Sound Interface for Computer recommendations?

Discussion in 'Recording Studio' started by gravmy0, Feb 21, 2009.

  1. gravmy0

    gravmy0 Senior Member

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    I'm interested in learning how to record some of the music I play on to a PC. What type of gear would i need to get to achieve such a goal.

    I would like to be able to plug my electric guitars either directly into an interface; or guitar -> amp -> interface.

    I would probably also need a input jack for a mic for recording my acoustic guitar.

    would anyone be able to recommend a good beginner interface that could achieve the requirements I listed?

    And what type of mic should I be looking into for acoustic mic'ing?

    Sorry a bit of a noob at this stuff.
    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. mrpesca

    mrpesca Senior Member

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    Try products from M-Audio. Lot's of stuff for plugging into your computer.
     
  3. Cantu

    Cantu V.I.P. Member

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    M-Audio makes some nice interfaces, I have the Delta 1010LT it has 2 mic inputs XLR, 8 unbalanced inputs, midi etc... , comes with software also, Ableton Live Lite music production software.
    Cascade makes some real nice mics! They make some nice ribbon Mics that aren't all that expensive as ribbons go!
     
  4. dynabite

    dynabite Senior Member

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    M-Audio also allows you to use Pro Tools since it too is made by Digidesign but I think you need TDM hardware for the Eventide software and such.
     
  5. Arjay

    Arjay Junior Member

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    Presonus Firepods kill everything else. Not sure if they are compatable with PCs though. Also if you do end up with a Firepod, use Cubase as your recording software...not ProTools.
     
  6. gmacdonnell

    gmacdonnell V.I.P. Member

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    M-Audio is very nice stuff.


    However, the Presonus interfaces are really incredible as well, (I actually prefer the tone of the preamp.)

    Even their basic USB interface sounds fantastic and comes with the very nice Cubase LE. Even the LE version of Cubase has many great plug-ins, every kind of effect from vintage to modern, and many sound nearly as good as standalone units. The "tube" feature is great for getting an old-school warmth, sound and feel for your tracks, but the time-based effects, (chorus, flange, delays and reverbs) are the best in their class.

    For $150, plus mics and stands, you'd have a very flexible, great-sounding setup.
     
  7. redlir

    redlir Senior Member

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    What is your budget?
     
  8. gravmy0

    gravmy0 Senior Member

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    Thanks for all the advice everyone and in terms of budget

    probably anywhere from 100-200 for the interface and 100-150 for the mic.

    Actually I don't know what the average price of a mic is... :laugh2:
     
  9. gmacdonnell

    gmacdonnell V.I.P. Member

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    In that case, the Presonus USB is probably the best-sounding option.

    As far as mics I'd highly recommend you check out ADK.

    They're the only recording mics in that budget that are used by professionals, high-quality and sound great.

    These $100-150 mics you see at Guitar Center and Musician's Friend all look good on paper, but I've never heard one that had a balanced, warm tone.
    I've never seen one in any decent studio, either.


    But an ADK A-51 is in that price range, and has a huge list of fans, including Ray Charles, Vince Gill, and the Rolling Stones.

    It sounds remarkably like a Neuman U-67: one of the most lauded (and expensive) microphones of all time. Several pro audio and recording magazines thought so too.

    ADK Condenser Microphones, Class A Condenser Studio Mic, Live and Broadcast, Retro-Sonic Mics, Project Studio Microphone

    I bought one as a "backup" to my Rode NT-1, and in all honesty I prefer its sound, and it's every bit as well made.

    I bring it to studios and the engineers in 3 cases have ordered some for themselves.

    They're harder to find, but well worth looking up.
     
  10. gravmy0

    gravmy0 Senior Member

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    Thanks for the extremely thorough reply.
    I'll take a look into presonus interfaces and keep an eye out for the ADK A-51 condenser microphone.

    I wish there was a function to thank people for posts the same way you would thank for thread creation.

    :applause:
     
  11. gmacdonnell

    gmacdonnell V.I.P. Member

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    No problem: I'm glad I could be of some help!

    I bought the presonus USB last year and keep it in my laptop case. I can record gigs, song ideas in a hotel room, or rehearsals.

    Presonus is known for their great-sounding preamps, and the USB interface has two built-in, and comes with very nice software.

    With that and a good mic or two, you could literally record an album that 10 years ago would have cost $10,000 or more to produce.


    BTW, ADK has a kit, the A-Twin Studio Microphone Pack, that bundles the ADK-51 with an SC-1 instrument mic for a really good deal.

    You can usually find them for $185-200, (like here ADK A-Twin Studio Microphone Mic Pack SC1 & A51 New! - eBay (item 360127686357 end time Feb-27-09 13:01:31 PST)) but you're getting nearly $300 of really sweet-sounding professional mics, plus a sturdy shock-mount.

    For the versatility, it's worth the extra 20 or so bucks in my opinion.:thumb:
     

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