Neck Dings? How to fix?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by orys, Oct 6, 2017.

  1. orys

    orys Senior Member

    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    20
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2014
    Hi there!

    I've got this Navigator N-LP-380LTD, and the neck is full of dings. I mean the whole surface area is literally full of them. The previous owner must've been wearing rings or something. Sometimes they bother me too much, sometimes they don't.
    Any ideas how to fix this?
    I know i could sand the whole neck to the bare wood and then use some Danish oil or linseed oil as i did on some of my strats, however i wanted to know if there's any other way to fix it without removing the lacquer.

    1056.JPG 1057.JPG 1059.JPG 1060.JPG 1061.JPG 1062.JPG 1063.JPG 1064.JPG 1065.JPG 1066.JPG

    Thanks in advance.
    Tio
     
  2. rockstar232007

    rockstar232007 Senior Member

    Messages:
    14,781
    Likes Received:
    10,283
    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2008
     
    orys likes this.
  3. orys

    orys Senior Member

    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    20
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2014
    Is this really gonna work over nitro finish and the neck is not flat. It's full of them!
     
  4. ramaglia375

    ramaglia375 Premium Member

    Messages:
    399
    Likes Received:
    534
    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2016
    I am NOT a Luthier but had a neck dent as well as others on the back of a 2014 Trad. Also had a finish repair in a 2014 Studio w/ gloss finish.
    I attempted to use the steam method on the dents but had no luck. I have successfully done it on gun stocks so I can't say for sure why. So I then purchased sand paper from Stew Mac and Amazon from like 600 grit up to 10,000. It can get expensive so shop around ;)
    I also purchased a can of spray nitro from Stew Mac as well as polishing compound- medium, light and swirl remover.
    Started with the course grit sand paper, graduating to the finer and was able to polish out much of the indentations because they were in the finish only. For the deeper ones I actually sprayed a few coats of nitro to build up a finish that I could then sand smooth and polish to a gloss.
    I am glad that I did invest in materials and time to do this because I can now fix minor dents and dings.
    That being said if you don't want to do it yourself I would think a skilled luthier could easily smooth that neck out with a similar process for around what I spent in materials.

    Just my $.02, hope it helps :thumb:
     
    orys likes this.
  5. Mowgli5555

    Mowgli5555 Senior Member

    Messages:
    735
    Likes Received:
    199
    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2010
    I find it interesting to see this with guitars coming over from Japan.
    I have a couple higher end Japanese guitars, and they also have dings on the backsides of the neck.

    Luckily for me, mine aren't quite as plentiful as the Navi. Sadly, the dings are also deeper in the lacquer, and I have thought about respraying the entire neck (thankfully it is a Fender).

    If the Navi were mine, I would consider light sanding the clear coat on the neck, and respray in clear again. Do you know if it is cellulose or acrylic based lacquer? Josh

    Edit: If it was cellulose based, you could build up the clear lacquer (fill it in), and sand/buff it back nicer than it is at the moment.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2017
  6. orys

    orys Senior Member

    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    20
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2014
    It's nitro.
    I have fixed strat maple neck before which was poly. This type of nitro on the Navigator seems too thin. :(
     
  7. purpledc

    purpledc Senior Member

    Messages:
    290
    Likes Received:
    28
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2012
    The navi should be a nitro based finish. If it were my guitar I would attempt to fix one dent first to see how well the finish reacts with new nitro. I would clean one of the divots and do a drop fill with some clear just to see if the new finish will melt into the old. If it does I would sand the whole back of the neck down with a fine 3m scuff pad and respray the entire back of the neck and polish it out. Unlike poly if the two finishes are compatible it should re melt into one another, lay flat again and polish out. If the new lacquer does not melt into the old finish I would attempt to do drop fills on the bigger spots. You will see the work but if you take your time shouldn't be felt.
     
    Mowgli5555 likes this.
  8. orys

    orys Senior Member

    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    20
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2014
    I used some "Northwest Guitars Nitrocellulose Chip Repair Paint" on the back body of the guitar which is scratched to hell and it melts into it.
    I am thinking of taking the guitar to a luthier to refinish the whole back and neck or leave as it is. I just wonder if it's worth it to fix just the neck and leave the body looking as it it were tied at the back of a car.

    iyi70be5vico5loox6na.png
     
  9. Mowgli5555

    Mowgli5555 Senior Member

    Messages:
    735
    Likes Received:
    199
    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2010
    image.jpeg image.jpeg Yep... Mine isn't nearly as difficult to deal with, but it certainly makes me wonder why this area is so prone to dings in Japan. Haha. Josh
     
  10. orys

    orys Senior Member

    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    20
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2014
    My best bet is that they wear rings on their thumbs.
     
  11. Paul46

    Paul46 Senior Member

    Messages:
    779
    Likes Received:
    615
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Those Navigators are such nice guitars that, if it were mine, I would have the body and neck refinished. I hate dings you can feel in the neck!
     
  12. Troy McClure

    Troy McClure Senior Member

    Messages:
    312
    Likes Received:
    53
    Joined:
    May 4, 2016
    I'd probably spray and drop fill the deeper gauges with laquer as it should all melt in, then sand and polish to a smooth finish, probably still be visible but won't feel them which is the biggy. Plenty of threads about drop filling and wet sanding plus with it being the back of the neck you won't need or want to get the same high gloss finish you'd look for with the top so should be able to manage it yourself. Getting a luthier to do it will most likey be costly as they'd need to steam it out and then refinish the neck matching any colour etc

    Had a few MIJ guitars myself and they either seem to keep them as case queens or beat the fuck out of them :) I'd guess the dings are just from being propped up against an amp etc.
     

Share This Page