Restoring a Stanley Hand Plane - Video

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Barnaby, Mar 12, 2016.

  1. akwusmc

    akwusmc Senior Member

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    As much as I like Mr Sellers, I have to disagree with that assessment. The secondary bevel is what you should be resharpening, theoretically until it eclipses the primary bevel before you rehone the entire iron. A thicker irons' advantages don't really relate to how sharp or how fast you can sharpen it, but rather in resisting chatter.

    aw
     
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  2. Windir

    Windir Junior Member

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    Thanks for information. I have bought a sharpening jig from local store, because i want to be sure i won´t ruin the blade.

    And same in Finnish:
    Kiitos perehdytyksestä. Ostin teroitusohjurin Plektra tradingista jonkin aikaa sitten, kun en ole aivan varma, että saanko aikaan edes siedettävää teroitusjälkeä.
     
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  3. HEADKNOCKER

    HEADKNOCKER Senior Member

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    Here's the Link to Ron Hock's Tools & plane irons..
    http://www.hocktools.com/
    I'm gonna order myself several for the ones I use most, And I have a couple dozen extras that great grandpaw had in his old tool chests..
    Thanks for the knowledge Barnaby
     
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  4. Barnaby

    Barnaby Premium Member

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    I've been working away on my collection of planes a bit, and finally managed (following a couple of lucky eBay finds in the UK) to complete the collection of English-made Stanley smooth-soled bench planes. According to the tool catalogues I've consulted, Stanley made the following in England: #3, #4, #4 1/2, #5, #5 1/2, #6, #7 and the two rabbeting bench planes #10 and #10 1/2. Here's my collection:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I am told that there was not considered to be sufficient demand for the #1, #2 and #8 in the UK, and people who wanted them just bought them from the US. There are rumours that the #5 1/4 (often called the "junior jack plane") may have been made briefly in England, but I have never come across one, and it is not listed in any of the catalogues I have seen.

    The other Stanley bench plane was the #10 1/4, but this was never made in the UK. It is a very rare tool and has tilting handles and a rabbet blade. Actually, the rabbet bench planes are interesting. They're nice to use. Here's my #10:

    [​IMG]

    This is basically a jack plane with a blade that goes right across. This one is a later Stanley and has some minor consistency issues, but I can fix those with no difficulty. Silly QC-related things like the paint being too thick on the bottom of the frog so that it doesn't seat easily. Also, it has ugly plastic handles that will be replaced soon.

    This is the #10 1/2, which is a smoothing plane. I believe these are a lot rarer than the #10 models. It's earlier than my #10 and considerably nicer. No issues at all with this one:

    [​IMG]
     
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  5. Barnaby

    Barnaby Premium Member

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    Another thing worth mentioning is that the larger smoothing and jack planes (the #4 1/2 and #5 1/2) seem to have been slightly more popular in the UK than the US. This might be because they were similar in heft and size to the older infill planes. The #5 1/2 is my favourite size of plane, and I have more than one!

    This is the Stanley version, probably from the 1960s:

    [​IMG]

    Although it hasn't been restored yet beyond a basic cleaning and sharpening, I have tried it with the original blade and cap iron and the modern Hock replacements. In both cases, it does an excellent job as a large smoother and jointer.

    I also have a modern Bedrock-style by Quangsheng (WoodRiver/Juuma/Luban/etc...). It's clearly a high-quality plane, but I am having trouble with it. For some reason, I just can't seem to get a good edge on the iron. It keeps crumbling and gives a finish like a rough rasp on the wood. After sharpening and re-sharpening many times, I eventually ground off a couple of mm to try again with fresher steel, but, while the edge has improved slightly, the problems persist. It could be my ineptitude in sharpening, but I suspect it's a dud and may need either re-tempering or simply to be replaced. Other than that, the plane is pretty good and works well with a Hock iron in. I will probably get #5 1/2s by Clifton and Lie Nielsen in the future to add to the stable and have them all set up for different tasks.

    [​IMG]
     
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  6. KnightroExpress

    KnightroExpress Senior Member

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    I've had a similar issue with my Woodriver plane, the blade just does not want to cooperate. I'm going to replace it with a Hock blade/iron set soon, I think.
     
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  7. Barnaby

    Barnaby Premium Member

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    That's really worth knowing - thank you! I was honestly worried that it was my problem...

    [​IMG]
     
  8. KnightroExpress

    KnightroExpress Senior Member

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    Likewise! I know I'm not great at sharpening, but I also know I'm not nearly as hopeless as this blade makes me look. With a proper blade and iron swapped in, I think this will be a very nice plane.
     
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  9. HEADKNOCKER

    HEADKNOCKER Senior Member

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    I just found that Woodcraft has the Hock & Pinnacle replacement blades in stock & there's one 20 minutes from my home..
    Thought I'd give the link..
    Plane Blades - Woodcraft.com
     
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  10. Barnaby

    Barnaby Premium Member

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    Go get 'em! :thumb:

    I need to grab a bunch sometime. Not just yet, however. Perhaps I should give my wallet time to recover.

    Besides, man is not made of planes alone. There's that new EHX Mellotron pedal that just came out as well...:naughty:
     
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  11. Skyjerk

    Skyjerk Meatbomb

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    [​IMG]
     
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  12. HEADKNOCKER

    HEADKNOCKER Senior Member

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    I still miss the Electro Harmonix Muff Fuzz I had as a teenager & paid $20..

    Today I made a 2x4 into a rack for my squares & am now working on mounting a 60 year old craftsman jigsaw onto a plate to mount into my router table..

    I didn't see a Hock blade listed for the No2 stanley or Bedrock No602 but if I took it with me they'll have it, better have $100 to drop on it & the chip breaker though..
    I really need one for my Bailey No6 first.. Plus I need to buy some wood & the financial advisors are telling me to hold off for now..

    Getting some lunch..

    The GC near me has a Vintage Morley 1970s Rotating Wah Effect Pedal for $399
    Vintage Morley 1970s Rotating Wah Effect Pedal | Guitar Center
     
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  13. HEADKNOCKER

    HEADKNOCKER Senior Member

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    I see that EHX Mel9 has organ sounds
    We have three different keyboards with all those sounds, My son can play them..
    If I had a midi guitar we could use his old synth & create almost what that pedal does.
    It does look pretty cool & will test drive one next trip to a music store..
     
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  14. Ripthorn

    Ripthorn Senior Member

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    I am making an infill out of a busted Stanley #4. The infill is really curly maple. In order to smooth it, I had to bust out one of my little 55 degree smoothers. I was using planes I made to make more planes. Then those planes will help make guitars and amps so that I can play music I wrote on a guitar I built using planes and other tools I made through pedals I made into an amp I made. Where does it end? Well, I draw the line at mining my own ore. Doing my own forging isn't completely out of the question, though...

    As a side note, i should probably try a 4 1/2 at some point...
     
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  15. Skyjerk

    Skyjerk Meatbomb

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    If you can somehow use the music you made on the guitar that you made using the plane that you made, and make a busted Stanley #4 with it, then you can bring the whole thing full circle :)
     
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  16. poro78

    poro78 Noble savage Premium Member

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    I have a crappy and busted Memo #5 (if I remember right) that might be an infill plane in distant future.
    Sweet plastic (cracked) handles and sloppy hardware, won't shed a tear when I wreck it up.

    If only my to-do list was shorter... :rolleyes:
     
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  17. Ripthorn

    Ripthorn Senior Member

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    Does it count if I listen to the music I made on the guitar that I made using the planes that I made while making the infill? If so, then it's full circle! :)
     
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  18. HEADKNOCKER

    HEADKNOCKER Senior Member

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    Here's the Paul Seller's video I watched the other night about restoring a plane..
    It's a long video but has lots of great tips & info..
    This is the one where He shortened the totes bolt to get it tight..
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYyV6IUpsYk#t=13

    This is the same guy in Poro's video..
    I need to really do this technique on all of my planes & get & keep them razor sharp..
    A couple diamond or water stones wouldn't hurt either..

    I'll share a picture in my thread of the water stone I found in grandpaws tools, It's so lumpy that it looks like a brick, I found another small stone new in the box for sharpening a razor..
     
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  19. jkes01

    jkes01 Senior Member

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    ^ Just watched that video last night. Great videos. He has a series on building a workbench, just wish I had more room :cool:
     
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  20. Barnaby

    Barnaby Premium Member

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    I contacted the guys at Workshop Heaven in the UK. They told me that the blades for these Quangshengs are very close to optimum tempering, and some come out a little too much, so the 'crumbling' thing can happen. They suggested I sharpen at 35 degrees.

    I did this and it seemed to solve the problem. The edge now has the integrity it simply didn't possess at 30 degrees.

    It's a good solution for me, as I now own four (yes, FOUR :wow:) 5-1/2-sized bench planes, so can have each one set up differently, and a heavy Bedrock-style like this with a 35-degree angle is kind of useful, but, if it was the only plane I had, I'd feel really annoyed...then go and buy a Hock iron.

    Here's the 5-1/2 family:

    [​IMG]

    From left to right, they are by Record, Clifton, Quangsheng and Stanley. Even though they are all the same basic size, they are all quite different. Part of this is due to weight (with the Clifton and Quangsheng being noticeably heavier), but there are many other factors, such as the thickness of the cutting iron, the type of cap iron, the feel of the handles, the overall balance and the construction of the frog.

    I weakened and bought a Clifton recently. I shouldn't have, but I've wanted one forever, and the model I wanted was becoming scarce, so time was running out. This exact plane was discontinued in 2014, after the company was sold to new owners. The company's new planes have different irons (cryogenic) and are a gray/black colour. This one is British Racing Green and has a hammer-forged blade. I managed to get what is probably almost the last new-old-stock one for sale anywhere.

    [​IMG]

    I'm sure the post-takeover ones are just as good, but what can I say?

    Oh - the Record plane is interesting as well:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    According to the type study, it was made sometime between 1946 and 1952 and is stamped "Hull Ed Comm". I'm guessing that this stands for "Kingston on Hull Education Committee". This was an administrative group in Yorkshire. The name was used from the early 1950s and they were responsible for education, including vocational training. Therefore, I think this plane was probably used at a technical college in Hull. It's amazing that it's still in such good shape if so.

    There's one more I want to add to this collection of 5 1/2 planes...a Lie-Nielsen. I'll wait, however, until I'm either in the US or a friend is coming back with space in their luggage. I'm tired of taking massive hits for postage all the time.

    To be honest, I wanted to get a L-N before I got a Quangsheng, as the latter apparently started out as a ripoff of the former (they've since evolved), but a good deal came up on a Quangsheng and I jumped on it. Oh well...Lie Nielsen will, eventually, get my money.
     
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