Value of Relicing, Heavy Relicing, vs. Normal Wear and Tear

Discussion in 'The Custom Shop' started by rednefceleb, Dec 31, 2017.

  1. rednefceleb

    rednefceleb Premium Member

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    I think Roy would play the guitar.
     
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  2. rednefceleb

    rednefceleb Premium Member

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    No. Some of them like a '59 Paul are very nice. The '56 Strats. Subtle ageing, I do like.
     
  3. LenPaul

    LenPaul Premium Member

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    Looks aren't everything, I would, & have bought a couple Fender heavy relics just because they were the nicest sounding
    & playing guitars I'd run across in a long while, even if I did think they looked like shyte, all I see when I play is the top of their bouts.:)
     
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  4. Dino

    Dino Senior Member

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    Why judge?
    I like shiny new guitars as much as everyone else but I also like (and appreciate) a well done relic finish. It is indeed an art form. And to say that someone “didn’t earn it” kinda shows a lack of knowledge in the lacquers used on vintage instruments versus the plasticized lacquers used on more modern finishes. Today’s finishes just typically don’t show much age no matter how long you play them. Of course there are exceptions.
     
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  5. rednefceleb

    rednefceleb Premium Member

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    You're right. There is an '82 G & L SC-3 in black w/ 22 fret maple. This thing is the perfect natural age. The neck has the wear spots/divets in the right places and the wood shows thru where the player rested his arm on the upper bout. Subtle stuff like that is better than a new guitar. You <know> that she's reliable. I dislike the 'tore-up' look, or the extent that Rory extent of relicing. I respect Rory and his guitar just like I do SRV. These guys beat their into submission. I wish that 'poly' was not used on any guitar. Poly guitars/necks are all wrapped up forever. Never broken in.:D
     
  6. oldflame

    oldflame Senior Member

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    Really don't see what difference it makes. As long as the guitar is a good one.
     
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  7. oldflame

    oldflame Senior Member

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    Personally, I think the Nash relic jobs I've seen on Gibson's are totally unconvincing compared to the guys who really know how to do the job properly. His Fender work seems a tad better. Only a tad mind you.
     
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  8. rednefceleb

    rednefceleb Premium Member

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    Yes, weird checking.:D
     
  9. waxout

    waxout Junior Member

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    Once I though relicing was really stupid. Then after many instances actually selling guitars that were absolutely flawless, because I rarely played them, and I NEVER gigged them, because I could not bear the thought of the first scratch, or the finish losing some gloss due to my sweat. Because I got sick of spending more time polishing than playing, the complete wipe down after every handling. A relic is great, because it's usually a well made guitar, and I'm not terrified of a scratch or a bump. My guitars are rode hard and put away wet. Tarnish on the bridge or pickups, who cares? Tarnish on the strings, replace 'em. My only issue with relics is some of the ridiculous pricing.
     
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  10. Guitar Geordie

    Guitar Geordie Junior Member

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    An 'aged by use' guitar depends very much on the player. The wear on the neck or the body blemishes may be unsightly but they reflect your playing experience and bring back memories. Unless it's an instrument that has some connection to say, a respected previous owner, I would prefer to 'age' my own.
     
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  11. rednefceleb

    rednefceleb Premium Member

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    There's a good example of natural wear on a G&L SC-
    Honestly to me poly is a crime. :D
     
  12. Cygnus X-1

    Cygnus X-1 Senior Member

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    as the owner of a reliced guitar (see my avatar pic) I will say that in this case I really wanted a JH Iron Cross model and not having the relicing on the front would kind of defeat the purpose. (I'm pretty sure James had the wear added so I'm not sure who is worse here- him or me lol). In retrospect, I don't love the "wear" on the back of the neck but the front looks cool. But I wouldn't have a new guitar aged to look worn in if I didn't cause the wear myself.
     
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  13. Jymbopalyse

    Jymbopalyse Senior Member

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    This makes about as much sense as purchasing a new car . . . and antiquing it.

    Or buying new denim jeans and making holes in them before you even wear them once.


    You want your guitar to look road worn. Take it out of the fuckin case and play it once in a while.
     
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  14. rednefceleb

    rednefceleb Premium Member

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    On Reverb today Fender has a E.C. 'Brownie' Strat for a mere $13,999.00! That's thirteen nine K. This is a perfect example of a major guitar company profiteering. If I told ANYBODY that I paid that much for a somewhat beaten <new> ((not a 1958 or whatever), I would lose the small quantity of respect that my fellows have for me. :). Admittedly, there are some nice '59 Paul Custom Shops. But they look old... The SRV is about my limit. They are much, much, less expensive. I woke up grumpy! :)
     
  15. Blue Blood

    Blue Blood Senior Member

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    Spot on.
    I only own one Les Paul, & it's a lemon/unburst of the historic variant.
    My son noted, "dada, your guitar looks like Jimmys" (We were watching 'It might get loud'... ramble on scene).
    I thought "damn, I'm a faker!"
     
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  16. freebyrd 69

    freebyrd 69 Premium Member

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    A major company making profits.......damn, what's next?
     
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  17. rednefceleb

    rednefceleb Premium Member

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  18. ClashCityRocker

    ClashCityRocker Senior Member

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    I’m neutral on the argument. I’ve owned both. What I’m interested to see is how these moderately and heavily relic’d guitars will age over the years. For example, how will a really nice Murphy or Custom Shop continue to age? Obviously some of these are going to stay indoors and at home. But, for relics that are being gigged and going on the road, what will they look like 20 years from now? Will different patterns of checking occur between the “traditional looking” lines carved at Gibson? Will it look good or will you be able to distinguish what was man made and what was caused by time? Will you be able to notice that the razor checked lines are deeper than the actual weather checked lines? I guess guitars that were aged via hot/cold treatments will not differ all that much. Will the abuse of the road show exponentially on the guitar since it was already checked, oxidized, etc, to the point that the finish is just flaking off in areas.

    And then how will this affect perceived value down the road? Buying a new relic’d guitar right now is cool and interesting for some but when someone walks into a guitar store in 20 years and see’s a great looking Les Paul and then they’re told it was originally a Custom Shop Relic, will it mean anything? Will it take away from what they thought it was when they saw it? I guess it’ll be as relative then as it is now? When your nephew finds your old beat up guitar and you tell him it was a relic from 30 years ago. I could be wrong but I can’t see that being half as cool as saying “it’s original”.

    Just a few things that I ponder on sometimes.
     
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  19. MooCheng

    MooCheng Senior Member

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    incredible when you think about it.....
    paying extra for something that looks knackered and on top of that, often not convincingly knackered
     
  20. edouglaspratt

    edouglaspratt Junior Member

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    So here's a question that goes beyond one's personal preference on reliced guitars: when a 2018 reliced "59" Les Paul becomes vintage in 30-plus years, what do you think its vintage value will be like?

    Doug
     
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