NGD: ...So it looks like I joined a small, exclusive club (Early Edwards E-LP)

Discussion in 'Other Single-Cuts' started by LTigh, Jul 15, 2017.

  1. LTigh

    LTigh Junior Member

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    So I normally don't do NGDs, instead posting in the General threads, but thought I'd post this because reasons.

    Work schedule and Photobucket fail had pretty much kept me from creating the post when I first got this, but slight respite from Day Job (not long, still gotta head back and work over the weekend) and moving what little I could over to imugr (lel download timeouts) meant I had time to fix up some things and get her presentable.

    So pics, first, then stats, followed by rambling.

    Looks like a typical E-LP from Edwards...
    [​IMG]

    But... wait. Plain-top?
    [​IMG]

    Nibs??
    [​IMG]

    Two-screw TRC???
    [​IMG]

    Replaced guts is replaced.
    [​IMG]

    CTS pots and orange drops.
    [​IMG]

    Switchcraft.
    [​IMG]

    Old-school Navigator-style cream back covers.
    [​IMG]

    Right, so this one popped up on my favorite GAS-inducing and GAS-resolving site, Yahoo Auctions Japan via Buyee.

    Old-school iteration of the Edwards E-LP, rumored to be burn-off of old Navigator kit parts. Lemon drop plain top, two screw TRC, fret end binding, MOP inlays, stock ESP pups. 1989 model, if serial number convention for ESPs of this era is any indication, but since it's ESP, it could be meaningless, but seems to be consistent with E-LPs of the late 80s, early 90s.

    It were a mite more tore-up, so it wound up being a project guitar. Previous owner replaced the stock Edwards/Navigator TRC with a Gibby bell-shaped one, plus painted up the cavities with shielding paint, which would have covered any markings in the pickup cavities. Original bone nut was cut to damn near the fret board, so that needed to be replaced. Screws were very corroded, and it looked like the pots and caps were replaced, which prevented further dating.

    My mods were a new bone nut, corroded screws got a good soaking in distilled vinegar, replaced the guts with CTS pots, orange drop caps, and Switchcraft switch and jack. Kept the previous owner's shielding paint and replacement TRC, even though it made any further identification of the Edwards moot.
     
  2. LTigh

    LTigh Junior Member

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    Brief Ramblings:

    Comparing them to my other Edwards E-LP Standards, it's much more Gibby-like it terms of feel and tone. It's heavier than the E-LP 85/92SD from the late 90's/early 00s, but feels more balanced. The body carve is very later/modern Gibson rather than ESP's preferred deep-dish '59 carve. The Stock ESP pups have more of a midrange fatness and honk than the SDs on the later models.

    Overall, it has more of a hand-crafted feel to it than the new models. The E-LP 125SD I bought new has some of the tightest tolerances of any guitar I've ever owned, but the Plaintop has it same, but more in a "some craftsman damn near 30 years ago spend ridiculous amounts of man-hours making sure all this stuff fit perfectly" way rather than "precision CNC machine plus newer generation of still-just-as-meticulous ESP craftsman."

    tl;dr: Old Edwards E-LP is old. Definitely a step up in quality from the newer Edwards, not to take anything away from them.

    [​IMG]
    Left-to-right: Old-school E-LP (possibly E-LP 70S), Mid-school late 90s/early00s E-LP 85/92SD, New-hotness E-LP 125SD

    [​IMG]
    New hotness vs Old-School.
     
    jimmyjames, nigelthebald and paruwi like this.
  3. jimmyjames

    jimmyjames Senior Member

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    Arse-kickin' axe mate, well bought :cheers2:
     
  4. wulfman

    wulfman ABB Fan Premium Member

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    Congrats! I had a couple of those in the same orange finish. Killer guitars that compare well with anything MIJ. The inlays are just regular acrylic, no MOP there like on a LP custom. Here is one of the ones I owned.
    They came with a 1-screw truss rod cover but have enough space to put in a second screw to fit a Gibson TRC.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2017
  5. PermissionToLand

    PermissionToLand Senior Member

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    They weren't MIJ?

    And to the OP: you bought a guit with a Rosewood fretboard from Japan? Did that whole CITES thing blow over? I haven't kept up with it.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2017
  6. wulfman

    wulfman ABB Fan Premium Member

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    No, they are MIJ as far as I know. I just meant that they are as good as it gets!
     
  7. LTigh

    LTigh Junior Member

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    Yeah, I did. It were a calculated risk. The guitar was priced criminally low, and I figured that while I wouldn't be happy if it were a casualty of the tree-huggers, I could live with the hit.

    Also, based on a limited amount of data points from... Other people what have similar interests, seems Customs tends to push through anything under an arbitrary declared value. The more expensive stuff tends to get more scrutiny.

    Not gonna recommend this as a strategy, lest some idiot tries the same thing with a much more expensive guitar without documents and decides that I'm liable for their loss and stupidity.

    Like I said, calculated risk, in addition to work-induced delirium at the time of purchase.
     
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  8. ivieleague

    ivieleague Junior Member

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    Yes, great guitar. I bought one off wulfman about 5-6 years ago (in the pics he linked) and still have it. I had a Gibson Traditional LP that I bought afterwards and hardly played because of that guitar. Now that I have a Gibson LP Standard the Edwards doesn't get as much attention though. But I will probably never let it go. I let people play it and they are blown away with how nice it is. Usually their first words after playing it are "if you ever sell it, let me know".
     
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  9. Angus Blackmore

    Angus Blackmore Member

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    What year's your Standard that trumped the Trad (and what year was the trad)?
     
  10. Mockbel

    Mockbel Senior Member

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    This guitar is beautiful... congratulations !
     
  11. ivieleague

    ivieleague Junior Member

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    The trad was a 14. The 120 year anniversary one. Don't get me wrong it was a very nice guitar, but I did not like the fat neck. The Edwards has a slimmer neck so I played it more. The standard is a 16. The Edwards and the Standard have similar necks, with the standard being faster in my opinion. The tone on the two are totally different though. I prefer the way the Edwards sounds but prefer the playability of the standard. Both play very nice and both sound awesome.
     
  12. Angus Blackmore

    Angus Blackmore Member

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    Not too dissimilar from my situation. I also have a '14 Trad and the neck is excessively fat I think. It used to get the least play (see signature) but since I got rid of the stock pickups I play all equally. Someday I'd love to compare my 3 Les Pauls to a Standard.
     
  13. NJDevil

    NJDevil Senior Member

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    The fat neck is the reason I bought the '14 LP Traditional. Through the '90s, I noticed I wasn't improving (although I only played Strats) After buying a Gretsch Black Phoenix in '09, I noticed the wider and fatter neck helped immensely. I have an Edwards LP-92 and the Tokai LS-135 which are nice but the the beef of the '14 Traditional helped the most...and '59 reissue pickups blew me away. Of the 12 electrics I own, the Traditional is my favorite to play.
     
  14. currypowder

    currypowder Senior Member

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    I keep hearing about this arbitrary declared value that would cause scrutiny from customs, but does anyone have any real experience with a more expensive guitar being detained and/or destroyed? Seems there is a bunch of speculation on this point.

    In my opinion, US customs has no real authority to deny entry to a guitar containing regular (non-Brazilian) rosewood. As we know, the CITES rules designated non-Brazilian rosewood as an Appendix 2 item. Based on documents on the US Department of Fish & Wildlife, Appendix 2 items DO NOT require an import permit. Here is a .pdf from them that is pretty clear:

    https://www.fws.gov/international/pdf/factsheet-cites-permits-and-certificates-2013.pdf

    Appendix 1 items (Brazilian rosewood) are a different story, they DO require an import certificate.

    What this tells me is that the risky point isn't US customs, rather it's Japan customs at the point of export. Who really knows how diligent they are. Could I be wrong? Of course. I'm not an import/export lawyer, so don't take anything I say as truth.

    I'm going to continue to take the calculated risk of buying guitars from Japan regardless of CITES (except, of course, those with Brazilian rosewood). But I'm keeping the values at a fairly low level so that if I'm wrong, it won't hurt too much. I'll be the first to let everyone know if I end up running into a problem. Like the OP, I'm not recommending this to anyone unless you are fully prepared to take a complete loss on any guitar coming this way.
     

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