Thinking of aging my R7

Discussion in 'The Custom Shop' started by Encrypted, Mar 6, 2016.

  1. Leebak

    Leebak Senior Member

    Messages:
    351
    Likes Received:
    171
    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2015

    very wise words!!!
     
  2. Leebak

    Leebak Senior Member

    Messages:
    351
    Likes Received:
    171
    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2015
    The other day a guy asked me how can I keep the guitar lacquer in so good condition since it shines like new but its very soft to the touch instead of beeing sticky.
    When I bought that guitar, the neck was so sticky that I almost sanded it.
    Then I discovered the ways to age the lacquer so it can be smooth but shiny. Taked me like 2 months.
    Now my guitar looks like I wanted and feels like I wanted so believe me or not, I play better with it cause in my mind im more confortable
    I like those kind of relics:
    the ones that form 1 meter the guitar looks like new but if you go close and inspect the details, its worn out :D
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. Robbks

    Robbks Senior Member

    Messages:
    534
    Likes Received:
    478
    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2012
    Store it in a bright sunny location, in the hall-way where you will kick it over all the time.
     
    2 people like this.
  4. deadlyweasel

    deadlyweasel Silver Supporter

    Messages:
    1,154
    Likes Received:
    708
    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2011
    My opinion is if you want to age your guitar you should. Do what will make you happy, and if aging it makes you excited to play and gets you to play it more do it! That being said, do it smart, do not rush it and try to be very thorough and mindful of what you are doing. Take things a step at a time and think about how you play it! Put your guitar on and see where your buckle is and have it aged there. Watch yourself play and see how your body interacts with your guitar and those are the places you want to age. Nothing looks more fake to me than a guitar with buckle rash no where near where the players buckle would be, or arm wear where their arm doesn't touch! These are things I believe are most important when aging a guitar. Make the guitar for the player not just where you think it should be from other guitars. And have fun with it!
     
    3 people like this.
  5. zwip778

    zwip778 Member

    Messages:
    66
    Likes Received:
    27
    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2010
    I respectfully disagree with the popular opinion of "just play it". I think a guitar well-aged guitar does give a certain mojo.

    In my financial situation, I would never relic a custom shop Gibson though because I'm afraid that I would lose too much money. You never know if one day you'll want to sell. Just recently I bought a custom shop Gibson for a decent price but then sold it because I'm falling in love with Teles more so I had to sell to finance that. So my advice is don't do it unless you're financially ok with potentially losing 30% of the used market value. You could even lose more than that depending on the job you do.

    Personally, I dig reliced guitars but would not buy one that was reliced by an individual. I would buy only if Gibson/Fender/Nash/etc had done it.

    Edit: adding @badly drawn les to the list of people that I would buy a relic from, just re-read his thread on his relic job, stunning results
     
    2 people like this.
  6. El Kabong

    El Kabong Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,766
    Likes Received:
    7,567
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2013
    Indeed... unless you turn out being some kind of aging prodigy, you will likely cut the value of the guitar in half (if not more). So you might want to keep that in mind while browsing the aging aisle at Walmart... :naughty:
     
  7. Axeman16

    Axeman16 V.I.P. Member

    Messages:
    2,672
    Likes Received:
    278
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2007
    a guitar only has mojo from being used and played.a new guitar with fake wear does not have mojo. you know why those guys who played les pauls back in the day had mojo guitars? because they found a guitar they liked and played the sheit out of it until it was a part of them and could not be replaced.

    also all should know in the era of les paul rock the 70's those aged lesters you all so desperately pine over were not aged . the guitars of that era were no more or less than 12-22 years old. in any of their primes those lesters did not look like anything 'aged' by todays standards. im talking page gibbons etc.

    be realistic people. if you have a guitar youve played for 20-30 years it should look it. having a new guitar that looks like its 20-30 years old just makes you a poser.

    its like saying hey boys i got this black eye in a bar fight, i whooped 5 guys asses when in reality you just hit yourself in the face.
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. zwip778

    zwip778 Member

    Messages:
    66
    Likes Received:
    27
    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2010
    First off, if you buy an aged guitar and lead people to think you've earned it the old school way then you're a fool.

    I think though that the difference of opinion comes from a different way of looking at the relationship between the player and his/her instrument.

    You see a guitar partly as a reflection of someone's life experiences, thus your analogy with a black eye. I could also cite permanent injuries, prison tattoos in that list. There is nothing wrong with looking at a guitar that way so I respect your opinion 100%. Clearly people who've been on tours have those kind of experiences and that's great.

    I look at a guitar as obviously an instrument just like you but also just as a cool object, like a turntable for example. I don't assume that someone who has an old looking instrument has had any more world tours than I have (zero in my case). I see the guitar independently of the person playing it, which leads me to the reason why I wouldn't mind buying a reliced guitar: because it looks cooler. The plastic look of the new instruments don't capture the atmosphere I like in general in my life. I listen to music from the 60's, hate modern music, like old movies etc.


    Also, it could be an age thing as few people would expect me to have aged the old school way a guitar but maybe if I was older it would be more realistic and then I could see your point more. But if I see a twenty something with a guitar full of mojo, I expect it to be reliced or just bought as a vintage guitar so I would not give him the credit for road-worning it.
     
  9. ajory72

    ajory72 Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,118
    Likes Received:
    440
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2010
    TheX shows his 58 which looks well cared for but no doubt has plenty of natural aging up close etc. all my builds have very thin nitro with no plastisizers so that they will age gracefully, ones in the case for my daughter so looks brand new. The other I've played daily for 3 years, it starting to lose little strips of nitro from the back of the neck and a little arm wear. But that's it, and it more natural looking. I do admit to buyin aged speed knobs though as the new ones looked too new .

    I say refinish it and let the years age it gracefully, or get Kym to do a heavy relic on. It:)

    Good luck either way
     
  10. badly drawn les

    badly drawn les Senior Member

    Messages:
    701
    Likes Received:
    1,051
    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2010
    A few points;
    I gigged my 2002 Std hard for 10 years & it still looked new.
    The thought of having the same guitar for 20/30 years is alien to me. I always want one better.
    The first time I saw a beat up old guitar & thought it looked cool was Roy Buchanan in the early 70s.
     
    1 person likes this.
  11. Axeman16

    Axeman16 V.I.P. Member

    Messages:
    2,672
    Likes Received:
    278
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2007
    well im in my mid 20s and when i got my les it looked new and playing it for 10+ years it has worn and grown just like i have. so do i not get credit?
     
  12. zwip778

    zwip778 Member

    Messages:
    66
    Likes Received:
    27
    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2010
    When talking about relicing a guitar, it's to get the vintage look, not a 10 year old guitar look or even 20 so your situation is very different. Typically vintage stops at the end of the 60's.

    I never said you or anyone else does not get the credit.

    I'm just saying I'm not making assumptions about people and their relationship with their objects. If I see a Porsche driver, I wouldn't assume they are good driver but if someone tells me they are, I'm cool with it.

    In your case, if you played with a guitar that looks like a well-played 59 LP, yes I would assume it's not you who did 99 % of the road worning because you'd need to be born before the 90's to have aged that guitar... I'd think you make more money than me and bought a real vintage lp or bought a custom shop one.
     
  13. Axeman16

    Axeman16 V.I.P. Member

    Messages:
    2,672
    Likes Received:
    278
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2007
    no kidding look at the general driving skill of mercedes drivers or rather lack there of.
     
  14. Axeman16

    Axeman16 V.I.P. Member

    Messages:
    2,672
    Likes Received:
    278
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2007
  15. jstarr823

    jstarr823 Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,187
    Likes Received:
    4,182
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2011
    If there's one thing that I have learned about ageing, it's best to do it behind closed doors. Don't even let your wife know you're doing. There's a correlation here...
     
    2 people like this.
  16. nicolasrivera

    nicolasrivera Senior Member

    Messages:
    19,564
    Likes Received:
    10,594
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2008
    Do it, its the best thing on a goldtop, i did it to mine and every day is like first night hooneymoon!:naughty:
     
  17. jamman

    jamman Premium Member

    Messages:
    8,978
    Likes Received:
    7,215
    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2010
    Never polish it ,,In a year it will llook like crap ,,, Wear a belt with a Huge Buckle , 3 months and you won't see the difference between that and "Aging it " Stand up and play" for 30 minutes a day should do it ,using a "Cowboy" type buckle .:shock:

    Bang the headstock into your guitar stand until you chip it .It's easy ...:lol:

    The arm wear might be the most difficult to get quickly .... Not polishing it ,,and playing it every day , you should start seeing it haze over , quickly ..... couple of months

    All will be Natural wear and you can say with a grin, you did it all yourself .
    Real Mojo ???? whatever that is ...IMO beats having someone you pay, do the exact same thing for you ....
     
    1 person likes this.
  18. moreles

    moreles Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,275
    Likes Received:
    861
    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2011
    Unless you really know what you're doing, it's not wise to risk an excellent and pricey guitar. Crappy, fake relic-ing is not hard; convincing work take practice. If you want something that looks like a beater, buy a beater, or risk a less-expensive model. Many of us love the feel of a worn guitar; I find the overdone shine of new production to be a bit off-putting and far less inviting to touch and play. But I would not truly relic any guitar myself, and certainly wouldn't give it a shot for the first time on a valuable instrument. No one else is going to value your personal relic job.
     
  19. johnny7322

    johnny7322 Senior Member

    Messages:
    176
    Likes Received:
    161
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2013
    Do it. Its YOUR guitar.
     
  20. oldflame

    oldflame Senior Member

    Messages:
    124
    Likes Received:
    39
    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2008
    As a matter of interest, I've had a good few historics and only one of them checked on its own. It was a 2001 R9. Why did I sell that?! Maybe the paint shop got the mix wrong that day......

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.

Share This Page