Tech Stuff , massive LP setup ( pic heavy)

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Roman, May 4, 2010.

  1. Cloverdale Road

    Cloverdale Road Banned

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    Hi Roman, I noticed that your location is listed as Shasta Lake. Are you still at this location or have you moved shop? I'm asking because I live very close to Shasta Lake and would love for you to spruce up my Les Paul.
     
  2. Lefty Adams

    Lefty Adams Senior Member

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    Hey roman, I've just found this thread and I gotta say, wow! it's good to see when someone knows what they're doing. Shame you're so far away, I would visit you in a heartbeat if you were in the uk.

    I am sure all your customers know what great service they receive from you! Great stuff!
     
  3. gibsonguy88mc

    gibsonguy88mc Junior Member

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    Hi all, Im brand new here so Please excuse me if im posting in the wrong area. Ok here is my issue...after my build was completed everything was great except one problem. When I was doing the final setup I discovered that I mounted my bridge a fraction to far back. after adjusting all bridge saddles as far as they could go (forward) No adjustment left, a couple of my strings were still flat. I did reverse saddles in an effort to gain, however, it still wasn't quite enough. So my question is, if anyone might have ANY other possible options that I could try ( apart from re drilling and moving the posts and bridge ahead ). I only need to gain approx. 2mm.
    Any help would greatly be appreciated guys.

    Thanks in advance for any possible suggestions.


    Gibsonguy88mc
     
  4. D. Spree

    D. Spree Member

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    Roman, thanks for the thread - and for the late nights typing and uploading images. I do have a question on the nut slots. On my Les Paul build that I am currently doing I did the slots parallel as you did, but was told by a trusted luthier friend that the lots on the Gibson (unlike on the Fender models which I have previously been building) don't run parallel but fan out from the front of the nut toward the tuner posts. Was told this reduces string binding. Before I remove and redo the nut I made do you have any thoughts?
     
  5. truckermde

    truckermde Senior Member

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    :io:you're kidding, right!?!?
     
  6. clmazza

    clmazza Senior Member

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    Awesome thread, Roman!
     
  7. Bill Hicklin

    Bill Hicklin Senior Member

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    Abalone: leave it slightly proud and sand flush. Yes, it scratches, but polishes up with successively finer grits. Glue films scratch and generally do not polish out.
     
  8. Bill Hicklin

    Bill Hicklin Senior Member

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    If I could toss in a tip, FWIW

    Finding the nut-slot depth by fretting and measuring works great, but an alternative (which avoids messing with calipers/feeler gauges) is to use a half-pencil: grind a pencil half-flat on the belt sander, sharpen it and lay it over the upper frets, then draw a line across the nut face. Fret height transferred directly, and there's your depth line.

    Trick h/t to Bill Cumpiano
     
  9. Tazz3

    Tazz3 Senior Member

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    Nice work I wish I could do this this stuff
     
  10. Pappy58

    Pappy58 Senior Member

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    Greetings, I just joined the forum recently and have been doing minor repairs, parts swap builds and custom wiring for years. I also have been resurrecting vintage amps for many years. Never got into the wood work much but have a mentor who is bringing me along. I have searched through a few of your posts and threads and found them to be very detailed. Your job on the neck break here is outstanding.

    I have a 86 Lester Studio (This is the 80's model with binding and PAF's, but dot inlays and silk screened logo. It has many lady bug chips on the back of the neck, and a poor job on key replacement and overall has been abused. This is going to be my winter project and I am jazzed I have found your info on the forum to add to the knowledge base. :cheers:

    ps; DeoxIT is the juice! I buy it by the six pack and use it often for anything with oxidized contacts. Compressed air style contact cleaners also stocked on my bench.
     
  11. Thunderheart

    Thunderheart Member

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    Roman......I am in awe. Changing strings for me is an exercise. :)
     
  12. Roman

    Roman Master Luthier V.I.P. V.I.P. Member

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    Good tip. especially since it provides a gauge for folks that don't do this stuff all the time. When you've done it a thousand times it's easier to wing it.

    :)

    To all others that have commented, thanks! Much apreciated.
     
  13. Roman

    Roman Master Luthier V.I.P. V.I.P. Member

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    On abalone or pearl, I usually leave the inlay sit slightly proud of the F/B and file off the top. Sure, it scratches the hell out of it at first but you can sand all that out, and eventually get a nice polish back onto the inlay.

    Never recess and fill with CA. It will look like crap and CA does over time sink and you'll have a crappy looking sunken inlay.

    Hope that helps, sorry I just now saw your question.

    :D
     
  14. moreles

    moreles Senior Member

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    Very generous of you to provide all the pics and explanations. It is really inspiring to see how you work by hand, and to see the tools you use. Though I have not come close to your production, I, too, began building and repairing when the only book out there was Irving Sloane's, StewMac was mostly for banjo parts, and places like Vitali Imports and H. Wild were suppliers! I used to get wood directly from Michael Gurian who on one occasion was nice enough to let me pick through his stash for my own sets. And -- to the point -- we all did most our building with regular hand tools. Heck -- the only power tool I had was a Dremel. My skills are not like yours, but I admire very much your reliance on your own hands and basic tools.
     
  15. BrianB

    BrianB Senior Member

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    The things this world has lost due to PB's greed.... :(
     
    lakeburst likes this.

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