Process for thinning nitro finish?

Discussion in 'The Custom Shop' started by Riffster, Jan 27, 2017.

  1. Riffster

    Riffster Senior Member

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    Has anybody sanded down the thickness of the nitro finish on a Gibson, then re-polished and buff?

    I am not talking about stripping a guitar but simply wet sanding to thin the finish.

    What would be the starting point for sanding paper grade?
     
  2. Freddy G

    Freddy G V.I.P. Member

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    I've wet sanded just to remove light scratches...then buffed. But specifically to thin the finish? That's a dangerous road to go down. The likelihood of burning through a color coat is very high. You won't know it's happened until after you've burned through.

    But to answer your question, if you want to do it I'd start with maybe 1000 grit, then go to 1500 and buff.
     
  3. Riffster

    Riffster Senior Member

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    OK, thanks. I do have a bit of experience since I refinished a Flying V in nitro last year.

    I am going to start on the back of my Les Paul since it is flat and easier to sand evenly. I don't want to do anything extreme is just that the finish looks thick, especially on the back.
     
  4. Riffster

    Riffster Senior Member

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    Well, I have no pics but I did it and it worked well, I achieved what I wanted.

    I only sanded the back of my 58 reissue, just to remove the excess, the clear coat looked very thick and actually there were lines where the nitro kept sinking into the mahogany, it was especially thick close to the neck joint, it was evident when looking at the edges of the guitar on the back.

    I guess while spraying the neck joint and cutaway the thickness simply got to be too much. That spot required a lot more sanding than the rest of the back.

    Started with 1000 grit, then 2000 then 5000 and polished.

    The clear coat now looks normal and flat since the lines of nitro sipping into the wood disappeared. I do not have a buffer other than a drill attachment but that worked perfect because my guitar is VOS.

    I am really happy with the result, the back looks now normal to me.

    I will not move on to the rest of the guitar, the clear coat is pretty normal everywhere else.
     

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