Recording To PC

Discussion in 'Guitar Lessons' started by Stoli, Jan 8, 2018.

  1. Stoli

    Stoli Senior Member

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    I listen to the takes that several of you guys do on the BOTM. Some great guitar playing there and good quality recordings too. I am getting ready to buy a new computer as the one I have was the stuff in 2009 but not so much anymore. I want to buy something that will accomodate the gadgets and software to make the clear recordings that some of you all get. I mostly just want to listen to what I sound like playing. I would like to be able to record me just playing my guitar or to layer my guitar over a backing track, or lay down my own chord progression and then play over that.

    I am under the impression that you can do that sort of thing with this box and the software that comes with it.

    https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/Scarlet2i2G2

    If you can do amp and pedal emulations then that would be a bonus. I play along with the BOTMs but really have no idea how to record the mix. One thing that I have learned with guitar that is frustrating is that you really do not know what you sound like when playing. I am mostly a strummer and dabble with trying to use simple scales to play over the top of things.

    Anyhow, if any of you tech guys can reccomend PC specs to look for and relatively inexpensive hardware and software that would make all this work it would be much appreciated. I am not interested in MAC stuff as it does not work well with other things that I do on a computer. I would most likely buy a desktop Dell and would like to know memory, sound cards, or other specs necessary to make this sort of thing work well with minimum hassle.
     
  2. DotStudio

    DotStudio Senior Member

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    Everything I record is with a 2i2 and the included software (ableton lite). It's pretty easy to get up and running. My system is nothing special, so I'm sure any reasonably spec'd new machine will do. I'd check the Scarlet system requirements and go a bit higher.

    Someone will probably have a different opinion shortly :rofl:
     
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  3. parts

    parts Senior Member

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    I built an I7 a couple years ago..I record with a cheapie M Audio through a old Pod Pro.. Sometimes I use a 8 year old Lenovo Lap Top..
    Still sounds the same..

    Seems ok to me..never any problems.. Does not require much power..decent RAM amount..
     
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  4. Pop1655

    Pop1655 Premium Member

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    2i2 and Reaper
     
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  5. Stoli

    Stoli Senior Member

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    Sounds like these things do not require a ton of memory to work.
     
  6. DotStudio

    DotStudio Senior Member

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    Rule of thumb when I was getting into it was that you wanted at least 4 Gigs. If you're going PC, memory is so cheap I'd go 8 GB at least.
     
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  7. jeff_farkas

    jeff_farkas Senior Member

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    I use something similar. Presonus Audiobox USB and Studio One Artist edition. I connect my amp to the Audiobox via H&K redbox. My PC has a quad core and 16Gb of RAM. Works just fine.

    Jeff
     
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  8. jeff_farkas

    jeff_farkas Senior Member

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    Let me now expand on my previous post..

    My current hardware specs(PC)
    OS - Windows 10 64bit

    CPU – AMD A8-6600K – Quad Core
    Socket: FM2
    Clockspeed: 3.9 GHz
    Turbo Speed: 4.2 GHz
    RAM – 16GB
    Motherboard – Gigabyte GA-F2A68HM-H
    Monitors – PreSonus Eris E4.5 4.5" Powered

    And that's about it. I have a EVGA Power supply, no special sound card.. no special fan/cooler since I don't overclock. I'll fill the details in later on.. When getting a CPU.. get at least a quad cord either AMD or Intel will do. For home recording don't go over-bored but for pro.. go overboard.


    For recording..
    Presonus Audiobox USB 96
    H&K Redbox
    Amp VOX AC15CC1


    Software.. When I got the Audiobox it came with Studio One V3 both the Artist and Prime keys. Use the Artist, it's the mid level tool for Studio One. In addition I just purchased a copy of Reaper. Both will do the job but with Reaper you can add third party plugins and to do that with Studio One you need the pro and that will cost 299 for the upgrade. I might do that later on but not now.

    That's it.. later.. :)
     
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  9. JonR

    JonR Senior Member

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    Great advice above, but I get my results more simply/cheaply, if it's of any interest.

    I have a Zoom G7.1ut multi-FX unit. That connects via USB to my PC (ancient Vista model currently, soon to be upgraded ). I use Audacity software to record and edit (and add effects such as reverb and compression), which is free. I.e., I record the BT into Audacity first, and then overdub my solo. Export as MP3 when done.
    No other interface, and I often have the Zoom on bypass. (I don't like a lot of effects.)

    I have recorded in the past just running the guitar (or an amp line-out) direct into the line-in on the PC - or an acoustic guitar via a mic and the mic in - adding any necessary effects on Audacity.

    My PC soundcard (if it makes any difference) is the Realtek that came with the PC.
     
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  10. spitfire

    spitfire Senior Member

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    I really like my Focusrite 18i something or other. Bigger version of what the OP proposed. They just seem to work. Never gives me trouble.

    That and Reaper like Pop1655 suggested is a great combination.

    Reaper is a digital audio workstation (DAW) software. Inexpensive (~$70) and fully functional. Within the DAW, you can load audio plugins (usually VST's). With these plugins you can completely simulate guitar amps, FX etc. There's a huge amount of plugins available. Many free ones, and of course lots you can buy.

    Get lots of RAM. I would agree that 8 GB is a minimum. RAM is cheap. Get more when you buy it. It can be complicated to upgrade down the road. Specs change etc.
    I have an 8 year old PC running an i7 quad core processor with 12 GB of RAM. It does well for my modest requirements. But a friend, who has the same machine, has produced full blown CDs with dozens of tracks on his with no issues.

    Solid state hard drives (SSD) are nice. Much faster than a conventional hard drive and absolutely silent. That's another point, some PC cooling fans can get noisy. While you don't need cutting edge gamer performance, the type of cooling a gamer PC uses doesn't hurt. Moving a lot of air slowly over a large heat sink keeps things quieter.

    Keep in mind that you pay a premium buying an off the shelf PC. If you are at all handy, you might want to investigate putting your own PC together. It's not that hard. Trickiest part is making sure the motherboard, CPU, and RAM all play well together. You can probably put together a PC that is much better than what you'd get from Dell for significantly less money. But like all things in life, choose your battles.
     
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  11. Stoli

    Stoli Senior Member

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    Lots of things to read up on and check out here. I have dabbled with Audacity a bit. Jeff-I have heard some of your recordings and you definitely get what sounds like excellent sound quality. I have mostly just recorded to see what I sounded like and never got so far as mixing tracks. Still doing a great deal of learning here on my side.
     
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  12. jeff_farkas

    jeff_farkas Senior Member

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    There is a lot to learn and it took me some time to finally figure out how to use Studio One properly, and I'm still learning.

    And thanks for the compliment.. I found that using my amp is the best way to get decent tone when recording and the redbox is well worth the 100 dollars. If you have any questions you can ask me.. glad to help out.

    Jeff
     
  13. JonR

    JonR Senior Member

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    Can you expand on that?
    When using the amp, do you mic it up, or use a line-out? How (when) do you use the redbox? I assume either - or both - go to the Presonus?
     
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  14. jeff_farkas

    jeff_farkas Senior Member

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    What I do is connect the amp porting of the Vox directly to the redbox and then use a mic cable to connect it to the Audiobox. The redbox has an 1/4 inch input to allow me to connect the amp and a mic out so I can connect that to the Audiobox.

    Images of redbox and link to Sweetwater..
    Link https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/RedBox5

    Images
    First one is the input to the redbox and the second one is the mic out...


    And this one is it hooked up
     
  15. jeff_farkas

    jeff_farkas Senior Member

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    I hope that clears things up a bit. In the last image you can see that the amp is going into the input of the redbox and then the mic cable is going to the input of the Audiobox or any other type that is similar to the Audiobox.
     
  16. jeff_farkas

    jeff_farkas Senior Member

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    Oh and to power the redbox you can use a battery, a power supply or the 48V that's on the Audiobox. I make use of the 48V.
     
  17. JonR

    JonR Senior Member

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    Excellent info, thanks!
     
  18. JonR

    JonR Senior Member

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    Excellent info, thanks!
     
  19. jeff_farkas

    jeff_farkas Senior Member

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    Glad I could help. It sounds like a lot but it's really not all that hard to set up. The big part is learning how to use the DAW no matter what it is.
     
  20. parts

    parts Senior Member

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    Pretty much the same here.. No soundcard other than the M Audio or Realtec..
    M Audio M Track about $90..a Pod and Audcacity.. OD then a little mix and compression maybe,,a little delay..all cheap stuff that's well better than stuff I used in the 70s at my studio..

    Sometimes my old Traynor and/or Gibson GA75 recording amp and two Shure SM and Nakamichi condenser..but room dynamics and family and 3 month old grandson have that quite limited..
     

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