ReWind Electric "Vintage Pickup Repairs Photo Thread" (eye candy central)

Discussion in 'Vendor Classifieds' started by cooljuk, Jul 3, 2016.

  1. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    I don't know why I didn't do this long ago. The title says it all.

    Nothin to sell here, just pure eye candy for my fellow fans of crusty copper, stained steel, nicked nickel, brutal butyrate, mangled magnets and f#cked up Forbon!

    Free fun in the Vendor Classifieds, baby!

    Here's some money shots of pre-T-Top PAF bobbin patent decal humbucker bobbins.

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    Look just to the left of the "C" on the top one. In the glare of the light, you can see the TOOLING marks from the machinist who made the molds. Tell me that s#it ain't cool! That brings you right back to the very moment the steel chipped off the mold forming the shape of the bobbins to come and make history. That was never expected to be seen by human eyes, much less enjoyed by many (ok, maybe "few," whatever.) with such high regard for a simple little part. It's similar to imagining prehistoric man knapping a piece of flint into a knife. Ok, maybe not quite that epic but still both "early manufacturing." :cool:




    These pickups had a hard life. I think they were exposed to solvent at some point, which fused the coil wire insulation to itself and the bobbins. It was very difficult to separate. Nearly a solid block of plastic with some copper in it.

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    Here's some 1966 Fender Jazzmaster pickups. Both got a copper shielding treatment.
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    ...and just one more pickup for tonight....

    Here's the rewinding of a Rickenbacker 4001 Bass pickup. Probably my personal favorite rock bass sound. I think a great deal of the sound is the iron pole pieces and the ferrite magnet. They have a very wide pickup pattern and work great on guitars, too! I had another 70's 4001 pickup in an SG bridge for a while (but it wasn't my pickup and I eventually gave it back). I'd do it again!


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    I had to make this wooden jig for the first one I rewound. It's come in handy many times since, even for other types of pickups.
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    Attached Files:

  2. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    One of the things that I've always found "industrially beautiful" is the tiger striping on the casings of the Centralab pots. It's from drawing the metal into shape over a die, I'm most certain. I love it!

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  3. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    1968 Les Paul Custom on the bench...

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    Jer, Kris Ford, RAG7890 and 3 others like this.
  4. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    Everybody loves a 1959 PAF, right?

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  5. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    Total restoration of a 1953 Gibson ES-295 dogear P-90s and harness.

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    cleaned it aaaaall.
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    after
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    Wish I had some before photos of the covers and tuning machines. They were naaaaaaaasty. The covers had been painted red!
     
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  6. DavidRamey

    DavidRamey Senior Member

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    Great job James. Looks like NOS.
     
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  7. Kris Ford

    Kris Ford Senior Member

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    I LOVE THIS THREAD!!

    James, my old school machinist buddy here at work thinks the L tool marks are from a clamping jig used when the hole was made, and he wondered if Gibson may have used a "drap"...a combination drill and tap to make the threaded hole in one operation. (makes sense from a manufacturing standpoint)


    Keep 'em coming!

    Might you be able to show us how to do a re-lead? :fingersx:
     
  8. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    Thanks, man!

    L marks on baseplate feet are present on a bunch of different baseplates from different manufacturers and time periods. Even the modern cheapo "short legs and 12 holes" baseplates have them. It's a matter of how the tooling was designed.

    At one point, a factory machinist told me brand name of the stamping machine that likely did the multi-step baseplate stamping for Gibson in the 50's. The name was something that reminded me of an English church or abbey, but I can't find it in my notes, atm.

    I use both drill/tap and drill/ream combination bits in my presses for different uses. There's a really cool place in SC that will make any bit one can imagine. I've also made some combination face/part/chamfer cutting tools for my lathe, which I use on slugs.

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    Here's a few of the best photos you'll ever see of L marks on feet, since we're on the subject. ;)

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  9. reedy

    reedy Senior Member

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    So , so cool. Thanks for sharing.
     
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  10. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    Subscribe to this thread! I'm going to keep posting new vintage repair photos DAILY, as much as I can.

    I want anyone else who enjoys this sort of thing to be able to do so. It's a rare treat that we get to look inside at the little details of music manufacturing history. Especially, if you don't do this sort of thing for a living. This is for public record of history and enjoyment!



    ok, who knows this one?

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  11. musicmaniac

    musicmaniac Senior Member

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    Very cool....thanks for sharing!
     
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  12. reedy

    reedy Senior Member

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    It's an old Fender pickup, right? Well half of one. I forget what these were called but essentially like a p-bass style pickup for guitar. At least I think so anyway...
     
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  13. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    Exactly. Fender Electric XII :thumb:

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  14. reedy

    reedy Senior Member

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    So what's the benefit to making a pickup this way as opposed to a straight 6 pole pickup like a tele or strat?
     
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  15. kakerlak

    kakerlak Senior Member

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    What would the difference b/w series and parallel wiring be b/w coils with them split b/w different strings? (Or am I being stupid, lol?)
     
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  16. geetarfreek82

    geetarfreek82 Senior Member

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    I had a '65 Fender Electric XII.... The factory pickups sounded horrible. :rofl: They could've used an update
     
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  17. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    They cancel hum.

    Essentially the same as changing from parallel to series in a typical humbucker. All your strings are covered either way.

    That's exactly why I was working on that full set. They have some problems picking up all the strings evenly (not because of the split coils) and they don't have much in the "guts" department. 1/4" steel reflector/jumper plates and some jumper/extender blades on the top fixed that right up! Here's some photos showing what I did...

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    This made a WORLD of difference and I highly recommend it for anyone who doesn't care for the pickup characteristics of the Electric XII pickups. The client said it changed his guitar from a case queen to a regular bigger.


    I had a problem of my safety goggles or face shield getting a little foggy and so I was unaware the camera was a little out of focus. Sorry for that blur in some of the work photos.
     
  18. kakerlak

    kakerlak Senior Member

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    Didn't these (and I think I remember this from another of your posts) have little jumper wires across the poles from factory that tend to corrode away to nothing? I'm picturing like plain guitar string gauge stuff.
     
  19. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    Yes, the high-E side poles had little jumpers from the factory. Fender was well aware of this problem at the time, obviously.

    Here's one, not very effective one:
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    This one fell away entirely:
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  20. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member MLP Vendor

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    PAF from a 1960 LP. They didn't spare any room on that bobbin, right? This one didn't read particularly hot, either. Just goes to show the variance of wire thickness and the misleading nature of DCR regarding guitar pickup coils.

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