The MLP Classical Guitar Thread - Covering all finger style from 1500 - to now!

Discussion in 'Guitar Lessons' started by Cpt Matt Sparrow, Jan 20, 2014.

  1. djjagdish

    djjagdish Senior Member

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    Just found this thread - great resource! Allow me to post 2 of my favorite classical guitar pieces:

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HM_a3XRQd7k]Fernando Sor - Study in B minor, Op.35, No.22 - YouTube[/ame]

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXLbQPwUl3Y]Leo Brouwer Etude 6 - YouTube[/ame]
     
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  2. Cpt Matt Sparrow

    Cpt Matt Sparrow Senior Member

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    Hi Guys!

    I love hearing/seeing other players - thank you for sharing. But I hope you will also eventually share things you are working on too!!

    We all know each other here at MLP, in an online way - so we already know we are a welcoming bunch :)

    Even a camera phone ten second clip is great. If someone is reading this and is completely fresh, please fire away your questions!

    Matt
     
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  3. Brian I

    Brian I Senior Member

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    Great thread, Matt, but I noticed some information in your first post that doesn't seem quite right. The lute and guitar share a common ancestor, the oud, but coexisted for a very long time. In the 15th century, the lute had become very popular in europe, but the vihuela (a guitar shaped instrument played and tuned like a lute) evolved presumably due to a dislike of muslims in Spain during that time. In the 16th century, the 4 course (8/7 strings) renaissance guitar had come to be and was exceptionally popular. It was used mostly for strumming to accompany singers and was considered to be of a lower class than the vihuela (vihuelas and lutes were plucked, not strummed).

    The 5 course (9/10 strings) baroque guitar came later in the 17th century with makers like Sellas, Stradivari, and Voboam creating some of the highest quality instruments at the time. By the late 18th and early 19th century, the guitar lost it's courses, gained a string and entered into the romantic period. Makers like Lacote, CF Martin, Stauffer, and Fabricatore were among the most skilled of the romantic builders and built instruments for people like Sor and Giuliani. The modern guitar then came to be in the mid 19th century starting with makers like Panormo and then perfected by Torres.

    Anyway, here's a video of one of my favorite classical guitarists, Marc Teicholz playing an all original 1867 Torres.

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWaCrFo61hM]Assad 'Seis Brevidadas' and 'Valseana' played by Marc Teicholz - YouTube[/ame]

    Just some background on the guitars maker, Torres is essentially the father of the modern classical guitar. He combined things like a larger plantilla and fan bracing, as well as contributed a unique Spanish aesthetic that is still central to the classical guitar. On average, little has changed since Torres in regards to the structural design of classical guitars (save for most modern guitars having larger plantillas) and his instruments are the classical guitar equivalent to the instruments of Antonio Stradivari.

    Of the 300 or so instruments Torres is believed to have built, an estimated 90 are thought to still be in existence in some form or another.
     
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  4. Brian I

    Brian I Senior Member

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    BTW, very impressive playing in your demos; your version of Asturias is very enjoyable to listen to and the range of colors you were able to get from your guitars was very nice.
     
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  5. Cpt Matt Sparrow

    Cpt Matt Sparrow Senior Member

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    Thanks Brian, welcome to the thread too!

    You are quite right! :slash:

    I am concentrating on the lute's evolution to the classical guitar, from a repertoire point of view, in that the music has transferred from one instrument (the lute) to the other (the modern day classical guitar) and shares the umbrella term 'classical' these days (Dowland, Byrd being played by a lot of classical guitarists as well as Lute players in recital rooms). But thanks for the info, the Muslim theory is a sad one and with today's division, forgive the pun, but strikes a chord even more!

    Edit - I will pm you, but with your permission, perhaps we could expand the original post by adding this aspect to it? Cheers Matt

    I have played a played a bloody 1959 Les Paul but not a Torres! I need to get my priorities straight :laugh2:
     
  6. Stinky Kitty

    Stinky Kitty Senior Member

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    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L3FlG2uJgY8"]La Malaguena - YouTube[/ame]

    This passion makes my soul boil.
    The compelling seduction, finesse, fire, stirring...
    breathe

    Words fail, her treasure a gift. She is Grace.
     
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  7. Stinky Kitty

    Stinky Kitty Senior Member

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    Sublime

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bCxvkYgrFFg]Irene Gomez plays Granada by Isaac Albeniz - YouTube[/ame]
     
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  8. Stinky Kitty

    Stinky Kitty Senior Member

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  9. Stinky Kitty

    Stinky Kitty Senior Member

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    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Qw7jP7Fyyg]Prelude No 1 by Heitor Villa-Lobos - Music Only - Irene Gomez | Strings By Mail Sponsored Artist - YouTube[/ame]
     
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  10. Cpt Matt Sparrow

    Cpt Matt Sparrow Senior Member

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    ^ I have never heard such a laid back version as Irene Gomez' version of Villa Lobos' Prelude number one -

    This is one of the many things I love about classical guitar; 'interpretation'. The pieces have so much to them, both in their construction and also depth of feeling, that there are limitless ways to perform the same piece.

    I don't like Irene Gomez' playing in this - and would play it completely differently, but that in itself is the wonder of classical performance! You hear things and think "I would go faster there, slower there - that bit needs more colour etc" and that is why they are them and you are you. I suppose which is why the same recordings of pieces, will always be made, again and again through time, but with the latest artist's fingerprint on it.

    So a real case of viva la difference - and also it makes me think of the amazing pianist Glen Gould; he said if you are going to record/perform something, that has already been done, then make sure it is different to all others that already exist, or there is no point in performing. Obviously that excludes people playing solely for pleasure, but I pretty much agree with Mr G!

    Great stuff Kitty!!
     
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  11. Stinky Kitty

    Stinky Kitty Senior Member

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    Thank you Cpt for starting this thread. I vote for a sub forum dedicated to classical.

    I agree that the breadth of expression is amazing with such an instrument as responsive to approach.

    And worship the intensity with which this instrument, the mini symphony grants individuality.

    Listening renders me inarticulate.
     
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  12. Cpt Matt Sparrow

    Cpt Matt Sparrow Senior Member

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    This fella is still quite controversial, thirty years after his death!!!

    My wife's old piano tutor, while admiring his technique and putting his own stamp on Bach, hated how outlandish his approach was.

    His softs being VERY soft, louds VERY loud, the use of staccato on both hands and also the tempo choices being just as extreme. Personally I love him - I think he brings Bach alive and I can't listen to a lot of the many similar (which to me) are middle of the road safe versions.

    As a classical guitarist, him and Julian Bream are two guys that have really left a mark on my classical playing. Just like Randy Rhoads has on my rock guitar playing and Jimmy Rosenberg and Django have on my gypsy jazz playing!

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=89W_cLYQ2gM]Glenn Gould 4/4 Goldberg Variations (HQ audio - 1981) - YouTube[/ame]
     
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  13. Stinky Kitty

    Stinky Kitty Senior Member

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    Just like creator gods, the masters breathe the image of themselves into the fabric of the timeworn elements. Each a different incarnation carrying the dynamic flavors of the moments in which their creators felt compelled to translate from their hearts.
     
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  14. Cpt Matt Sparrow

    Cpt Matt Sparrow Senior Member

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    Kitty

    After an evening of live music and considerable boozing - I popped a 15 mg codeine thirty minutes ago to cure my groggyness...so I am semi stoned and COMPLETELY got that!

    The Mattster
     
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  15. Cpt Matt Sparrow

    Cpt Matt Sparrow Senior Member

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    Lets maybe pm LedZep later. I completely agree!

    Maybe keep this one for more nuts and bolts stuff, technique, exercises, sharing tabs, clips of each other's playing etc - and another one devoted to classical music appreciation :cool::thumb:

    Matt
     
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  16. Stinky Kitty

    Stinky Kitty Senior Member

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    Mother Poppy is a startling Mistress!
     
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  17. paradice

    paradice Senior Member

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    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jh4FJ-DXiOA"]Scott Tennant - The Frog Galliard - YouTube[/ame]

    had this guys 'pumping nylon' ! book sitting in my cupboard for ages, gonna start working through it, not sure why I never started when i got it....

    is there any difference between a spanish guitar and a classical guitar
    was buying strings yesterday and saw one exactly like mine, the guy at the shop said it was a spanish guitar, not a calssical guitar
    is that right ?

    also - what's the name of the little white (plastic?) bit that sits in the slot of the bridge ?
     
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  18. Stinky Kitty

    Stinky Kitty Senior Member

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    The Saddle.

    The classical guitar as we have inherited it is referred to as the Spanish Guitar, for many reasons ranging from construction methods, to Master Segovia's efforts. And this too.

    It's wonderful to hear you are inspired to start!
     
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  19. Cpt Matt Sparrow

    Cpt Matt Sparrow Senior Member

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    It is interesting you say this because I introduce it to pupils as a Spanish guitar and not a classical guitar, because a lot of youngsters I have found have an already preconceived idea of 'classical' as something that is very hard, possibly boring and something they think they will not like.

    I say 'Spanish' guitar and start showing them all the different tones and talking of the exciting and exotic composers' names, it seems to capture their imagination!

    Matt
     
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  20. Cpt Matt Sparrow

    Cpt Matt Sparrow Senior Member

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    re tab and notation

    With all pupils, even rock guitar ones, if they are complete beginners, I don't even tell the tab exists until about 8 or 9 months into lessons. That way, the hardest thing has been done (to learn how to music read) and then I introduce tab as a way to scribble ideas in a short hand...

    In the late 90's when I started teaching properly, I noticed that tab and then music, would cause reluctance as music seemed so hard compared to how easy tab was!

    Matt
     
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