The MLP Blues Guitar Course

Discussion in 'Guitar Lessons' started by sliding tom, Feb 16, 2009.

  1. DW4LesPaul

    DW4LesPaul Senior Member

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    OK makes a lot more sense, but glad we had a E5 discussion. I was playing with it yesterday, and simply barred off the lower 4 strings, and then use my index finger to hit the 5th string and mute the low E. That way I have more to play with. It seems to work well, and I can slide it too.

    Some transient in the park yesterday asked if he could show me a trick. SO I said, sure. So he "drop D'ed the fat E and played me some really good blues. I let him hear a few songs I like on my cellphone,and he picked those up and played them back after only about 3 listens to the song. Pretty cool! The guy was really talented, but admitted he has no idea what the chord names are he hits, as he "just plays by ear and feeling." Impressive. (Poor guy said his guitar was stolen.)

    I let him listen to Jimmy Hedrix's Jelly 292 and Bloomfield's STOP, which he had never heard, and after several tries he said he was confused by what they were doing and it would take a lot more time for him to figure it out. He said those two songs were pretty complex, more so than the usual stuff, as they were mixing chords and scales and keys.

     
  2. DW4LesPaul

    DW4LesPaul Senior Member

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    Got some large hands there do ya Hedrix? "low E string played with the thimb," indeed. Oh some day maybe, just maybe.

    OK so open C minor chord. How worried should I be that I about put my hand in a cast trying to hit that chord at the open position? And I don't even like the way it sounds open.

     
  3. huw

    huw V.I.P. Member

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    :laugh2:

    Don't worry at all - I don't think anyone can play that one as an open position chord, certainly not all six strings. But there are at least a couple of very useful moveable shapes using just a few strings that you can get out of it, by taking smaller parts out of the larger whole, like this one:

    e x
    B 1
    G 0
    D 1
    A x
    E x

    That little nugget is one I use a lot. The root note is on the B string, so for example it becomes an E minor if you play it here:

    e x
    B 5
    G 4
    D 5
    A x
    E x

    :)
     
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  4. DW4LesPaul

    DW4LesPaul Senior Member

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    I'm so glad you said that. I was expecting something like: "Oh it's really one of the easier chords to play. Just practice!"

     
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  5. DW4LesPaul

    DW4LesPaul Senior Member

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    What about the G7 form up and down the neck? I can hit it in the middle of the fretboard fairly well, but upper and lower get really hard and contorted. Would it be better to use an easier form for the same chord instead of the G7 open form when a 7 is needed?
     
  6. DW4LesPaul

    DW4LesPaul Senior Member

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    OK I went back and read your comment again and I think you were talking about the A13. Exactly how to you play it? And what position are you talking about?

     
  7. sliding tom

    sliding tom Senior Member

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    Yes.

    A 13 chord will mostly be fingered using the E and C shapes. A is also easy to finger.

    A 13, E shape

    e - 5
    b - 7
    g - 6
    d - 5
    a - 7
    e - 5

    D 13, C shape:

    e - 7
    b - 5
    g - 5
    d - 4
    a - 5
    e - x

    D13, A shape:

    e - 7
    b - 7
    g - 5
    d - 7
    a - 5
    e - x
     
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  8. DW4LesPaul

    DW4LesPaul Senior Member

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    Thanks Tom.

     
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  9. Tazz3

    Tazz3 Senior Member

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    i dont wanna sound to much like a newbie. instead of counting 1 2 3 4 just count 123??
     
  10. sliding tom

    sliding tom Senior Member

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    Not sure what you are talking about here - triplets? :hmm:
     
  11. Tazz3

    Tazz3 Senior Member

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    what i ment is should i count to 3 or 4 before switching chords?? sorry tom
     
  12. sliding tom

    sliding tom Senior Member

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    No need to be sorry, tazz...

    ...still not sure what you are referring to. Could you probabyl refer to a specific post? :hmm:
     
  13. straightblues

    straightblues Senior Member

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    This is some great stuff. I have been a member of this forum for a long time. I can't believe I haven't seen it before. Man have I been missing out.
     
  14. sliding tom

    sliding tom Senior Member

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    Thanks!:)
     
  15. InkedLester

    InkedLester Drippin with Blues Blood

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    Yep, and I've burned through a few teachers. I always start with "I'm one of those guys that wants to know why I'm doing what I'm doing" and most of my teachers have said I tend to overcomplicate things and I just need to learn to play songs. Go figure. :wow:
     
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  16. sliding tom

    sliding tom Senior Member

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    I actually like students who want to know what they're doing and why....:thumb:
     
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  17. Thunderheart

    Thunderheart Member

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    I'm new here and very glad I found this.....what a resource!
     
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  18. LiveSimply

    LiveSimply Senior Member

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    Tom, as you know, I'm in the midst of my "Clapton" phase, for better or for worse, and one of the tunes I'm currently working through is his cover of Robert Johnson's Cross Road Blues (Crossroads).

    I'm working off of Clapton's original recorded version he did while with Cream, and I'm noticing that during the verses the guitar appears to have a simple eighth rhythm, and I also hear it as all down strokes.

    So, for example during the D (IV) chord in the verses, I hear the following in eighths:

    -------------------------
    -------------------------
    --2 2 4 2 2 2 4 2
    --0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
    ------------------------
    ------------------------

    Very early in your course (page 1) you mentioned that a straight eight feel for blues is not very common and that playing straight fouths or eights (as opposed to a triplet feel or a shuffle feel), would make a song feel a bit "corny".

    My questions is: Given that Clapton seems to be playing straight eighths during the rhythm of the verses, is there something about the bass rhythm or the drums that lends itself to that sort of simpler feel? Or is it that the "cornyness" factor :laugh2: is offset by that classic riff he interjects during most of the I chords?

    Not being in a band, its hard for me to know how specific drum rhythms vary and I'm assuming that it's the drums that are pushing him to that straight eight rhythm, but I wanted to get your take. A more likely possibility is that I'm just hearing it wrong :laugh2:, but I just hear eighths there.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PE9HvSdcaL4

    Thanks, as always.

    LS
     
  19. sliding tom

    sliding tom Senior Member

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    Hi LS.

    Yes - that's a straight eighths rhythm - no triplet feeling, no shuffle. More typical of rock /bluesrock. To me that's possibly the reason why the guitar solo doesn't swing and is quite angular in the phrasing. I know that this version is being adored by a lot of fans and players but it's not Clapton at his best in my book....:naughty:
     
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  20. LiveSimply

    LiveSimply Senior Member

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    I too am guilty of really liking this solo. It is teaching me a lot about mixing major and minor (the first solo is, at least). Tom, I assume that if there is a shuffle or triplet feel to a song, ALL of the rhythm section follows the same shuffle groove, or is that not correct? Can you have the bass and guitar shuffling off of a straight drum groove.... or the bass straight and the drums and guitar shuffling? I assume that would sound off?

    So in this case for example, could Clapton have shuffled or is he just driving off of what the bass and drums are giving him?

    Thx
     

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