This is Sparta!

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by poro78, Mar 24, 2012.

  1. ROCK_GURU

    ROCK_GURU Senior Member

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    Nice looking case, perhaps something like this would have been ok :thumb:
    [​IMG]
     
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  2. BleedingGums

    BleedingGums Senior Member

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    When cutting foam, I have had some success using a soldering iron and bare, 12 GA copper wire. What I did was remove the solder gun tip and replace it with the copper wire. The wire was bent/formed in such a was as to give a wide cutting area, almost shaped like a U, but with the ends closer together so that they would fit in the solder gun terminals.

    On another note, I have been watching your thread since the begging and must say that it has been a pleasure to watch. The build looks great.
     
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  3. poro78

    poro78 Noble savage Premium Member

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    Perhaps. But good spray glues are hard to find here.
    I have one can, but that stuff is really lousy. :hmm:

    Well, I thought about something like that, but didn't have anything to suitable to apply to the tip.

    Spank you very much for watching! It's nice to hear that this hasn't been too painful to follow. :naughty:
     
  4. VictOr358

    VictOr358 Senior Member

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    I'm afraid, you're doing it a bit wrong.
    First of all, melting a Styrofoam with an iron is mighty hazardous, Formaldehyde fumes are being released. A knife or a hot Nickel-Chrome alloy wire (under DC current, I must check volts and ampers in a book) are common tools to cut the stuff.

    Second, if I understand it correctly, the case inner shape must be formed out of 3 pieces, a hood (flat), a shape and a bottom (also flat). Each piece is covered with fabric separately, then everything is assembled together.

    Also, you might add some minor layer of soft underlining, like synthepone or other cotton wool like material.
     
  5. poro78

    poro78 Noble savage Premium Member

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    Hmm... Thanks for the guidance, again. :thumb:
    I admit that I'm just going with flow and doing things without really knowing how to achieve what I'm looking for.

    Luckily I have plenty of material. :D
    Also I can quite easily cut that shape out of the sheet, so that might save this piece I'm working with now.

    And I was using mask and the balcony door was wide open as I used the soldering iron. Being paranoid is sometimes rather good.


    I also went to my friend's rehearsal "dungeon" yesterday and showed him the guitar.
    ...so my next project will be building something for him.
     
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  6. Jusamies

    Jusamies Senior Member

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    :lol:

    Nice work, man! :applause: I gotta see this should I ever bump into you somewhere!
     
  7. mills_kaviar

    mills_kaviar Member

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    Hi. Nice work.
    Where did you get the mahogany?
     
  8. poro78

    poro78 Noble savage Premium Member

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    Thanks!
    I bought the woods from Korpi Instruments, a luthier who's living in Kangasala (about 150-200km from here).
    But I think I'll check if I can get the next woods from DLH Finland.
    Ordering woods without seeing what you get isn't exactly the optimal situation. :hmm:

    As you live in Oslo, I'd check DLH Norge.
     
  9. mills_kaviar

    mills_kaviar Member

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    Tnx! Just what I have been looking for a couple of years:)
     
  10. poro78

    poro78 Noble savage Premium Member

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    Hmmm.. I changed the plan with the case and now I'm surrounded by styrofoam waste and strips of fabric. :rolleyes:
    Covering the odd shaped pieces with fabric is harder than it sounds...
    I'll take a little break of this project, regroup and surprise it with an attack from the flank. :naughty:

    That means I'm going to think this over and over before continuing, because soon I'll be having no more spare materials to waste if I continue this way. :D

    Of course I had to try to do something right today after screwing something up again.
    So...
    The operation tone pot.
    I found the pots from the Strato-clone corpse a while ago and now I just took one tone pot and cleaned it up leaving the cap on. (The volume and tone pots and wires were still connected as I had just taken them off as they were when I wrecked that guitar.)
    Then I just took the old pot out and put even older pot in.

    And it works! :thumb:
    It seems I had fried the pot when soldering it the first time.
     
  11. Bgetraer

    Bgetraer Senior Member

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    i was looking through my lee valley catalogue recently, and so when i read your last post i thought of this:

    Flocking Kit - Lee Valley Tools

    it allows you to put a thin but soft, felt like colored protective lining on odd (or regular) shaped things without dealing with tons of cloth and spray glue! i dont know if it is too hard for you to get this shipped to you, or expensive, but this might work!

    on the styrofoam you may have to put a filler, like a wipe on putty/spackle kind of thing, to get a flat smooth surface if you try this...

    :thumb:

    benjy getraer
     
  12. poro78

    poro78 Noble savage Premium Member

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    Sounds too easy. :D
     
  13. JonSG

    JonSG Senior Member

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    Once again you have found a way to fix everything! Your projects motivate me to "mess up" my own guitar. No need to worry all mistakes can be corrected. You should have a show on public TV called Poro's no fear guitar build - for everyone who enjoys doing it the hard way just 'cause you can:)
     
  14. poro78

    poro78 Noble savage Premium Member

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    Thanks, Jon.
    I think I'd be screwed if this was some kind of hi-gloss luxury build. :cool:
    But luckily I built a dirty and mean noise machine. :dude:
    All these little imperfections and damages are just bonuses for the image.

    Next projects might not be as forgiving, but we'll adjust to that situation, eh? :naughty:


    Quote for the day: He who avoids all mistakes is not doing anything at all.
     
  15. Couch-Commando

    Couch-Commando Junior Member

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    Hey, great build!

    I am currently living in a dorm style apartment with no tools watsoever. I left all of my guitar stuff at my parents house 2000 miles away, and have spent the time I would normally spend playing guitar reading about guitars instead. :laugh2:

    The Barnaby threads gave me the idea that perhaps I could spend my time, instead of reading about guitars, building a guitar. I've always wanted to build a les paul, but am not ambitious enough to try that as my first. I'm thinking an SG junior type build might be a good start. I've already been sourcing parts, woods, etc.

    I think the tools I would buy would be an electric drill with forstner bits for the pickup/neck cavity, a japanese saw, a coping saw, some chisels and rasps, and a whole lot of sand paper.

    I'm just curious how doable you think this would be. I have zero woodworking experience beyond reprofiling and refinishing an M1 Garand stock, but generally have a decent artistic touch. The lack of woodworking is what worries me. :shock:

    I am mainly looking for a a project for me to resort to when my head hurts too much from math and statistics, which is more constructive than surfing the internet or watching TV. :hmm:
     
  16. Jusamies

    Jusamies Senior Member

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    I am a ninth grader and the most advanced build I have done is a toy, where a dude comes down some kind of ladder. If you have ever carved a piece of wood in your life, you qualify to try guitar building. :) I at least think so. Of course, whatecer I do with my build, other people here do better, so for advice, go to them.
     
  17. Couch-Commando

    Couch-Commando Junior Member

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    I have unfortunately never carved a piece of wood, but I have studied the basic mechanics of the components of solid body guitars, how they function and operate, etc. I have been playing for about 10 years at this point.

    I figure there is only one way to learn how to make a guitar from scratch, and that's doing it.
     
  18. JonSG

    JonSG Senior Member

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    Couch-Commando - If you build because it feels good to do so then your mind is in the right place. Now just invest a bunch of money in hand tools and wood and start making some sawdust. You sound like a smart guy, half of the challenge of building a guitar is doing the research, the other half is sticking to it, the other half is skill. Oh and most importantly you need spot on math skills :)
     
  19. Couch-Commando

    Couch-Commando Junior Member

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    Well, I'm in a math based grad program so hopefully I have the math! Our "fall break" is just about over and I have searched all over the internet trying to find plans. I was able to find a plan for an SG standard, a body plan for an SG junior and various sources for woods and tools. My final goal is to get to build a les paul standard type guitar with p90's, but I think an SG junior would be a much simpler, cost effective guitar to start with. I love the sound of P90's and such a guitar would cover most of my bases. For the most part I usually play stratocasters and don't really care for the humbucker sound normally, but I love the sound of P90's.

    If anyone has any preferred online plans for SG style guitars, I'd love some recommendations!

    ETA: The other idea I've been entertaining is getting a broken guitar off of ebay (headstock repairs, stripped truss rods or terribly abused finishes) and fixing it. So far people have been bidding on broken headstock les paul studios up to almost the price most rational people would be willing to pay for one that has had a headstock repair... :/
     
  20. poro78

    poro78 Noble savage Premium Member

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    Well, I didn't have much experience with woodworking, but I managed to build a decent guitar (= best I've played, that's not much but still). ;)
    But you don't need much skill and experience if you replace them with a lot of patience and some careful thinking. :)

    So...when are you starting? :naughty:
     

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