Old Wood Question

Discussion in 'Historics & Reissues' started by JimmyAce2006, Feb 13, 2017.

  1. BBD

    BBD Senior Member

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    @Mouse

    >>Anyone who told you that logic or philosophical methods are truth is moron.

    Nobody did, nor do I argue this. A whopping strawman, and not your first on this thread.

    @ jamman

    >>Funny thing about all this back and forth between you 2 guys is ,,, the only thing I've gotten from all of it ... Is
    A Headache ......:laugh2:

    Me too. If you read Mouse closely, you will notice one thing is consistent: he is very careful never to respond substantively to anything that I say. He's also rather fond of misdirection.
     
  2. BBD

    BBD Senior Member

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    >>myth/arts=truth // Science, philosophy, logic=speculation

    Das is nicht einmal falsch, as someone cleverer that both of us once said.
     
  3. Bobby Mahogany

    Bobby Mahogany Senior Member

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    Wow!
    I come back like a week later and you guys are still at it!

    I don't know what to say.
    Oh yeah!
    Wood matters!
    So there you go!
    :D
     
  4. BBD

    BBD Senior Member

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    Really, it's a worldview thing :laugh2:

    Mouse is a Romantic; me not so much :)
     
  5. mrfett

    mrfett HJ Lover Premium Member

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    /thread
     
  6. RAG7890

    RAG7890 Premium Member

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  7. Mouse

    Mouse Senior Member

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    Haha Rudi, where is the like button :thumb:
     
  8. Mouse

    Mouse Senior Member

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    yes it does.
    if you have acoustic guitar you can watch this over seasons, measure top width and length. it will move aprox. 2mm over seasons. wood is never completely dead cause it's hygroscopic material. it means it will take and release moisture. in electrics solid body this is also evident in lacquer cracks, something must shrink and expand for lacquer to crack. it means wood is taking and releasing moisture and therefore ''breathe'' in the certain way.
     
  9. wizard1183

    wizard1183 Premium Member

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    So is that the reason why a guitar sounds like **** one day and great the next? :laugh2:
     
  10. jlb32

    jlb32 Senior Member

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    Wood is what it is. Some of it comes together and sounds great as a guitar and some of it does not. Vintage or new it's still all the same IMO. There are vintage dogs and new dogs.

    To me there is no magic in super old wood. A fully grown tree is a fully grown tree whether it be 50 years old or 500 years old.

    Most manufacturers dry their wood to dryness specs regardless of the age. Even old growth wood needs to be dried out, same and less old wood.
     
  11. Sct13

    Sct13 Gold Supporter Premium Member

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    Right .....wood doesn't "breath" as you and I do.

    It will soak up moisture and let moisture go as the ambient humidity changes. The finish on wood is supposed to prevent this, but overtime and the areas that are not finished will allow this "respiration" (which isn't the true meaning of respiration)
     
  12. wizard1183

    wizard1183 Premium Member

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    Hey you're ruining the mystique behind old growth. You need to go!:laugh2::laugh2::laugh2:
     
  13. BBD

    BBD Senior Member

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    Ah come on. Pedantry is my gig :laugh2:

    Wood 'breathes' in the sense of expanding / shrinking / expanding / shrinking. Cellular comms engineers talk about 'cell breathing' as coverage area expands and contracts as in-cell traffic varies... It's fair enough and besides, Mouse is essentially correct: seasonal variation in humidity drives the cyclic expansion / contraction (which creates the craquelure in hard nitro finishes).
     
  14. RAG7890

    RAG7890 Premium Member

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    ..................I'm just felled by the discussion in this Thread. :D :wave:

    :cheers2:
     
  15. rlefty

    rlefty Premium Member

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    Can we argue now about the fact that guitarists at some pointed started using the word "tone", which already had a different musical definition, to mean "timbre", and that now, if you say "tone" in a musical context, it's ambiguous?

    Someone I'm sure has strong opinions on this, and someone else is just waiting to call that person names for them.
     
  16. KBMelb

    KBMelb Senior Member

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    If the finish can bleed it can breathe...

    I think that's how the saying goes...maybe not. IDK.
     
  17. Mouse

    Mouse Senior Member

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    Haha :thumb:


    [​IMG]
     
  18. wizard1183

    wizard1183 Premium Member

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    That guitars unplayable. It's missing a neck :laugh2: the headless gibson!
     
  19. BBD

    BBD Senior Member

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    Removing the neck reduces energy loss from the strings by forced vibration because there aren't any strings. It's a stroke of design genius.

    (Mouse, this is *not* a dig at you or your impressive skillz. It's just a stupid joke).
     
  20. Mouse

    Mouse Senior Member

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    It's pixidust's guitar, it may be headless but in the end will be brainless :D

    [​IMG]

    Cuban mahogany oldgrowth and old :) it should weight at the end below 4kg
    [​IMG]

    Nice/open cells even after sanding. look how acetate binding/acetone merge with cells, should be interesting closeup we never see
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Historically, perhaps the most celebrated and revered cabinet and furniture wood in the world. Cuban Mahogany has been used extensively in cabinetry and furniture-making for centuries in Europe and the United States, being harvested to the point of complete depletion. Nearly 100 years ago, H.O. Neville wrote of the wood’s exploitation in his 1919 work, Hardwoods of Cuba:

    For domestic purposes, the Mahogany is used in such freedom that it seems sacrilege to the newcomer from the North, who has known this wood only in its finished and very expensive forms. Many hundreds of cords of this timber, ranging from 12 inches in diameter down, are annually burned under the boilers of our sugar mills and locomotives: hundreds of trees of the proper sizes are annually cut down and rough-hewed into railroad ties; and for posts, corralled fences, and the myriad other uses of the plantation, Mahogany is utilized. There will come a day not very far distant when the waste of this valuable timber will be regretted.

    In 1946, Cuba banned all exporting of the wood due to over-harvesting and high demand; it has also been in scarce supply from other sources in the Caribbean as well. Today, the lumber has become so obscure that the term “Genuine Mahogany” now applies almost exclusively to its close substitute, Honduran Mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla), rather than the Cuban wood that for centuries has simply been referred to as “Mahogany.”

    Cuban Mahogany’s easy workability, combined with its beauty and phenomenal stability have made this lumber an enduring favorite.
     

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