Two Pentatonic Pattern Realizations that Revolutionize playing Pentatonics Anywhere, Quickly

Discussion in 'Guitar Lessons' started by DW4LesPaul, Mar 1, 2018.

  1. DW4LesPaul

    DW4LesPaul Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,154
    Likes Received:
    234
    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2014
    OK, so the title is a little misleading in that you still have to know the note or key you want to play in, otherwise, it is a true title. These two go together and I recommend watching the Stitched method first, then the Steve Stine video, and it will just click.

    Basically, all you need to know is the 1st minor pentatonic position because All other positions are actually the 1st position in different parts of the fretboard, and they wrap around the fretboard. Magically, if yuo start the 1st position anywhere on the fretboard, you can see how the shape seems to change, but it is really just the 1st position wrapping around the fretboard.

    What does it mean? You DO NOT need to know any other shape but the first shape in order to play ALL shapes at will all over the fretboard.

    Ian Stitch: Will show you how the first position repeats on any key note. Watch his "part 2" also, which finishes explaining it.


    Steve Stine: Shows you how do don't need to know shapes at all, except how the pattern repeats to create all patterns:
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2018
    Nard, kiko, Eddie 70 and 3 others like this.
  2. spitfire

    spitfire Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,847
    Likes Received:
    2,073
    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2009
    I'm a big fan of the approach in the first video. It's much easier to memorize a small pattern and move it around. Keeping track of the root note of the scale or chord and then applying a small pattern referenced to it. It does require learning the notes on the fret board. But, that's a really important thing to do anyway.

    Something similar is the "frying pan" pattern


    While I'm not as big a fan of the larger pattern described in the 2nd video. I like how he points out the way that all these are really one pattern just rolling or wrapping around the neck.

    Regardless of the pattern, if you can relate it to a reference note (like the root), you're never lost.

    Bottom line, all of these visualization techniques are helpful. And the more you learn, the more it all ties together. While ultimately it is sound that matters, as we all know the fret board is pretty complicated, so we need some way to approach the instrument. Guitars are great for patterns that make it super easy to change keys. But the trade off is keeping track of just where the heck you are.

    Thanks to the OP for the links.
     
    Eddie 70 likes this.
  3. Thumpalumpacus

    Thumpalumpacus Senior Member

    Messages:
    76,014
    Likes Received:
    186,252
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Keeping track of where you are requires ears. Visual patterns are great for getting the frets under your fingers, but they're also a great way to slap spackle over music.

    Learn the patterns, and then more importantly, learn how they work with what's going on underneath. Identify chord-tones inside those scales, and learn how to resolve your melodies to them.
     
    Dave J and bulletproof like this.
  4. DW4LesPaul

    DW4LesPaul Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,154
    Likes Received:
    234
    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2014
    [/QUOTE]

    Yeah the second video is just explaining that you can always find your shape--as long as you now them, be remembering that there are always 3 groups of 3 and two groups of 4. So if you use the first video, which is using the first pattern, you know the root note above it is always going to be the middle group of 3, 3, 3, and you can go from there. Does that make sense? That's all he's trying to say.
     
  5. Eddie 70

    Eddie 70 Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,188
    Likes Received:
    1,594
    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2013
    I have seen the first video before but it didn't really click with me. This time I understand what he is doing with it and can follow along. I like Steve Stine and liked his series on the minor pentatonics. I have seen this one before and just left it behind. I know the 5 patterns and Steve has good lessons on that.

    Thanks for getting me to re-watch and learn something neat.
     
    DW4LesPaul likes this.
  6. DW4LesPaul

    DW4LesPaul Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,154
    Likes Received:
    234
    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2014
    Here is part two of that series, which really slams the concept home.



    Of course, it's really cool once yo get it. All he is doing is showing us that every single pattern is really just the 1st pattern on different parts of the neck. if you start on the root note, you just play the 1st position.

    That's why these two videos go so well with each other.
     
    Eddie 70 likes this.
  7. bgunckel

    bgunckel Member

    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    43
    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2013
    Very cool... thanks!
     
  8. RockyMtnGuitars

    RockyMtnGuitars Senior Member

    Messages:
    103
    Likes Received:
    132
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Holy $h!t I think you just changed my world with that first video. I don't typically play lead, partly because I don't see how things fit together. Stitch just put it together in a way that makes sense to me.
     
    Eddie 70 likes this.
  9. OldBenKenobi

    OldBenKenobi Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,923
    Likes Received:
    7,643
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2010
    This has changed my world as well. I've struggled with the pentatonic scale for years, I've never been able to think outside of A Minor. In a few days since watching these videos the whole neck is opened up. I can't believe I never realized it before, it's so obvious in hindsight.
     

Share This Page