PRS Custom 22 finish repair?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by The_Nuge, Nov 22, 2013.

  1. The_Nuge

    The_Nuge Senior Member

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    Hi!
    My 2003 PRS Custom 22 has this chip in the finish on the heel of the neck. Can this be easily repaired? Preferably DIY - I don't have a spray gun or the like :). Failing that, a competent luthier / repair-person in the Stuttgart area og Germany would also do the trick!


    Ooops... forgot the pic:

    [​IMG]
    Cheers

    Es
     
  2. Ganorin

    Ganorin Senior Member

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    first you have to check wether its a 2K (most likely) or a Nitro finish. You can do so by using a small amount of alkohol under the tuners and see if it resolves it (Nitro). for 2K you could use superglue, for Nitro Nitro-lacquer...
    I'm near Munich, I could give you a hand if you like too...there is a German building community...drop me a message and we may find somebody in your area...
    cheers
    Alex
     
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  3. The_Nuge

    The_Nuge Senior Member

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    I'm fairly sure it isn't nitro...

    How would you go about filling chip with superglue?

    Es
     
  4. Freddy G

    Freddy G V.I.P. Member

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    Not nitro.

    CA glue drop-fill repair.
     
  5. BPW666

    BPW666 Senior Member

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    Drop fill =
    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rTVScFJoe24]Fixing a small chip in a guitar finish - YouTube[/ame]
    I leave it more experienced types to tell you how to do it on a corner.
     
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  6. Freddy G

    Freddy G V.I.P. Member

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    The corner is actually the easiest to drop fill....easier than on a flat plane because you can overfill the chip, then shape the CA with a small file without touching the surrounding finish. Then fine sand and buff....easy peasy!
     
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  7. The_Nuge

    The_Nuge Senior Member

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    Seeing that you are the Albert Einstein of guitar repairs, everything is easy peasy for you :D

    Oh well, it's only a PRS, so I might as well give it a go... Will any old Loctite do? What should I clean the area with before filling?

    Cheers

    Es
     
  8. Freddy G

    Freddy G V.I.P. Member

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    Ha!

    You should start with the thinnest viscosity CA....as thin as water. Carefully put a drop in the chip. Use gravity to your advantage. That means hold the guitar in such a way as to make sure the CA goes where it's supposed to and not run down the neck. You may have to turn and tilt the guitar to make sure of that.
    The reason you start out with the thin CA is that it will wick into any crevice or crack it can find. You want it to wick under the edge of the chip where it's a lighter colour. The light coloured area is where the finish has separated from the wood. When the CA gets in there the colour will go back to original. Once everything is well sealed and the thin CA has wicked into every crevice and underneath the finish edge you can switch to thicker CA to build up. The thicker stuff is much easier to manage because it won't run or dribble out of control like the thin stuff will if you let it.

    You don't need to clean anything before hand.

    Good Luck!
     
  9. Tugboat

    Tugboat Senior Member

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    CA = cyanoacrilyde (if I spelled that correctly). Regular 'ol superglue.
     
  10. BBLong

    BBLong Senior Member

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    CA is the snobby, hip way to say superglue. It's kinda like ordering coffee from Starbuck's. You either order like I do and get the eye roll, or you sound all cool and hip and part of the "in" crowd.

    This is all tongue-in-cheek, of course. Some people don't realize that CA (cyanoacrylate) is Superglue, Krazy glue, Loctite, and other brand names. The -ate at the end of the name in chemistry denotes the negative ion of an acid. How it applies here I am not sure as I have not looked up the chemical formula of the substance. If it were cyanoacralyde, as previously mentioned, it would most likely have an aldehyde bond, which is just a different type of arrangement of the carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen atoms in the bond.

    If you do use it, the best way is to put a thin layer, let it sit for a while, then add another thin layer, and repeat, until it forms a slight "mound" of glue above the finish. The next step is to scrape it down, as shown in the video posted above. Follow that routine and it will come out beautifully and you should never know it happened unless someone blacklight's the thing. Very few PRSi are finished in nitro. You can do the test with nail polish remover on an inconspicuous spot. I don't like taking off tuners if I dont' have to, so you can remove the one of the back cavity covers for either the trem or the control cavity and touch the nail polish (acetone) to a spot or two with a Q-tip. If it dissolves, it's nitro (most likely not unless you have an Eagle of some sort, or some really high-end model or private stock that was ordered with it, which from the pic it looks like an off-the-shelf PRS, which is better than many off-the-shelf guitars, by the way).

    Watch that Dan Erlewine video 4 or 5 times, buy the supplies, then watch it 4-5 times again, then try it. Some might say the supplies will cost enough to just pay to have it fixed. If you are like any of us here, you will ding it again or own multiple guitars, so the supplies will pay for themselves over time. I purposely look for beat up guitars cuz I can fix 'em for very little.

    Bob
     
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