Tech Stuff , massive LP setup ( pic heavy)

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Roman, May 4, 2010.

  1. lunchbox

    lunchbox Senior Member

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    Wow, I am an idoit. This picture just made me realize that I've been stringing my guitar incorrectly for years. I always put my strings straight through the tailpiece. I've never wrapped them around it like this. :facepalm:
    But I've never had a problem with intonation or staying in tune.
     
  2. Escher

    Escher Senior Member

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    You werent doing it wrong, its just a different way...

    This is called Top Wrapping, and some folks think it yields a "slinkier" feel because of the angle change relative to the bridge..
     
  3. gtr-tek

    gtr-tek Fumble Fingers

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    My impression of top wrapping is that the tailpiece can be screwed down tight to the body, making for better coupling and sustain. The "feel" part is a benefit as well. I prefer to use TonePros studs to lock things down even more for greater sustain and restringing is easier as the TP won't fall off. :cool:

    Don't feel like an idiot Lunchbox... :cool:
     
  4. Udonitron

    Udonitron Psychedelic Stoner Rock Premium Member

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    Shit...Roman, I love you man :D


    That is just personal preference really.
    I find tail wrapping sets the string angle closer the the angle at the nut and with the tail piece screwed down it sounds a little better.
    Not only that I break less strings and I can go up one gauge size since the tail wrapping gives a little more slink to the string gauge.
     
  5. Will55555

    Will55555 Member

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    Great Thread! Cheers Roman. It's always good to see how things are done by a pro. Threads like this are exactly the reason why I joined this forum. Keep up the good work & thanks for sharing.
     
  6. gspyda

    gspyda Senior Member

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    first time reading through this so forgive me, but is it safe to say a lot of people were "fretting" over this? bwahaha.....please done hate me! :fingersx:
     
  7. Lowdown

    Lowdown Senior Member

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    It would be great to see Roman back with some more inside info.
    It's always a treat to see and hear just how the Pro's really do it and everything learned is invaluable,especially to us who don't have direct access to professionals such as Roman and Greg.

    Where are you Roman? You're needed...
     
  8. Escher

    Escher Senior Member

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    Just wanted to chime in once again with a big thanks to Roman!

    I just finished a fretboard refinish the other day, using his scraping technique and salvaged what I thought were terrible inlays (all way too high for the fretboard)... after a good and thorough scraping, they are one with the ebony - can't even feel a seam.. amazing.

    No to mention its the best fret level job I've ever done... I'll be posting a thread about it soon - couldn't have done it without this thread!
     
  9. kcassady

    kcassady Senior Member

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    Holy crap AWESOME thread!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:slash:
     
  10. Roman

    Roman Master Luthier V.I.P. V.I.P. Member

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    Glad to help.:thumb:
     
  11. Freddy G

    Freddy G V.I.P. Member

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    I finally read this thread after looking at the sticky title forever. Here's where my eyes popped out! :wow:
    [​IMG]

    Oiling the nut. Freakin' brilliant! It's so simple...I had a "why didn't I think of that" kinda moment.
    Thanks Roman!
     
  12. Roman

    Roman Master Luthier V.I.P. V.I.P. Member

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    I thought your eyes popped out when you saw how old that can was.:laugh2:


    I have been oiling bone nuts forever.

    Even though bone is hard and dense, it is still porous. The oil soaks in and in essence gives you a permanently lubricated nut with the added benefit of giving the oil a nice aged color.:thumb:

    Tip: Oil it twice. Once after you cut the starting notches, and once after you are done. The slot cutting goes so much easier.



    PS. I had a similar moment when I saw you vise trick. But that IS the beauty of this place. We all learn from each other.:thumb:
     
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  13. bhmcintosh

    bhmcintosh Les Pauls, Telcasters, and 12strings Premium Member

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    Oiling the nut. Wait, what? Yeah, ok, that is one of those "Wow I coulda had a V8" moments, isn't it? I scribble some pencil lead into the nut slots every time I change strings; couple drops of oil absorbed by the nut material would do the job just dandy.
     
  14. itchybro

    itchybro Senior Member

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    How about "Tri-flo" graphite stuff. It's "liquid-y". Reckon that would soak in too?
     
  15. twinrider1

    twinrider1 Senior Member

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    How come you guys charge so much?




    :)
    Thanks for a great thread. Seriously, if I ever win the lottery, I'm going to travel around to all the great luthiers and sweep their shops for them. I'm sure I'll learn a lot.
     
  16. Roman

    Roman Master Luthier V.I.P. V.I.P. Member

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    The oil is a temporary fix for a non porous nut such as plastic, corian. It works best on bone


    Don't like it, the three in one oil or what they call sewing machine oil works the best. Trust me, in 30 some years I've tried it all.

    Cause we are worth it.:D Seriously most repair guys charge in the same range as the average auto mechanic. And judging by the cars I have seen most working musicians drive, guitar work is much more important to them.
    :laugh2:

    Your are welcome, and I have a LOT of sawdust to sweep.
     
  17. MRJ5

    MRJ5 Premium Member

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    Sorry to go off topic but it reminds me of a joke that actually is on topic.

    A giant ship engine failed. The ship’s owners tried one expert after another, but none of them could figure but how to fix the engine.

    Then they brought in an old man who had been fixing ships since he was a young. He carried a large bag of tools with him, and when he arrived, he immediately went to work. He inspected the engine very carefully, top to bottom.

    Two of the ship’s owners were there, watching this man, hoping he would know what to do. After looking things over, the old man reached into his bag and pulled out a small hammer. He gently tapped something. Instantly, the engine lurched into life. He carefully put his hammer away. The engine was fixed!

    A week later, the owners received a bill from the old man for ten thousand dollars.

    "What?!" the owners exclaimed. "He hardly did anything!"

    So they wrote the old man a note saying, "Please send us an itemized bill."

    The man sent a bill that read:

    Tapping with a hammer………………….. $ 2.00
    Knowing where to tap…………………….. $ 9,998.00

    These luthiers like Roman just know where to tap when the rest of us are standing around scratching our heads. :naughty:
     
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  18. Ole'Lefty

    Ole'Lefty Premium Member

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    That tale is usually told of Thomas Edison. When I actively practiced law, I would have discussions with clients about them paying me to know "what not to do." It is difficult to show that on an hourly bill. Generally it has to be reflected in a flat fee or a higher charge per hour. The rules of Criminal Procedure offer many motions that can be filed; however, depending on the prosecutor, filing every one that is available will guarantee angry and stubborn treatment of the client. It is the difference between your client feeling the "nudge" of the law versus a head-targeted tackle (to use a popular topic metaphor/simile--{which, is open to debate}
     
  19. Riku

    Riku Senior Member

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    Hey Roman, long time viewer, first time builder. Your restoration is gorgeous, but what oil did you use on the fretboard? It looks fantastic! I should want to get me some :D
     
  20. 2themax

    2themax Senior Member

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    Roman,

    Great detailed info, as always. :applause:

    I've got an abalone inlay question - I'm getting ready to do my first dot job on a maple neck and not sure about sanding the actual dot. Do you glue it in and sand it flush afterward or rout deep enough so there is a slight film of glue over the top?

    I don't know if abalone can be scratched or not. :hmm: I saw in your other "EPI set up" thread about cleaning up the FB with the razor blade. The dot You tube I saw showed using a fair amount of CAC glue and letting the dot settle into it (actually covering it). Is there a chance you could cover that, or the way you would recommend?

    Thanks for all the details...


    [​IMG]

    Instead of The nasty Green glue, I have mixed up a batch of 2 part epoxy mixed with rosewood dust.

    When ever I sand a fingerboard, I always save the dust. It is beautiful fine dust with a million and one uses.


    I now have the new inlays glued in. With a blade I scrape the inlays flush to the rosewood.

    [​IMG]


    We are coming along.

    After sanding the inlays and board smooth, I hit the board with a coat of oil.

    [​IMG]
     

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