Slash chords examples in songs?

Discussion in 'Guitar Lessons' started by To Need a Woman, Sep 9, 2015.

  1. To Need a Woman

    To Need a Woman Senior Member

    Messages:
    260
    Likes Received:
    28
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2015
    Generally speaking (probably because they're not as common as regular 3 note chords), I don't think people are very good at hearing which type of slash chord is being played. Yes, I can tell immediately if it's a slash chord as should anyone - but after that I assume that I'd struggle to tell the difference between lets say a major chord with the 3rd in the bass (Maj/3rd), from a maj chord with the 5th in the bass (Maj/5th). I haven't really paid much attention to it, but for all I know, this could be as hard for me as it was telling the difference between a diminished chord and a 7th chord.

    Haven't come across many minor slash chords yet. Would be interested in hearing some examples from songs?? And examples of major slash chords are welcome too.

    I know that it's normally easy with common uses such as (G - D/F# - Em) on guitar; but it's not always this easy. But should most guitarists know which type of slash chord is being played (Maj/2nd, Maj/3rd, Maj/4th, Maj/5th, Maj/7th) without having heard it in context?

    I've tried a few. The Maj/4th sounds extra happy, and if I'm correct the Maj/3rd sounds a bit sad... or at least it does here at 2:03 with the proceeding C maj chord: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ygny5NpgNRY

    As far as I'm aware, the Maj/3rd and the Maj/5th aren't ambiguous and therefore hopefully can't be interpreted in different ways. However the Maj/7th chord and the Maj/2nd & Maj/4th chords contain the same notes as 7th chords and suspended chords, but I don't think they ear would mistake them for their slash versions.

    You can also see Christopher Cross play an A Maj/3rd here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PM4he3eMzQk

    Thank you
     
  2. jamdogg

    jamdogg Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,037
    Likes Received:
    480
    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2012
    :slash: -chords.


    :laugh2:

    Sorry, couldn't resist.
     
    2 people like this.
  3. To Need a Woman

    To Need a Woman Senior Member

    Messages:
    260
    Likes Received:
    28
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2015
    Don't be sorry, just try not to troll in the lessons section. Why not go off and discuss amps, or pick-ups in a forum you're more familiar with.

    Good lad:thumb:
     
    Who likes this.
  4. JonR

    JonR Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,862
    Likes Received:
    2,548
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2010
    All slash chords have an unstable, unresolved sound, but of course different qualities and uses.

    I'd separate them into inversions (3rd, 5th or 7th on bottom), and - er - others; i.e. with non-chord tones in the bass (scale degrees 2, 4, 6, or alterations). Some of the latter are simply alternative ways of viewing more complex chords.


    MAJOR CHORD INVERSIONS

    1st inversion (3rd on bottom): normally a passing chord, implying a scale-wise bass line (eg, the common G - D/F# - Em example you mentioned).

    2nd inversion (5th on bottom): classically a dissonance resembling a suspended V chord.
    Eg, classical theory calls C/G a "6/4" chord (because of the G-E 6th interval and the G-C 4th), and treats it as we might a Gsus chord: leading to G and then resolving to C.
    But also used like 1st inversion as part of a sequence with a scale-wise bass line, usually descending (eg, Am - C/G - F etc).
    On its own, a 2nd inversion major triad sounds very consonant. Just not quite as resolved as root position.

    3rd inversion (7th on bottom). The most unstable inversion. As with the above two, normally used with scalewise bass lines. Of course the b7 sounds very different from the maj7, but both will normally strongly imply a bass descent by half or whole step.


    MINOR CHORD INVERSIONS

    1st inversion (3rd on bottom). Sounds very like a major 6th chord. More consonant than 1st inversion major chord.

    2nd inversion (5th on bottom). Similar role and use to 2nd inversion major chord.

    3rd inversion (7th on bottom). Identical to a 2nd inversion major 6th chord. E.g., Am7/G = C6/G.


    NON-CHORD TONES IN BASS

    Maj/2: resembles (and functions as) a 9sus4. Eg, C/D = D9sus4 (more or less)

    Maj/4: resembles (and functions as) a maj9. Eg C/F = Fmaj9 (more or less)

    Maj/6: Identical to a root position min7 chord. C/A = Am7

    Min/2: Resembles a susb9. Cm/D = D7sus4b9 ("Dsusb9" for short. Lacks the 5th of the complete chord.) Sometimes used as a jazz phrygian chord, sometimes as a kind of V chord (resolving to G or Gm).

    Min/4: similar to Maj/2. Cm/F = F7sus2.

    Min/6: identical to m7b5 (half-dim). Cm/A = Am7b5


    ALTERATIONS IN BASS
    (mostly of little use, therefore uncommon - with one exception!)

    Maj/b2. C/Db = Dbmaj7#11#9 (!) (Possible harmonisation from Ab harmonic minor scale.) I've seen a chord like this in a Wayne Shorter tune - but nowhere else.

    Maj/#2 or b3. C/D#, C/Eb. D# or Eb aug triad with b9. Possible harmonisation from HW dim scale, so could be partial 7alt chord (R-3-#5-b9), but lacks 7th.

    Maj/#4 or b5. C/F#, C/Gb. Again, a partial 7alt chord (R-b5-b7-b9) but lacks 3rd.

    Maj/#5 or b6. C/G#, C/Ab. Maj7#5. Possible III chord from harmonic or melodic minor. (2nd chord in Stairway to Heaven intro)

    Min/b2. Cm/Db. Partial Maj9#11 (R-7-9-#11). (Db lydian chord).

    Min/maj3. Cm/E. Weird. Doubt you'll ever hear one of these!

    Min/#4 or b5. Cm/F#, Cm/Gb. Another strange harmonisation from the dim scale.

    Min/b6. Cm/Ab = Abmaj7. Common!
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. jamdogg

    jamdogg Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,037
    Likes Received:
    480
    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2012
    Panties in a bunch much? :cool:
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. Mindfrigg

    Mindfrigg Senior Member

    Messages:
    54,572
    Likes Received:
    293,496
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2010
    Yes please. This is serious bidness.
     
    frankv and colchar like this.
  7. JonR

    JonR Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,862
    Likes Received:
    2,548
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2010
  8. SteveGangi

    SteveGangi V.I.P. Member

    Messages:
    29,542
    Likes Received:
    53,614
    Joined:
    May 20, 2010
    The old folk standard Mister Bo Jangles

    C
    C/B
    C/A
    C/G
    F
    G

    etc
     
    Thumpalumpacus likes this.
  9. To Need a Woman

    To Need a Woman Senior Member

    Messages:
    260
    Likes Received:
    28
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2015
  10. JonR

    JonR Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,862
    Likes Received:
    2,548
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2010
    1 person likes this.
  11. To Need a Woman

    To Need a Woman Senior Member

    Messages:
    260
    Likes Received:
    28
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2015
    A nice maj/3rd (E/G#) used here at 1:28:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PB3V92g9tPI

    I actually didn't know what it was first... because if the G# was viewed as the root, the two interval one is aware of are the m6th and the m3rd. So I would have realised it was a major chord.
     
  12. dmoss74

    dmoss74 Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,342
    Likes Received:
    615
    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2015
    i literally didn't have to hit the link to know that was going to be it. brilliant minds, and all. :)

    an entire head section of slash chords, and a preponderance in the verses/choruses, as well. and one of the best (imho) guitar tracks ever recorded. amos garrett, ftw. and geoff muldaur is no slouch, either.
     
  13. To Need a Woman

    To Need a Woman Senior Member

    Messages:
    260
    Likes Received:
    28
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2015
  14. To Need a Woman

    To Need a Woman Senior Member

    Messages:
    260
    Likes Received:
    28
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2015
  15. To Need a Woman

    To Need a Woman Senior Member

    Messages:
    260
    Likes Received:
    28
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2015
  16. To Need a Woman

    To Need a Woman Senior Member

    Messages:
    260
    Likes Received:
    28
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2015
    Another question - been listening to 'Your Song'.

    Anyone know how he make the G/B chord work at 0:33? Given that it's in the key of Eb? It fits in very nicely between Bb & Cm with the chromatic walk up. But G wouldn't even be in the parallel minor key to Eb.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DIT7S87E3vI
     
  17. huw

    huw V.I.P. Member

    Messages:
    3,491
    Likes Received:
    4,704
    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2007
    Secondary dominant to the Cm.

    :naughty:
     
  18. To Need a Woman

    To Need a Woman Senior Member

    Messages:
    260
    Likes Received:
    28
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2015
    I'm afraid I don't know what that means?
     
  19. To Need a Woman

    To Need a Woman Senior Member

    Messages:
    260
    Likes Received:
    28
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2015
    It seems as if people interpreted this thread as asking what slash chords are! as opposed to being able to hear what they are.

    It seems that apart from the C\G & D\F#, that guitarists don't really play slash chords that often. For example, how come the --5x777x-- OR --55777X-- shape isn't utilised that often?
     
  20. huw

    huw V.I.P. Member

    Messages:
    3,491
    Likes Received:
    4,704
    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2007
    Sorry. It means that for just that moment in the song we can pretend that the key is C minor. It isn't, but if it was then G > Cm would be V > i . Dominant to tonic minor. All that a secondary dominant is, is just that: the chord that would be dominant if the next chord was tonic. It just adds a bit of a push to the chord changes.

    It works, as you noted, by chromatic voice leading:

    Bb > Cm...

    F > G
    D > Eb
    Bb > C

    Adding a G chord makes the voices change individually, rather than all at once...

    F > G > G
    D > D > Eb
    Bb > B > C

    ...one voice moves, then is still, one is still, then moves, and the last makes two small moves.
     

Share This Page