More colourised WWII photographs

Discussion in 'The Backstage' started by Gooner, Sep 8, 2016.

  1. Gooner

    Gooner Senior Member

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    Daily Mail is a rubbish news source but this is another good article where the original photo's have been colourised to make them relate better. Personally, I like the b&w, but if it helps more people to look and take note, I'm in favour.....

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...ized-photographs-Europe-Second-World-War.html

    Here's one, Buck Compton....

    [​IMG]
     
    DADGAD, Roberteaux, JTM45 and 2 others like this.
  2. MenaceMartin

    MenaceMartin Senior Member

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    That's pretty awesome! Nice one :)

    I visit Shorpy quite often. It also has some real cracking high res pictures. Worth a look if you like classic pics! (Categories are down the right-hand side).
     
  3. Gooner

    Gooner Senior Member

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    Thanks, I'll take a look:thumb:
     
  4. Guitarhack

    Guitarhack Senior Member

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    Band of Brothers is a fantastic book. It brings the events and actions that those soldiers endured to life. Buck Compton, like the rest of the soldiers in the 101st Airborne were the real deal.

    Richard Winters

    [​IMG]

    This is a very cool picture of the 442nd Color Guard. The story of the 442nd is very cool, it was comprised of Japanese Americans, many whose families were in the internment camps. The 442nd Regiment was the most decorated unit for its size and length of service in the history of American warfare. The 4,000 men who initially made up the unit in April 1943 had to be replaced nearly 2.5 times. In total, about 14,000 men served, earning 9,486 Purple Hearts. The unit was awarded eight Presidential Unit Citations (five earned in one month). Twenty-one of its members were awarded Medals of Honor.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. ehb

    ehb Chief Discombobulator Premium Member

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    Decades back, my mom used to hand color black and white portraits... Pretty amazing what she could do.... Now, it's digital...
     
  6. jeff_farkas

    jeff_farkas Senior Member

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    Thanks for sharing.
     
  7. John Vasco

    John Vasco I'm with the band V.I.P. Member

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    This is wrong in one of the captions: "...during World War II however members of the African American 92 Infantry were the only ones that engaged in combat..."

    I think the Tuskegee airmen would have something to say about that...
     
  8. Bigfoot410

    Bigfoot410 Premium Member

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    Fantastic pics.

    Keep them accurate Mr. Vasco! This is a history that must remain undistorted. :)
     
  9. bocage44

    bocage44 Premium Member

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    As would the 761st Tank Battalion....
     
  10. Bill Hicklin

    Bill Hicklin Senior Member

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    As well as the 761st Tank Battalion

    --Gen George S. Patton
     
  11. Bill Hicklin

    Bill Hicklin Senior Member

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    What I don't get is, in the comments, the very large number of whinges by certain Britons complaining that the story and Mr Enos' work are part of the "Yanks won the war all by themselves" conspiracy.

    Blimey, chaps-
    1) Mr Enos is an American, soo it's unsurprising that would be his focus; and
    2) US military photo archives are public domain, whereas British military photogs' work is under Crown copyright.
     
  12. Roberteaux

    Roberteaux V.I.P. Member

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    I had a friend who served in that unit. His name was William Sheppard, and he served as a captain in the 761st. Everybody who knew the guy called him by his nickname, which was Captain Goodie-- as he spelled it.

    Bored by retirement, he ran a shoeshine concession in a business that was within my patrol zone. One day I received a call to respond to an unspecified disturbance that somehow involved his little shoeshine business. I got there quickly, to find that three KKK members were badgering him-- or trying to, rather...

    He was basically standing before them defiantly, telling them where to stick it, when I showed up. Captain Goodie was only about 5'5" tall, and would have weighed about 97 pounds if his clothes were sopping wet. But there was still a lot of fight in that old dawg, and I couldn't get over the sort of language he was using on the klan guys, who were noticeably shaken by their encounter with him. Every one of those guys was bigger than me, and they dwarfed Captain Goodie. But he was telling them he'd kick their asses anyway-- and that's even though I was coming up behind him and he didn't realize I was there! :laugh2:

    Gotta love it! I got the klan dudes to fork over I.D.'s and ran F.I.'s on all of 'em... we'd arrested several members of that group a few years earlier, and I figured that maybe they meant to start raising hell again-- but they were clean and so I just shooed them away.

    After that, I went back to chat with the Captain. He was still fuming, but eventually saw the humor I found in it. Those guys were as white as their sheets when Captain Goodie more or less treed them, and were still too shocked to build up the head of angry steam they'd need to clobber him when I showed up to intervene. The incident began when they decided to tauntingly present him with one of their KKK business cards, and developed from there when he began to evince his distinct reaction towards them. Man, they weren't ready for that! :laugh2:

    I knew that Mr. Sheppard was an officer in the 761st before this incident took place. He wore a vest with military patches and a hat that identified him as such. I had attempted to get the old boy to tell me a few war stories before the KKK deal went down. But, like most vets who saw a lot of action, he really didn't wish to discuss it much.

    That day, however, he reacted to my praise of his pluck in the face of the klan by telling me that he'd never back down to the KKK. He had apparently fought against an SS unit and knew first hand just how tough it gets. He called the KKK guys "punk terrorists" and described the SS as having been superbly trained, well-equipped, and highly motivated-- way worse than the night-riding, back-shooting KKK, he said. He then went on to recount one gory incident that convinced him that he was fighting some of the hardest troops out there. He admitted that he expected to get his ass kicked by those klan guys-- but screw 'em, he wasn't gonna back down anyway. Not after fighting the racist warriors of the SS.

    But then he clammed up again. He said that he lived it once, no point in living it forever.

    I didn't point out to him that he tended to self identify as an officer of the 761st, for knowing that whether a man likes it or not, military service of any type puts an indelible stamp on him that he can live down-- but which he can never quite relieve himself of.

    He was quite a man, that Captain Goodie. I miss him.

    --R
     

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