MUSIC THEORY 101 Don't Be Afraid :)

Discussion in 'Guitar Lessons' started by jonesy, Sep 24, 2008.

  1. DW4LesPaul

    DW4LesPaul Senior Member

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    Jonesy,yeah it does and I have started picking up tidbits of tabs, such as the Bloomfield Stop solo, just like 4 note tabs--no one seems to have the entire solo tabbed, or, I mean, it does not exist. So yeah I am starting to understand stops and such. I have a new found excitement now! Thanks for those videos, and I'm going to watch them now. Oh yes, also, I came to the same conclusion--to stay with the minor pent/blues for now, and not simply learn another scale.

    Just watched the vids. Very much enjoyed them. Way above my skill level, but I enjoyed listening to them and watching your fingerings.
     
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  2. jonesy

    jonesy GLOBAL WIRING GURU MLP Vendor

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    Good to hear bro, Awesome + :thumb:
     
  3. DW4LesPaul

    DW4LesPaul Senior Member

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    But today I practiced for an hour and was very discouraged.it's like I don't know what to do. When I was learning the minor blues scale, I knew exactly what I needed to do. Now it's kind of like I have no idea what to do or what to play. I guess I could start learning chords at different locations on the fretboard. I mean it's like I have a lego set with key pieces missing.
     
  4. jonesy

    jonesy GLOBAL WIRING GURU MLP Vendor

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    What I use to do is listen to a lot of the types of music that I would want to play.

    Then I would try to pick out a few notes from each lead and try to play them. Work off the root note and go from there.

    It's like a puzzle, try and fit in a few pieces at a time and before you know it things will start to take shape.

    I think learning some simple blues progressions and then putting the scales over the top of them really helped me understand things much better.

    Check out "Blue Jean Blues" by ZZ top, it has some nice minor lead riffs.

    Also I learned a lot of the the early stuff that Clapton played, as well as BB King, Muddy waters, John Lee Hooker.

    The Major Pentatonic is also a scale that you can get a lot of mileage from and would be the next scale I think you should check out.

    Most of all don't forget to have fun and enjoy what you are playing.

    Have patience and try not to get discouraged, it's a long process that takes years, not days, weeks or months.

    Hang in there bro...Hope that helps. :)

    Jonesy
     
  5. DW4LesPaul

    DW4LesPaul Senior Member

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    Thanks for the words of encouragement. "I think learning some simple blues progressions and then putting the scales over the top of them really helped me understand things much better."

    That sounds pretty good. At least I know for sure what I'm suppose to be doing--learning a scale. lol

     
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  6. DW4LesPaul

    DW4LesPaul Senior Member

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  7. jonesy

    jonesy GLOBAL WIRING GURU MLP Vendor

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    No not right off hand. I mostly use 7th's, minor 7th's and 5th's (power chords) for classic rock and blues based stuff. You can see examples of them in those videos I posted earlier.
     
  8. DW4LesPaul

    DW4LesPaul Senior Member

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    I'm looking for some Chords for the A pentatonic Major, Minor, Blues scales, but not the open chords at the 2-3 fret. I'm tired of those.

     
  9. mmcquain

    mmcquain V.I.P. Member

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    Try playing around with the chord shapes up the neck...

    • D-shaped A chord at frets 9 and 10 on the top 3 strings
    • C-shaped A chord also starting at frets 9 and 10 on the top 3 strings (continued to strings 4 and 5 at frets 11 and 12)
    • Am-shaped F#m chord with the root at fret 9 of string 5
    • A-shaped barre chords for E and D (root on string 5 at frets 7 and 5 respectively)
    • Try playing the E and D barre chords but use your 3rd (ring) finger to move the root of the chord up to the 3rd of the chord on string 5 (e.g., barre E with your 1st finger instead of your 3rd finger across strings 4-3-2 at the 9th fret and use your 3rd finger to play the G# note at fret 11 on string 5)
    The above chord shapes let you work the neck in a different area than you may be used to and help you learn you to move chord shapes around the neck without having to use a capo. This allows you great flexibility since the WHOLE neck is kept open (vs. no longer having access to the frets behind wherever you place the capo).

    You'll find several "Jimi chords" (i.e., voicings used by Hendrix on songs like The Wind Cries Mary, etc.) with the shapes I mentioned above. And most of all... have fun! :thumb:
     
  10. jonesy

    jonesy GLOBAL WIRING GURU MLP Vendor

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    Take chords like E major and Em as well as A major and Am and barre them off with your first finger and then move them up the neck. Root note will either be on the 6th string or the 5th string :)

    Example: Kirks Guitar and Music Primer, Guitar for beginners
    Guitar barre chords

    E form barre chords link E Form Barre Chord

    A form barre chords link A Form Barre Chord
     
  11. DW4LesPaul

    DW4LesPaul Senior Member

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    LOL, yeah I've already discovered the Jimi intro on the top three strings. So when you say D-shaped, A chord, you mean the open D chord fingering is an A chord when played at the 9th fret and only the top three strings are hit? If so, I understand what you mean. Thanks!

     
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  12. DW4LesPaul

    DW4LesPaul Senior Member

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    I can't barre. I think my fingers are deformed. I guess I should practice barring along with the new Major pentatonic you suggested. So, at least I know what I need to practice now. That's always a good thing. Thanks again Jonesy.

     
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  13. jonesy

    jonesy GLOBAL WIRING GURU MLP Vendor

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    You're welcome bro. One of the key elements to making barre chords is getting your thumb on the back of the neck.

    It also helps to bring the elbow in closer to your body and rotate the wrist out slightly to allow your index finger to be at a right angle with the fret board (parallel to frets)

    All these things will give you the pressure you need to pinch the strings down tight so they don't buzz.

    Remember use good technique then practice, practice, practice
    :)
     
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  14. DW4LesPaul

    DW4LesPaul Senior Member

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    jonesy,

    I mean I can barre with a single finger. It's when my retarded other two or three fingers need to go someplace that the barre finger goes on vacation.

    I've been learning the major pentatonic and actually learning a lot from it. It seems easier for me to 'understand' than the minor blues, for some reason. I'm hoping the two together will unlock some more advances for me as I practice both together.

    Thanks again.

     
  15. mmcquain

    mmcquain V.I.P. Member

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    Yes, that is exactly what I mean - play the open chord shapes higher up the neck and don't play the open strings unless then happen to include notes that still fit with the chord (e.g., play the D-shape at frets 7 and 8 for a G chord and you can actually still play the open D string since a D note is one of the 3 notes that make up the G chord (G-B-D)).
     
  16. jonesy

    jonesy GLOBAL WIRING GURU MLP Vendor

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    Yeah ok, so when you try and barre the E and A shapes you need to keep up on your fingertips so you fingers are not muting out the other strings. Good technique is essential and nobody said it was going to be easy.

    It is a little easier to barre chords if you practice up around the 5th-7th fret, again "practice" being the keyword.

    BTW I really never took lessons from an instructor and learned most of my chords and the theory behind them from the Mel Bay deluxe chord encyclopedia. :)
     
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  17. DW4LesPaul

    DW4LesPaul Senior Member

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    Thanks guys. I will keep practicing for sure. I made a dealwitih myself that I would praticeand play for one year before I decide to stop or continue. I'm not even at a full 4 months yet and I have no urge to stop at all.
     
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  18. DW4LesPaul

    DW4LesPaul Senior Member

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    Am I right to see that the minor pentatonic scale is the same as the major pentatonic, scale, just moved up 3 frets for any key (or down)? So in other words, if you play the minor pentatonic in A, and you wanted to play the major pentatonic in A, you would just move the shape up the neck 3 frets?

    If so, that would mean you were also playing the minor pentatonic in another key, or two ways of stating the same thing?
     
  19. huw

    huw V.I.P. Member

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    Right idea, wrong direction - you go down the neck.

    A minor shape at 5th fret, go down to 2nd fret and lay the same shape for A major, or F' minor, which contains the same notes.
     
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  20. DW4LesPaul

    DW4LesPaul Senior Member

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    Had the wrong terminology, but that's what I meant. So if you know the minor pentatonic scale, you really know all of the shapes for the major pentatonic scale?

    Question: What is the best next scale to learn? I want to play mostly blues, blues/jazz fusion type music. I'm not interested in rock or metal, but some folk like music is ok, unless you consider Neil Young rock. I was thinking about Jazz bebop?

    In summary, if I know the minor pentatonic blues scale, I also, know the shapes for the
    1. Minor pentatonic
    2. Major pentatonic
    3. Major pentatonic blues
    ?

    If so, I just need a scale close enough related in the jazz area that would best accompany those scales (or I guess I should say 'scale family').

     

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