So how do you mic your amp? -let the secrets pour-

Discussion in 'Recording Studio' started by johnnycash, Oct 3, 2008.

  1. johnnycash

    johnnycash Junior Member

    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2008
    So MLP family,

    how do you mic your amp?
    and how do you record it through the audio card?

    lets talk about your rig specifically to these categories!

    got any secrets to share? this is the thread!
     
  2. lp_junkie

    lp_junkie Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,573
    Likes Received:
    477
    Joined:
    May 24, 2008
    I use a Pro Tools computer based rig, and to record guitars I do several things.

    1. I set up a track that is mic'd with a Shure SM57 off axis on one of the 12's in a Marshall Cabinet and another SM57 about 5-6 ft away for a room sound.

    2. I have a direct out (emulated) on my particular head so that I can get a good signal to the interface.

    I then blend the two tracks for the final take, so you get direct signal mixed with a live sound, creating a pretty fat crunchy guitar track.
     
  3. Ekoms

    Ekoms Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,393
    Likes Received:
    19
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2008
    put your amp up against a fridge or washing machine, about enough room for the mic to fit in there, and then drop the mic where you hear a hotspot. this sounds best when another mic is there to capture the room tone as well.

    we currently have a professional producer that is a friend hellping us with our demo. I was blown away at how good it sounded even without another mic to get the room tone. You'll have to experiment with the mic placement a little bit, but I as astounded at the sound that played back through the monitors. I'll let you guys hear it when were done too

    Ekoms
     
  4. dtube

    dtube Senior Member

    Messages:
    334
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2008
    All computer recording starts with a good interface. Stock soundcards and those high-end gaming cards (Creative), are not acceptable. Nowadays, most interfaces (USB, FireWire, and PCI) come bundled with stripped-down, freebie versions of professional software recording packages. A very popular choice is the M-Audio USB interfaces that come as part of a package with ProTools LE. ProTools is kinda the defacto standard in recording studios. The only problem is you have to buy it with the Digidesign mfg'd interfaces (like M-Audio) since ProTools doesn't play ball with 3rd party interfaces. So, an entry-level USB interface with PT is a good stepping stone. EMU (the professional branch of Creative) makes some very hardy interfaces. I use their 1616M Cardbus (PCMCIA) package for mobile recording. In the PC world, there are several software packages that will work with most interfaces. I use Adobe Audition at work and Cakewalk Sonar at a friend's studio. Both are excellent, and stable, software packages. I prefer Sonar for music production and Audition for editing. The various interfaces I've mentioned typically have good mic preamps built in; but you can also run a mixer into the interface to mix-down more sources (just remember that you are limited on input channels to what is offered on your interface -most inexpensive units have two mic preamps/channels only).

    Recording is one of the most rewarding, yet expensive and frustrating hobbies a person can pursue. As you build your rig, you will find that improving audio quality means spending more money.
    -Darren
     
  5. kspeed

    kspeed Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,473
    Likes Received:
    13
    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2008
    I place mine on a 28 inch padded stool (no stand for me) about 6-9FT in front of the amp. I only record one amplified instrument at a time. I face it directly at the amp and angle it slightly upward - maybe 20 degrees up - from being directly in front of the given amp.

    This provides a pretty solid balance of frequencies without interfering. I'm also recording in a nearly soundproof room (14ft by 14ft) so the acoustics are pretty damn solid.
     
  6. b-squared

    b-squared Banned

    Messages:
    21,129
    Likes Received:
    9,168
    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    For live sound, I like having an SM57 off-axis on one speaker, and another mike with a big diaphragm on the other.

    Next week we're going to try the 57 with a Sennheiser and see how it sounds blended.

    BB
     
  7. dtube

    dtube Senior Member

    Messages:
    334
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2008
    Something to try that makes an amp sound effing huge is to mic the front with the typical 57; then mic the back (provided its an open-back cab or combo) with a 421, RE20, SM7, etc; then flip polarity on one of the mics and mix to taste. Makes some neat sonic real estate. I love tracking Fenders this way. Of course, this is a studio trick more than live sound; but if you have the inputs and some time to mess around, why not? :D
    -Darren
     
  8. Big John

    Big John So I'm standing in line at the bank, and I stick m V.I.P. Member

    Messages:
    6,955
    Likes Received:
    5,552
    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2007
    On a lazy session, I'll just hang a Sennheiser E609 in front of the speaker, somewhere between 5"-8" away from the center. This is how I mic it live, too. On a not-so-lazy session, the amp is put in the middle of the room. Then I'll use the 609 as usual (maybe a little closer to the cone) and then place a decent cardioid condenser mic about 10"-12" above one of the rear corners. For shits & giggles, I sometimes put another condenser about 12" directly behind the amp and then flip the phase on it.

    One time in my buddy's studio, we experimented with the mid-side technique for a solo because he had the equipment to make it happen. The guitar solo popped in the mix without any eq or volume adjustments, with slightly improved note clarity. Don't ask me the details on this technique, I don't remember.
     
  9. Extremerocker827

    Extremerocker827 Senior Member

    Messages:
    818
    Likes Received:
    15
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2008
    I have no idea how to record, lol. Whenever I record something, I just have my crappy computer microphone. I don't think it costs anything to record direct cuz my amp has a direct/line out thingy so maybe I can figure out how to record direct.
     
  10. dtube

    dtube Senior Member

    Messages:
    334
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2008
    I use M/S for recording choirs and music ensembles - love it. Basically, a mic with a figure-8 pattern is turned 90-degrees to the source; directly on top of (or below) that mic, the same type of mic in a cardioid pattern is aimed at the source. The two mics are then combined in-polarity to create the left channel; then they are combined with polarity inverted to create the right channel. If done right, it creates a beautiful, accurate, stereo soundfield. Plus, either side is completely mono compatible. You can use a reverse M/S matrix on a normal stereo signal to extract the center/mono channel to process it differently then the unquiquely stereo material. That is a common trick used in mastering to get the vocals in dense mixes to pop. I love using M/S on ambient mics for drums (about 6' out from center and 5' off the floor...IF you have a good sounding room) and on pianos.
    -Darren
     
  11. Big John

    Big John So I'm standing in line at the bank, and I stick m V.I.P. Member

    Messages:
    6,955
    Likes Received:
    5,552
    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2007
    Bingo, that's it. It's a great option to have for "popping" sound sources in the mix.
     

Share This Page