PRS SC 58..has Paul gone too far?

Discussion in 'Other Guitars' started by shtdaprdtr, Oct 25, 2010.

  1. Actinic

    Actinic Senior Member

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    For those on the fence, trying to decide whether to buy a PRS SC58 or a Gibson R8/R9/R0, PRS has decided to offer prospective buyers a cheaper, no frills option. Known as the Stripped '58, it looks like a good contender at $2671:

    Stripped 58 : 91 : Guitars : Electric : Jims Guitars, Inc.

    Any MLP dealers carry this?
     
  2. tdarian

    tdarian Premium Member

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  3. b3john

    b3john Senior Member

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    They've been showing up on the Wildwood New Arrivals page literally by the dozen. Not a Historic Les Paul (R8/R9/R0) by any means, but probably a nice option for someone who doesn't need it to be.
     
  4. jerryratpack

    jerryratpack Member

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    I am taking this old thread I found and making a comment because I am dazed and confused about this whole thing... So today, I went into the guitar store with the intention of buying a Tom Anderson Bulldog . They had two: one with a thin neck and covered humbuckers and another with a 'C" type neck , Maple top with P90.

    I ended up coming out with a PRS SC58 , Great looking dark brown grain, from the PRS experience ( I am told ).

    Here is the thing, it does not play well with my modeler and monitors. I lower the gain, it sounds better, but looses the sustain, ... I lowered the Pups, made it a little better, but still had a scratchy type sound that I also got last year with a custom 24 I tried out.. The funny thing is, the PRS SE 245 sounds great that I bought a year ago thru the same rig.

    Now, onto another issue... I also have a Gibson Trad Pro... It has a smooth sustain that the SC 58 does not compete. Not ony is the PRS scratchy, ( ok, I know my modeler is set for that type of Pup output, so maybe it needs a good few days of tweaking.. ) BUT >>>>> My Gibson LP has much better Sustain...

    In the store, this sounded great in a cheap tube marshall , but only had it on Clean.. I think this is where it shines, at least for me.. and that is what sold me on it, however, I mainly play doing lead and going along with Backing tracks, so I need Mid to high gain lead sounds...

    again, I know this thing can deliver, but with my set up, it does not.. Going back to the store tomorrow and buying the Tom Anderson... If that does not work, I am buying a tube amp I can play at low volume.. maybe Line 6 DT 25 .. Then hopefully whatever type of guitar I buy should sound to its potential....
     
  5. Roger G Lewis

    Roger G Lewis Senior Member

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  6. Bobby Mahogany

    Bobby Mahogany Senior Member

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    Nice of you to revive a thread after 18 months! :shock:

    Nice room you're playing in.

    I've handled quite a few Les Paul's and PRS's while working in a store for years.
    Only once did I get a "tone feeling" when trying a PRS. I got a "tone feeling" many times trying Les Paul's and other Gibson models. I think that pretty much sums it.
    Cosmetically, quality control wise, PRS does a good job. I don't perceive their guitars as very musical though.
    A friend of mine (musician) got the "PRS buzz" and bought an expensive one. He eventually changed the nut, the saddles (tuning problems), the pickups twice, always trying to make it "it". "It" never happened. He put the original pickups back in and sold it to someone having the "PRS buzz". He could never get it to sound right. Maybe he was after a GIbson tone after all! Since then he's bought an SG '61RI, a Les Paul and a Flying V with no problems finding a good tone.

    I think that if people didn't read so much about PRS and just went to a music store to try guitars, PRS wouldn't be selling half the guitars they are selling.
    There, I said it!
    :D
     
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  7. jimmer_5

    jimmer_5 Senior Member

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    I just picked up a PRS SC58, so I feel like I can finally weigh in on this issue. I am surprised how many people see this as a "buy one or the other" kind of issue". I personally wanted both.

    I have always been a Gibson guy at heart. After years of playing cheaper substitutes, I finally have both a R6 and an R8. I love them both, and they're both keepers. Then about a year ago, I found a good deal on a PRS Custom 22. I played it against a bunch of other guitars, and it just appended to be the one that sounded the best. It's a monster guitar - it is a unique instrument, not really a Gibson or a Fender. When the SC58 came out, I was intrigued. I played one, and I was hooked. They are phenomenal sounding guitars, and I would recommend anyone try one out.

    It's not really a Les Paul - it is more similar sounding than any other PRS I have played, but it is still not exactly like a Paul. It has a rich, round, smooth tone. The 57/08 pickups sound fantastic. The woods are top notch and the build quality is fantastic.

    I understand that people consider the SC58 to be a Les Paul copy, but I respectfully disagree. I think Paul Reed Smith took a Les Paul and made it his own. It has much of what makes a Les Paul great - the thick mahogany body, carved maple top, shorter scale, smooth low output humbuckers. It also has beautiful re-interpretations of the tune-o-matic bridge and stop tailpiece, wonderful locking tuners, a comfortable neck carve, and great proprietary pickups. PRS can't make a single cutaway design because Gibson did it first? I don't see the logic in that. There are lots of guitars that are based on similar shapes. The PRS singlecut design is not a direct tracing of the Les Paul profile, and I think it stands on it's own.

    I played five or six singlecut PRS guitars before I bought this one. There was only one of them that left me cold. They are extremely consistent guitars and the quality is evident when you handle and play them. You may or may not agree with my assessment, but these instruments are fantastic. So are my custom shop Gibsons. I love them both, and I see no reason for hate towards one or the other.
     
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  8. JSH1970

    JSH1970 Senior Member

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    "It's not really a Les Paul - it is more similar sounding than any other PRS I have played, but it is still not exactly like a Paul. It has a rich, round, smooth tone. The 57/08 pickups sound fantastic. The woods are top notch and the build quality is fantastic." jimmer




    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^:dude:



    I sold mine........But same thing could be said about mine. I thought about wiring it more vintage specs and/or a pickup change. But got a good offer and let it go.
    [​IMG]
     
  9. jordans0nly

    jordans0nly Senior Member

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    Those are just beautiful guitars.
     
  10. jimmer_5

    jimmer_5 Senior Member

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    I need to get some better pics of mine - these are the seller's pics:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  11. The Archer

    The Archer Senior Member

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    His new pickup ideas and mods to things like finishes, fret wire, hardware and their new approaches to drying wood show that PRS is absolutely not out of ideas. PRS is a very progressive company.
     
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  12. The Wedge

    The Wedge Banned

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  13. jimmer_5

    jimmer_5 Senior Member

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    I was just thinking this afternoon - why is it that PRS gets attacked for building a guitar with similar features to a Les Paul? The PRS SC58 has similar features, but the body shape, carve, headstock, bridge, etc are all different to varying degrees. Have you guys seen a Hamer Standard or Vector? They were direct copies of the Explorer and Flying V, but everyone seems to be fine with that.

    Manufacturer's make things because they see a market for it. Based on the fact that ther a re multiple forums for just Les Pauls, it's obvious that there is a healthy market for vintage sounding single cutaway guitars. PRS made one, and it's a nice instrument - if you like Les Pauls you should like this guitar. Gibson makes a great one too. Competition is not a bad thing, particularly when both companies are making a great product. And you and I, the consumer, are the winners. We get more good options to choose from. The SC58 is inspired by the Les Paul, there's no denying it. However, a guitar inspired by a Les Paul and a direct copy of a Les Paul are two different things.
     
  14. b3john

    b3john Senior Member

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    Why is it that the PRS faithful periodically feel the need to dredge up old threads to defend Paul?

    For every comment Paul has ever made about his "improvements" to the Les Paul, that SC58 model was pretty much a one-eighty.
     
  15. BluesDisciple

    BluesDisciple Senior Member

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    Because he can. That's why.
     
  16. jimmer_5

    jimmer_5 Senior Member

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    And why is it that people like you are so opposed to discussion on a discussion forum? I "dredged this up" because I finally found a good deal on an SC58 and I was excited to share. This thread is situated in a subforum that is completely devoted to "other guitars", so I see nothing inappropriate in trumpeting the virtues of a nice instrument.

    I am simply expressing the opinion that I don't believe this design is deserving of the anger it inspired in Gibson fans. I am a Gibson fan first and foremost - I still own more Gibson guitars than PRS. That doesn't stop me from appreciating other guitars. I don't see this guitar as a blatant copy, but as a piece inspired by the Les Paul. It's just my opinion.
     
  17. b3john

    b3john Senior Member

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    To be fair, my original objection was that this was in the Gibson Les Paul forum. Between then and now, a mod moved it to "Other Guitars", which is completely fine by me.

    Mea culpa.
     
  18. jimmer_5

    jimmer_5 Senior Member

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    Ah, that makes sense. My apologies if I came off harsh - Being late to the party, I was unaware that this thread originated somewhere else.

    - Jim
     
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  19. Breakrite

    Breakrite Premium Member

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    Interesting read from the beginning when the SC58 was first coming out, until current where it seems to be gone from the PRS line up. I guess the SC245 replaced it?

    I bought one in 2011 and have to say it's a favorite player. Didn't take too long to get used to it. It's well under 8 pounds as well, so that helps.

    I have a newer LP Custom and also the 83 Spotlight in the picture for side by side. They all play different. Someday I'll make a side by side audio of all three to compare.
     

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  20. FennRx

    FennRx Senior Member

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    i know that youtube is only youtube, but the videos i've seen comparing the Stripped 58s to Gibson Historics always have the Gibson as the clear winner.

    For a guitar that is a non-Gibson Les Paul, does it even sound like one? Is it a pickup issue?
     

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