Useful method of learning the guitar neck notes

Discussion in 'Guitar Lessons' started by GuitarCrazzzy, May 5, 2010.

  1. GuitarCrazzzy

    GuitarCrazzzy Senior Member

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    Hi people :)

    Yesterday I was searching for a easy way to learn the notes on the guitar neck, below are the videos and I hope It helps all you beginners aswell as its helping me. :dude:


    Part 1
    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MuzB2_O8GGM]YouTube - Learn the notes on the guitar fretboard. Part 1 of 3[/ame]

    Part2
    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qnsL9DAuOSM&feature=related]YouTube - Learn the notes on the guitar fretboard. Part 2 of 3[/ame]

    Part3
    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EtrTeWrTZrM&feature=related]YouTube - Learn the notes on the guitar fretboard. Part 3 of 3[/ame]
     
    darkle, voices, jerryo and 5 others like this.
  2. Agave_Blue

    Agave_Blue Senior Member

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    Cool. Thanks. I've needed something like this.

    I had considered just brute-force rote memorization, but decided I'd learn "organically" instead - just play and watch and eventually you learn note names.

    This is better than either; kind of a little of both.
     
  3. GuitarCrazzzy

    GuitarCrazzzy Senior Member

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    Glad to help :)
     
  4. tintin

    tintin Senior Member

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    Thanks, although a bit late for me. I've learned the notes through idiotic, haphazard repetition and playing, mostly.
     
  5. AngryHatter

    AngryHatter Senior Member

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    :lol:


    Since I know the fifth fret of the first string is an 'A' (my middle finger), I also know my pinkie will hit the octave on the third string.
    I know my middle finger on the second string will be a fourth...and so on.

    I guess knowing all the notes on the 'E' led to knowing the rest.:hmm:
     
  6. Goostah

    Goostah Senior Member

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    Thanks posting.

    I too use the octave method to learn the notes. Not sure why the video suggests against it.
     
  7. SHADOWSHADY

    SHADOWSHADY Senior Member

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    I agree with this and your signature BEADGCF

    I am still learning but these two items help
     
  8. L60N

    L60N Senior Member

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    You will learn open notes pretty quickly, then from the third fret, whole steps each time:

    Low E -> G,A,B
    5th A -> C,D,E
    4th D -> F,G,A ala GABCDEFGA

    I forget the other 3 strings because all chord shapes are based off the top 3, to my mind anyway. ;)

    This I recommend as a possible starting point. :thumb:
     
  9. Quill

    Quill Senior Member

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    GuitarCrazzzy: great find.

    A suggestion? I love the start with C - that's what I did, and it's what I've suggested to other people. And it's really important to notice the quick comment the demonstrator makes: "without noticing a pattern". Of course we are going to notice a pattern developing - the geometry will emerge regardless - but he's rightly stressing the independent location of the notes - really important. It's not enough to understand where the notes are - there's no time to "understand", every time you want to play. Have to try to get it so we go straight there.

    But learning B right after C is sort of looking at it in terms of "what's right beside C" - ok, but still, B is then learned relative to the position of C, which seems to me to be against the idea. Might be better to go through the natural notes in a kind of cycle, and what better than following fourth root motion?

    That would make it this order: do C first, then F. After that, B. E next, then A. Follow with D, and finish up with G. And while you are doing that, another pattern will worm its way into your consciousness that will be useful in a different and additional way.

    Just a thought.
     
  10. lukemacauley

    lukemacauley Mac Guitars Premium Member

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    I know the top two strings (for power chords and barre chords) by:

    3 (G)ay (C)ats
    5 (A)ble(D)igits
    7 (B)eautiful (E)lephants
     
  11. huw

    huw V.I.P. Member

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    The octave method (which is very useful for conecting positions) can lead to knowing the octave shapes better than the actual notes.

    In other words, some folk stop before they've really finished - they can find all the F#s on the neck, by conecting the shapes, but they don't really know the F#s independantly.

    They could find that there's an F# at the 19th fret on the B string, but they don't know it without using the octave shapes to get there.

    That's not enough - like Quill says there isn't time to just understand. There isn't time (when playing) to go: F#, E string 14th fret, so D string 16th, so B string 19th. That's too long. The moment has passed.

    If you want an F#, you want it now, not when you've worked it out.
     
  12. Rock Johnson

    Rock Johnson Senior Member

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    That is exactly my problem with the octave method. I am at *exactly* the place you describe.

    I can quickly FIND any note on the fretboard, but I don't KNOW the notes on the 'board.
     
  13. huw

    huw V.I.P. Member

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    As am I, friend! As am I. :thumb:

    The reason I know that particular pitfall so well, is because it's one of the ones that I struggle with myself, constantly. :cool:

    My excuse (because of course, I have one... :naughty:) is that if I think about the notes at all when I'm playing, I tend to think in scale degrees, rather than note names. I'll be aiming for "b7 5 3 6 bend to b7" rather than (in A) "G E C# F# bend to G"

    Mea culpa... :)
     
  14. L60N

    L60N Senior Member

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    That first video is funny. Learn C... "boom there it is" :laugh2. gawd i really need to stop drunk posting. *burp*
     
  15. jerryo

    jerryo Senior Member

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    "without recognizing a pattern" the man sez...
     
  16. Quill

    Quill Senior Member

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    Yes. Of course there is a pattern, and of course, once we start to understand it, we all see that pattern, when we look at the neck. It's the "recognition" part that we all have to get past, or get through, or otherwise get around before you can really get to the notes.

    The pattern is obvious. But - in the old sense of that word, which refers to a barrier of some kind, an obstruction. That pattern is in your way. And by that, of course, I mean it's in our way - we all struggle with it. We have to stop recognizing it, and maybe even stop seeing it - and try to effortlessly know it.

    Yup. Me too. The problems that we can explain well are the ones we struggle with the most.

    We used to do these crazy random-note reading exercises in school. The notes would be selected so they with more-or-less within a given position on the neck (say, from A on the fifth fret, sixth string up to C on the eight fret, first string), they would each be given a quarter-note value, and there would be no particular melody to them, just jumping around all over the staff. And there's no point to it if you don't use a metronome: the idea is to move without hesitation from one note to the next, and even to be able to look ahead and sort out where you are going to go before you need to be there. Easy exercises would start with intervals of a second and a third, and the leaps would get progressively wider, up to two octaves, as they progressed in difficulty. The idea was to write out pages and pages of them, forget about them, and then sit down and sight-read through them. It helped many players quite a bit, others, not so much. I got tired of rinsing the blood out of my ears and nose, that would start to run out of my ears and nose, whenever I tried to do those exercises, which were incredibly hard for me, but maybe it'd be good to try them again.

    Good luck if you try this! If you never hear from me again, you'll know what happened.
     
  17. ReadingOwls

    ReadingOwls Senior Member

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    I sat down and played the note and figured it out! I done this for every day twice for a week and that was it for me.
     
  18. Agave_Blue

    Agave_Blue Senior Member

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    Learning is a funny thing. Books have been written about how people learn. And Adult Learning is a whole other field of study.

    What works for one of us might not work for another; to the complete mystification of both.

    So if this works for ANYBODY, that's a good thing right? If this "method" happens to fit someone's learning style, then so be it; whatever works.

    If you're VERY new to a guitar fretboard, this looks just plain over-whelming:

    [​IMG]

    Are there patterns there? Yeah, probably, but visually some people will see that and gag. Or walk away. What good is that?

    So if you don't have a preconcieved notion of how to "read" the fretboard and this "method" works for you, I say :thumb:
     
  19. hippie

    hippie Junior Member

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    it helped me lol iv been bangin cords for years and know some scales but never took the time to realy learn the neck . thanks man
     
  20. jerryo

    jerryo Senior Member

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    It should not be over whelming...its sort of like an electrical wiring diagram...

    just find the wires (or notes) you need :)
     

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