PRS is killing it

Discussion in 'Other Guitars' started by Steinmetzify, Dec 4, 2012.

  1. Tag101

    Tag101 Senior Member

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    :p

    (Thanks Smorg)
     
  2. upl8tr

    upl8tr Senior Member

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  3. Tag101

    Tag101 Senior Member

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    57/08s. Great pickups! :)
     
  4. upl8tr

    upl8tr Senior Member

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    Yer, I have those in my CU24 too, I like them a lot.
     
  5. gibsonguitar1988

    gibsonguitar1988 Senior Member

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    The 57/08s are killer. I'd put em in my LP if I could buy them ala carte for a great price from PRS. Great PAF type.
     
  6. Dolebludger

    Dolebludger Premium Member

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    Tag101:

    Great playing and great guitars! Great jazz. I'm trying to get into jazz myself, and let me tell you, it ain't easy. You can just forget about all the "standard" chord progressions. And I find my PRS well adapted to jazz. The single tone control does a good job of dialing off some of the treble (as I like to do for jazz) without killing it.
     
  7. cmjohnson

    cmjohnson Senior Member

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    90 percent of jazz is a II-V (fixed a typo!) progression over a root. If the root is VI, then you have a starting point you're familiar with, a transposed form of the I-IV-V you're probably heard of.

    Once you get into harmonic analysis of jazz standards, you'll start seeing this pattern all over the place. II-V of (something). It's everywhere. It's as common outside of rock and blues as I-IV-V is inside of rock and blues.

    Between that, and this simple rule: Dominant 7ths resolve up a fourth or down a half step, with one of those two falling into the scale and the other does not, and the one that is in the scale is the proper tone to resove on....this is a huge chunk of jazz theory laid out in just a couple of sentences.

    The theory of jazz is not so difficult. Now, actually playing it well, that's another story entirely.


    CJ
     
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