Recording Headphone Out into Line In

Discussion in 'Recording Studio' started by fretman_2, Jan 3, 2017.

  1. fretman_2

    fretman_2 Senior Member

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    I got a nice new effects pedal for Christmas with headphone out, but no line out. I'd like to be able to record the pedal into my Tascam recording console, but the audio out of the pedal is quite low. What's involved in getting the two matched up so I'll have plenty of signal to use?

    Tnx,
     
  2. DarrellV

    DarrellV Almost 1 Year old this month! Premium Member

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    Assuming pedal is 1/4 guitar cable out.

    Assuming there is an XLR input on Tascam.

    I would use a DI box off your pedal out into the DI box and XLR into the TASCAM.

    Adjust gain at Tascam and Monitor off the Tascam.

    2 cents worth
     
  3. fretman_2

    fretman_2 Senior Member

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    Yes...1/4" out of the pedal. I will look at the DI boxes...thanks!

     
  4. Nicky

    Nicky On The Road Less Traveled Premium Member

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    That's the ticket.

    DI boxes are magical, and are used to connect a high-impedance, line level, unbalanced output signal to a low-impedance, microphone level, balanced input, usually via an XLR connector and cable, though you can also use balanced 1/4" cables in some DIs. DIs are frequently used to connect an electric bass (high impedance) or keyboard (line level) to a mixing console's microphone input jack. You can use a guitar if you don't want to mic your amp; there are special DIs made for guitar that will give you amp simulations. Transformers in the DI box do their mojo and perform level matching, balancing, and buffering or passive impedance matching/bridging to get rid of unwanted noise, hum and other interference caused by light fixtures, EMF or ground loops.

    A good DI with quality transformers is worth its weight in dilithium crystals!
     
  5. DarrellV

    DarrellV Almost 1 Year old this month! Premium Member

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    :thumb:

    Dang! The more time I spend here the more cool stuff I find out about peeps! :applause:
    Serves me right for not getting out more when I was younger..:D

    Dammit Nicky, are you a musician, or a doctor! LOL!!!:laugh2:
     
  6. Nicky

    Nicky On The Road Less Traveled Premium Member

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    I'm givin' her all I got, Cap'n!!!
     
  7. yeti

    yeti Senior Member

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    What kind of pedal is it? Headphone output? Anyway, regardless whether it has a headphone output (very low impedance but probably enough gain) or a regular buffered output (low impedance and low level) it doesn't need a DI box, it needs gain, probably 20 dB or so (less than a mic). Are you plugging into the line input via 1/4" or a mic input via the XLR connector? Try the line input first. If the gain on the line input isn't enough, adapt to plug the pedal into the mic preamp (tip to pin 2, sleeve to pin 1, unbalanced) and add gain. The DI won't hurt it but a cheap DI with ****ty transformer will color the sound. All you have to worry about is that your input (console line or mic input) has >10 times the impedance of the pedal output. if your pedal is buffered/ low impedance output, a DI is not needed. In "true bypass" all bets are off, off course.
    Anyway, the only thing a DI will get you with a buffered output is the ability to drive longer lines without noise interference because it's a balanced line vs the pedal straight into the console (unbalanced). But how long is it from the pedal to the mixer? probably not long enough to matter.

    http://www.soundonsound.com/sound-advice/q-do-i-need-use-di-box-guitar-pedal
     
  8. yeti

    yeti Senior Member

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    The levels a DI can take vary from one case to another. It's pretty standard to feed instrument level, including active PUs into a DI, many can take speaker levels. When feed true line level the cheap ones can saturate and color the sound due to bad transformers. Then there's frequency response. Forget a whirlwind Director on bass, it sounds terrible, the transformers do not let the low frequencies through. A Groove Tubes Brick or Avalon U5 (as well a a host of good solid state DI's) on the other hand will make Bass guitar sound unbelievably good straight into the console. There is a huge difference between DIs, passive and active. How critical is it on guitar? Use your ears but If you don't need a DI, don't use a DI. Just my opinion.
     
  9. DarrellV

    DarrellV Almost 1 Year old this month! Premium Member

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    :rofl::rofl:
     

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