Playing for 12+ years.. I still suck.

Discussion in 'Guitar Lessons' started by Destroythevoice, Dec 2, 2017.

  1. Destroythevoice

    Destroythevoice Senior Member

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    Hey guys. So I'm trying to open up a little bit.. I admire my guitars so much..i love playing the little i know on them. I feel terrible though when I let someone else play my guitar and they can go insane ALL over my fretboard... I do NOT know my way around my fretboard.. I cant shred.. I cant solo.. Ive written all my songs based off what I felt sound good.. Always have been a rhythm player.

    Hoping someone can lead me in the right direction or perhaps a website that has lessons i can use with guitar pro or videos? I REALLY want to expand my knowledge and become a better guitarist for myself because I hate that I cant express my proper emotion via my guitars.

    Any help will be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. NewDayHappy

    NewDayHappy Senior Member

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    If I were you, I'd start in either key of G, A, C or D, those 4 keys account for probably half the songs you hear on Spotify.

    The minor pentatonic is the best key to learn for rock and blues. Learn all 5 positions up and down the neck, within a month you'll be writing riffs and gliding up and down the neck. A minor is the funnest scale to learn, it goes good with progressions in key of C. Typically you use the relative minor which is the 6th degree in the major scale. In key of C, you'd want to play A minor pentatonic, in key of G you'd want to play E minor pentatonic and so on. I'd start there for lead guitar.

    For rhythm guitar you need to learn the notes in each key, you figure this out by playing the major scale. The 1st note is major, the 2nd note is minor, the 3rd note is minor, 4th note is major, 5th note is major, 6th note is minor (also known as the relative minor), 7th note is diminished.

    Key of C would look like this:
    1 - C major (known as the tonic)
    2 - D minor
    3 - E minor (Known as the mood chord)
    4 - F major (This chord wants you to resolve to either the tonic or the relative minor.)
    5 - G major (Just like the 4th, pushes you to either the tonic or relative minor.)
    6 - A minor ( Also known as the relative minor, this chord can substitute for the tonic. It also sounds fantastic when combined with the tonic, makes great choruses. In this instance it would be C major and A minor together, I use this all the time.)
    7 - B diminished (I wouldn't worry about this note/degree yet.)

    Remember if you start in key of C, I highly recommend you give A minor pentatonic a try with it. I hope this helps you. Good luck.
     
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  3. rockstar232007

    rockstar232007 Senior Member

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    Don't worry, I've been playing for almost 30, and I'm still nowhere as good as I should be.
     
  4. frankv

    frankv What Are You Waiting For? Double Platinum Supporter Premium Member V.I.P. Member

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    What style do you play in. When I know that I can recommend some courses that has helped me.
     
  5. Thumpalumpacus

    Thumpalumpacus Senior Member

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    Does @Malikon still give Skype lessons?
     
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  6. Malikon

    Malikon ゴジラの復活 V.I.P. Member

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    eeyup he do. :D I have a few MLP students atm.
     
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  7. Neofelis Nebulosa

    Neofelis Nebulosa Senior Member

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    Any thoughts on Rocksmith?
     
  8. Destroythevoice

    Destroythevoice Senior Member

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    I am a metal player.. Love the hell out of my drop tunings and enjoy my 7 string. But looking to learn bluesy and classical styles of playing to perfect my playing
     
  9. saks

    saks Double Platinum Supporter Premium Member

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    If you don't find a personal instructor I would recommend JamPlay. Every lesson I did there had GP files with them. 30 Day money back guarentee and $5 for first month right now.
    https://enroll.jamplay.com/signup#select
     
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  10. Thumpalumpacus

    Thumpalumpacus Senior Member

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    PM the guy already, you know your shit and he wants a way out.
     
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  11. Malikon

    Malikon ゴジラの復活 V.I.P. Member

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    nah I don't really promote myself or push myself onto people like that, if he wants lessons he can write me. There's room for a few more students.

    Most students come to me by word of mouth I've never had to aggressively try to recruit or anything. :)
     
  12. DotStudio

    DotStudio Silver Supporter

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    I'll offer my recommendation of hitting up Mal for lessons. I haven't personally taken lessons from him, but I know chops when i hear them.
     
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  13. Thumpalumpacus

    Thumpalumpacus Senior Member

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    Yeah, j/k about the PM. I've never taught, but it seems to me that students who hunt you down are probably more motivated anyway.
     
  14. spitfire

    spitfire Senior Member

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    First some perspective. We all naturally compare ourselves to recordings and performances we hear. But remember these are people who do this for a living. It is their day job.

    Many of these people put more hours into playing and practicing by the time they graduate high school, than you will do in your life.

    So while it is great to aspire to play like a pro, it's not realistic for most of us. It really is about enjoying the journey of getting better than it is about reaching a specific goal. Even the best of the best musicians continue to get better.

    Concerning getting better, I highly recommend TrueFire online courses. They have a huge amount of video lessons with tabs and backing tracks. They have lessons and many genres such as rock, blues, jazz, and so on.

    You can buy individual lessons packages for $20-$30. Or as I do now, buy an annual subscription to everything. I buy the subscription on sale for $99/year. It goes on sale for any excuse of a holiday. Might still be on sale now for the post-week after Thanksgiving sale or whatever.

    TrueFire also has something they call "Learning Paths". This may only be available with the subscription. What I like is it is a sort of "start here" and progress thing for a type of playing. I think it is helpful for someone wanting more guidance. But they have lessons on very specific things like blues endings, or learning the fingerboard.

    They have many different instructors. Some courses put on by well known players. Though, many great courses by people you never heard of. And similar material is taught by different instructors. So you can find the one with the teaching style you like best. And for extra, you can actually get personal lessons from some of the instructors. Though I've never done that.

    There are many other online sources, but TrueFire is certainly one of the highest quality with broadest range you'll find.

    https://truefire.com/
     
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  15. jcsk8

    jcsk8 Senior Member

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    Only playing wouldn´t improve much of your playing habilities. You should practice guitar. Playing a song isn´t the best way to study guitar.
    You can do it tho ways: Learning songs from different styles to improve your solo, or study scales, theory and practicing licks.
    There are many youtube channels with free and great lessons.
    I suggest that you first learn and master the pentatonic, then go for another scales. Many players can play the penta but do not master it. It´s a powerfull tool that can cover any style with great results.
     
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  16. BBD

    BBD Senior Member

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    Lots of stuff is in A minor pentatonic (the 'blues / rock' scale). Start with that.

    5 positions:

    [​IMG]

    1 scale:

    [​IMG]

    Start with position 1. Download a blues jam track in Am and noodle along to it for as many hours as it takes. Stick to the higher notes. Then try position 4 against the same backing. Then 3. It'll come, if you keep playing and listening. And keep just practising the scale - go up and come back down. Do it five times, then fire up the backing track and play along again. Your ears will begin to hear how it fits together without you really thinking about it.
     
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  17. Thumpalumpacus

    Thumpalumpacus Senior Member

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    I learnt major and minor scales first, and then pentatonics. I also learnt how to harmonize scales. Those early experiences were perhaps a little more difficult than simply learning a pentatonic and going to town, but I feel they gave me a greater understanding of what was going on.
     
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  18. artis_xe

    artis_xe Christopher Premium Member

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    short little background

    when I was younger , I broke both of my hands ( catching myself when jumping out of a tree ) . I was told that I would never have the full use of my fingers again . at the time , I had a friend whose father was an acupuncturist . I re-gained the mobility of my fingers in just a few short months ___ but I still chose to play the drums . easier on my fingers

    shoot to age 47 . suffered a major heart attack . while recovering , all that I could think about in my hospital bed , was " Why did I never learn to play guitar ? " . my hands of course . I had been able to use them for keyboards ( yes . I'm an instrument jumper ) . but guitar was very different . much more coordination was needed

    so I started doing hand exercises / stretches . slowly , I started to get my fingers in shape , to be able to form chords , and play lead passages . never really thought about it after that . just kept playing

    ___________________________________________________________

    now . recently my wife has started picking up the acoustic that I keep next to the couch . she told me that it seems like I have so much fun when I play . she wanted to feel the same thing . but her fear was the same as anyone else's . how am I going to do these things with my fingers

    that's when it struck me . a person's hands cannot do some of these things unless the fingers are properly stretched / warmed up . and there are probably many players that feel that isometric hand exercises are useless . as in " the best practice for your hands , is to just play . . . " . there is no way that can be true . martial artists train in repetitive motions , while paying attention to properly stretched muscles . so do athletes

    conclusion of this post is : my wife picked up the guitar in October . before that she was almost afraid to hold one . after doing hand stretches on a daily basis , she has gained a tremendous amount of confidence , in being able to play . and she knows Driving on 9 , by The Breeders , and Fade Into You , by Mazzy Star . well enough , that she could easily play them in front of an audience

    mind you . I've heard each song at least 100 times . I'm trying to get her to add another song :laugh2: . but I have to say . another thing that counts is perseverance . she sounded HORRIBLE when she first started . but my bleeding ears didn't stop her
     
  19. Malikon

    Malikon ゴジラの復活 V.I.P. Member

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    a lot of people have a fear of other people hearing them practice and sound bad,..and I know it's crazy but that fear keeps them from practicing and (sort of) keeps them sounding bad, because they're just not practicing enough.

    you have to convince yourself you don't care how bad it sounds or who hears it you're just going to work through it.


    ....that being said you don't have to practice through a half stack. Big amps are for gigs. You can practice unplugged just fine.
     
  20. Dick Banks

    Dick Banks Senior Member

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    Get a gig, any gig, even if it's just playing with some other guys in a garage twice a month. Church gigs are great--they play some good music, are always looking for musicians, and are generally tolerant of your skill level. You will be pushed this way--"hey, I gotta know how to play this by Thursday."
    And a definitely +1 on the TruFire lessons.
     
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