Pentatonic scale tricks

Discussion in 'Guitar Lessons' started by rudarb, May 11, 2009.

  1. hippie

    hippie Junior Member

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    wow man this is just what iv been looking for lol thank you very much. this place rocks
     
  2. Xavier_32

    Xavier_32 Senior Member

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    Wow. So much talk about the Pentatonic boxes! :shock: Sometimes I forget what it's like to be stuck in the boxes. Blending the shapes opens up so many phrasing options. So does using outside notes to move from major to minor when the mood calls for it.

    Try this little run in the E pentatonic, it's an easy way up the neck, and sort of gets you out of boxes. Reverse it to go down the neck.

    -----------------------------------10-12--
    --------------------------8-10-12---------
    ---------------------7-9------------------
    --------------5-7-9-----------------------
    ---------5-7------------------------------
    0-3-5-7-----------------------------------
     
  3. djlogan33

    djlogan33 Senior Member

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  4. John Vasco

    John Vasco I'm with the band V.I.P. Member

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    I've read through this thread and am totally feckin' confused...
     
  5. djlogan33

    djlogan33 Senior Member

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    What are you confused about?


    A pentatonic scale is a musical scale with five pitches per octave in contrast to a heptatonic (seven note) scale such as the major scale.
    Pentatonic scales are very common and are found all over the world, including Celtic folk music, Hungarian folk music, West African music, African-American spirituals, Jazz, American blues music and rock music
     
  6. John Vasco

    John Vasco I'm with the band V.I.P. Member

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    Well that chart you posted in post # 43, for example. Can't follow that at all.
     
  7. Drudeboy

    Drudeboy V.I.P. Member

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    it's the seating layout to book flights on the A300 you thick scouse twat...
     
  8. SludgeBurns

    SludgeBurns Senior Member

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    Fretboard Logic is where I learned about the CAGED system and I have a much better understanding of pentatonic positions now. I highly recommend it.
     
  9. John Vasco

    John Vasco I'm with the band V.I.P. Member

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    What's 'Fretboard Logic' you mention in your post, and the 'caged' system? Things are not getting any clearer.
     
  10. Drudeboy

    Drudeboy V.I.P. Member

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    I believe the 'caged' system is where they lock you up in a cage until you play it right..:thumb:
     
  11. John Vasco

    John Vasco I'm with the band V.I.P. Member

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    So... that's when the logic of the fretboard comes into play. Does it? This caged system thing is logical all over the fretboard? Is that what you're saying?
     
  12. Drudeboy

    Drudeboy V.I.P. Member

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    Quite clearly, no.
     
  13. John Vasco

    John Vasco I'm with the band V.I.P. Member

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    So what's the link between the logic of the fretboard and the system of playing in a 'caged' way, then? I think you know the answer, but aren't willing to tell me.
     
  14. Drudeboy

    Drudeboy V.I.P. Member

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    Quite clearly, that maybe partly true..
     
  15. djlogan33

    djlogan33 Senior Member

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    =========================================================
    The picture below is all 5-boxes of the A-minor Pentatonic scale.
    Each box is shown on a different guitar neck.
    When they are viewed on one guitar neck they are confusing because they all overlap and repeat.
    When I first learned these scales, I would play a real slow A-minor Blues backtrack and play each note in the 1st box, over and over again, mixing up the notes within the box. Once I got pretty good on the first box, I did the same with the 3rd box, then the 5th box. Then I would play bits and pieces of all the boxes emphazing the root-note. Then I would play the 1st box up on the 17th fret. When you break it down in boxes, it becomes easy.

    [​IMG]
     
  16. Mookakian

    Mookakian Senior Member

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    Amen, i hate you, but amen :)
     
  17. L60N

    L60N Senior Member

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    The reason Amajor pent sounds shite when you "slide down three frets" is because you've just gone into Gm pent, not Amaj ;)

    Spend some time on the major scale. Learn where the the minor scale derives fro
    the major scale. Forget "sliding down three frets", it's bollocks.

    This is where you'll figure out where the blues breaks all the rules.

    There's some really great advice in here btw. Chord shape visualisation, I personally always strive for that, then build up around it.
     
  18. djlogan33

    djlogan33 Senior Member

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    ========================================================
    I agree with the above too.
    I've seen guys @ my Blues Jams play a complete 12-bar Blues lead in ONE pentatonic box. It sounds OK, but there is little creativity. As written above, you learn the scales/boxes so you know what pieces of them you can use when you are improvising a lead riff. It's also nice blend in some chords while doing a lead riff.

    This is why I continue to play as often as I can to create new and better tones and more unique, creative improvising riffs.

    The 1st video is an example of all that I just mentioned is shown in this video of Ronnie Earl.
    He would have sounded better if he was playing a Les Paul...ha...ha...

    The 2nd video is Gregor Hilden playing a nice blues track using different pieces of A-minor pentatonic boxes and chords...on a Les Paul.
    Enjoy...:dude:

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_wLIOhnZkIM]YouTube - Ronnie Earl - Blues Guitar with Soul DVD[/ame]

    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=44QsujsuQOI[/ame]
     
  19. Weaver

    Weaver Senior Member

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    thanks very helpful
     
  20. jerryo

    jerryo Senior Member

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    There is some kind of deal where you simply slide the box up or down 3 frets and it becomes a major...or is it a minor :hmm:
     

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