ReWind Electric "Vintage Pickup Repairs Photo Thread" (eye candy central)

Discussion in 'Vendor Classifieds' started by cooljuk, Jul 3, 2016.

  1. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    That's so early in the pickup history of Gibson pickups that I could only speculate. From looking at the coil, it does appear to have a very even and deliberate pattern to it. Also interesting is the way the coil start was constructed on that one. The start lead went though the bobbin into the inside of the coil and wrapped around the bobbin nearly a full turn, just like PAFs. Only in this case it was a AWG 20 or so cloth covered braided wire, like a Fender pickup would have, so it was a VERY significant factor in the overall shape of the coil.








    In more modern vintage Gibson single coil pickup history - I just love these bobbins! Not the most amazing sounding P-90s, but still a very cool jangly sound and they look so damn cool!

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  2. Kris Ford

    Kris Ford Senior Member

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    I love these, have had them in a '72 SG Pro (the funky Special for it's year), and thought they were killer.
    They had the Gibson embossed covers as well.
    MANY a late 60's Goldtop went out the door with those..
     
  3. jbash

    jbash Senior Member

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    This thread wins the internet. Please continue!
     
  4. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    Your wish is my command.



    Notice how the insulation tubing on this mid-1950's Gibson harness does NOT have fraying cloth fibers sticking out of the ends and making it look like a project from Michael's Crafts. That's always been a personal hangup of mine. I hate finding offcuts from Fender amp wire used for insulation tubing in supposedly vintage-accurate or replica products. Even the super expensive Luxe stuff isn't right, either. The reason is that rubberized or varnished glass fibers don't fray. Cotton frays. Waxed cotton frays. Lacquered cotton frays. Shellac'd cotton frays. Varnished cotton frays.

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    An early 1950's harness with brown insulation:

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    Even when cut at a sharp angle, exposing the end fibers for 60 years in a heavily giggle hollowbody - no fraying.
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    Here's a 1959 Gibson harness with the yellow leads for comparison. Same deal. No fraying ends.

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    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNk7OM5OypE[/ame]
     
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  5. Sct13

    Sct13 Gold Supporter Premium Member

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    Man ALL my ends are frayed!!!

    But this is good info, thanx for posting
     
  6. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    Here's one that really really wants to fray, but just can't bring it self to do co.

    I think I actually caused this one by being a little have handed with it, knowing it was to be replaced.

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  7. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    There was a time when even Duncan used plain enamel wire.

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    Pretty easy to guess what was wrong with this coil. It took a good bashing on the side and caused a bunch of opens and shorts.
     
  8. reedy

    reedy Senior Member

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    Hey James,
    When is the earliest you've seen the yellow insulation wire used by Gibson? I know they started using in mid '59 for sure but I've also seen it on some '58 harnesses and always thought that was strange.

    Wicked thread by the way!
     
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  9. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    Thanks, man!

    I think, 1959? I'll have to look through a bunch of old photos but I don't think I've seen it earlier.

    That said, no doubt there were necks serialized in 1958 that left the factory on guitars completed in 1959. No surprises with Kalamazoo Gibson.

    The yellow stuff always sounds better, of course! ;)
     
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  10. jbash

    jbash Senior Member

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    Duncan is no longer using plain enamel? Not trying to start a poop storm, but they sure claim it on several pickups....all the vintagey stuff....59s..seths..wlh..pearlies..ants..etc.
     
  11. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    They used to use it exclusively.


    FWIW, I don't think it matters as much on potted pickups or hotter wound humbucker coils. Wire diameter and insulation thickness still make more of a difference than insulation type on those. On unpotted lower-to-medium wound coil humbuckers, and on single coils, it makes quite a very noticeable difference. You don't need "golden ears" to hear it in a direct A/B comparison. On something like a Super Distortion, or an even hotter wound humbucker to a greater extent, - ya, there is still a sonic difference between poly and PE, but it's far less significant. On PAFs - they can sound just like T-Tops, if re-wound with poly insulated magnet wire, totally loosing their original voice.

    btw - There are other differences between the old Duper Distortions and the new ones besides the insulation type, as well, so comparing a 70's SD to a modern one isn't really a comparison of coil wire insulation alone.








    Here's an early plain enamel wire wound Gibson '57 Classic. This isn't the purple-dyed-poly wire that the majority of them have, but true plain enamel insulation. Still wax potted (well, one coil still is lol!), unfortunately, but I think these sound SO much nicer than the later ones. I would say that the early '57 Classics with the PE wire are my favorite sounding Gibson humbucker since the early T-Tops. I'd love to add an unpotted one to my collection!

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    Check it out - Gibson even used the start wire hole on the bobbin like they are supposed to. For most of the modern era on all the pickups they neglected to do this and hooked up the start wire after the coil was wound like T-Tops. Now they have started using the start wire hole again, on some models, but still do it wrong - or, at least, not like PAFs did.
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    I do it pure PAF style, personally.
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  12. jbash

    jbash Senior Member

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    Keep on Keeping on, James- love the thread and the 411 :)
     
  13. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    Look at this beautiful rainbow colored magnet from a 1959 PAF!

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    Putting that massive steel crossslide from a milling machine under the meter keeps the Earth's magnetic field from interfering with measurements. The meter is sensitive enough to pick that natural field up.
     
  14. musicmaniac

    musicmaniac Senior Member

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    Very cool!
     
  15. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    Some Kay "Kleenex Box" pickups from a 60's Airline Swingmaster.

    Basically a P-90 design but the inside core of the bobbins are larger, making the inner part of the coil wider and the coil is also slightly taller. Additionally, there is greater mass in the larger steel keeper bar and larger adjustable pole pieces (and two more steel screws going though the coil for securing the covers to the brass mounting bracket).

    So how to they sound? Awesome!! Like fuller bigger P-90s that are also a little brighter at the same time. I'd love to have a set in a guitar!



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    Look at the play wear on the corner of the clear acrylic cover. This guitar was a workhorse!

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    If my present avatar wasn't so shimmery and awesome, this would be my new one!
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  16. Kris Ford

    Kris Ford Senior Member

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    James, can we expand on this? I'm a vintage Super D nut, and would love to know your findings. mine all have the 3 holes on the bobbins, 3 square tabs, 2 triangle tabs..all killer!

    What would the be comparison between old and new?

    My prized MEGA early minty Super Distortion..a MONSTER!
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    Naturally, I pair them with PAFs...do those have A5 mags, and how would a swap to A2 or something else sound?
     
  17. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    Some differences between old and new SD pickups that are sonically significant are the coil pattern and the magnets. The magnet type may technically be the same but they do seem to sound rather different when swapping under the same coils.

    SD magnets are ceramic (and a different size/shape than PAF and other typical humbucker bar magnets) so swapping them to AlNiCo would significantly change their voice and be very difficult without having an AlNiCo magnet of appropriate size. To theorize though, you'd loose output and treble by large degrees, especially with A2.

    Here's one of mine:
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  18. Kris Ford

    Kris Ford Senior Member

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    Right on, would never swap a Super D mag, more-so was meaning an A2 in a Dimarzio PAF.
     
  19. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    Vintage DiMarzio PAFs do have similar size magnets to PAF and more typical humbucker bar magnets so you could do that. Here's an image of one I repaired, showing the magnet and arrangement inside:

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    How it would sound with your A2 will depend on the particular A2, as A2s seem to have more variance from one to the next (foundry, batch, size, charge, etc.) than most other AlNiCo types. It's an easy swap though and won't require any non-reversible work. Give it a whirl and see if you like it!
     
  20. Kris Ford

    Kris Ford Senior Member

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    Right on, I probably will! Would A3 or A4 be better choice for a drippy, flutey neck tone?
    The DM PAFs were A5, correct?
     

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