeated bending back and forth and will break and then the pot shafts will become loose, at best, or push through the back of the pot from the front of the guitar, at worst. In the case of the specific pots the OP has, they are shaft-through and removing the C clip retainers and washers is also required to remove the back and is even more of a problem.

    If you have to disassemble a pot to install it without damaging it, your soldering technique needs changing. That's not how they were designed and it can cause harm.
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2017
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  5. jamman

    jamman Premium Member

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    Agree ^^^^^
    I wrote about removing the casing of the pot , only when there is so much solder on it , It would be a consideration for someone who needs to take a lot of time De-soldering the excess solder. Those with patients and some skill don't have to . But that ,imo takes practice ... and time , correct tools . A De-soldering braid is needed .
    It's not the "normal" way to solder a guitars electronics . Done improperly , might cause more problems then you started with ...

    But , if you're leaning ,how to solder . removing the case to remove the solder . might save you from having to buy more pots ... Really cheap pots can be more of a challenge to solder then a decent pot because of what they are made from . IMO , part of learning to solder is ,when you're done , testing the pot to see if it still works . If it don't ,,, You try some more ...
     
  6. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    That stuff is the jam, Jamman! Nothing like a hot iron and some high quality copper braid to clean off old solder and gunk. Some things a solder sucker just can't do.
     
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