Mayall/Clapton

Discussion in 'The Backstage' started by Frogfur, Jun 23, 2017.

  1. Frogfur

    Frogfur Senior Member

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    Friday Morning Music

    Are you a John Mayall, Eric Clapton fan ?
    You should like this. Best version without the horns. You can hear better what Clapton was doing.
    My favorite version.

    The interesting thing about the Mayall/Clapton period is that what they sounded like live, and what they could do in the studio were two different things at that that time when available recordings are compared.

    The studio version is probably the best liked because of the addition of the horn section, and because of the famous tone Clapton got recording that particular LP amp combination.




    Clapton with Mayall, Hideaway Live
    https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=SZQLhQ0apOU&feature=share

    If Clapton could have been producing that killer tone on stage, that would be out there during the Yardbird/Mayall transition period somewhere. That is Until he switched from the telecaster to the LP.
    I actually liked the dry Marshall sound without distortion.

    Eric Clapton, Jack Bruce and Stevie Winwood. Paul Jones on harmonica, and Pete York(from the Spencer Davis Group) on drums. Originally, Ginger Baker was dispose to do the gig, but was unavailable.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2017
  2. Crotch

    Crotch Delete My Account Entirely Double Platinum Supporter Premium Member

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    I love Clapton above all others. But, I'm in the minority. I'm almost bored with the bluesbreakers album. I've tried, and I know it's blasphemy, but I truthfully prefer puffy shoulder pad 80s electronica Clapton over John mayall. I will however give these a listen at work tomorrow. I want to like. Thanks for posting.
     
  3. Frogfur

    Frogfur Senior Member

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    You think your in a pickle..I've heard it since 1966! But there are some interesting points here. That's the subject matter.
     
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  4. CRobbins

    CRobbins Premium Member

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    I saw Mayall and the bluesbreakers at the Roxy in Los Angeles around 1982, but it was with Mick Taylor, John McVie, and Mick Fleetwood.:dude::dude:
     
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  5. Frogfur

    Frogfur Senior Member

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    I always thought Mick Taylor was the best of the Clapton clones. He had the phrasing, he had the tone of the times.
     
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  6. CRobbins

    CRobbins Premium Member

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    Blues from Laurel Canyon was my 1st Mayall album
     
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  7. geochem1st

    geochem1st V.I.P. Member

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    that's the first I've heard that Clapton didn't get that Beano sound live. I always thought that the BBC engineers in the early to mid '60's turned everything down as distortion was considered something undesirable. Hendrix had the same problem with early BBC recordings.
     
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  8. Frogfur

    Frogfur Senior Member

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    That true for the
    That is true of BBC, even for Beck and others as well. But you won't hear any beano in the Yardbirds with the telecaster.. (which belonged to the band)not Clapton.

    But during the transition period, and then Mayall that changed. When he acquired the LP, Marshall amp combo that he started getting those sounds, mostly with Mayall. When the Fresh Cream came along, bigger amps and different guitars and direction for clapton. But man, that phrasing, fingers dripping tone.

    But it was Keef that was the first to realize the potential of the Les Paul guitar I think.
    Of the Brits anyway.

    I got that beano album in 1966 and i still have it. Just thought some different views of Mayall, and Clapton were doing back then.

    I remember Bloomfield saying once there was no better guitar player better than himself. But he also said, there is this cat in England, Eric Clapton, he's pretty good.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2017
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  9. tazzboy

    tazzboy V.I.P. Member

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    Clapton was good with Mayall, but got better when he joined Cream.
     
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  10. Benjammin

    Benjammin Senior Member

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    personally I prefer Mayall when he had Peter Green with him


     
  11. Cozmik Cowboy

    Cozmik Cowboy Senior Member

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    Clapton's a great rock guitarist. On a good day he's an adequate blues guitarist.
     
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  12. Dilemma

    Dilemma Loud Pipes Ruin Naps Premium Member

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    The various incarnations of EC -

    Yardbirds; Started as the hired gun, passed the baton to Jeff Beck who nobody understood and still doesn't, who then passed the baton to Jimmy Page who broke up the Yardbirds and founded Led Zeppelin by ripping off other peoples music.

    Mayall; I suspect in order to fully appreciate this you had to experience it back when it happened. Clapton channels Joe Bonamassa without the bitchin' guitar collection, donned Armani over 50 years later sans sunglasses.

    Cream; A bunch of mindless wankery played by a white guy with an afro. Cream was known for twenty minute guitar masturbations which sent everyone to the concession stand for beer and tube top wearing weed smoking cuties.

    Blind Faith; Six lousy songs with an album cover that sent Jimmy Page to the closet with a tube sock and his yogurt slinger. Wholly unremarkable effort. EC couldn't find his way home but thankfully found his way out of this band.

    Delaney and Bonnie; See Blind Faith minus the creepy album cover and Steve Winwood.

    Derek and the Dominoes; Clapton finds his mojo by nailing his friends wife, a marginally attractive beatnik chick with the morals of an alley cat. Worst friend ever. When people say they don't get EC, this is presented as evidence they should. At least as far as guitar playing is concerned.

    Solo Clapton; Contemporary Adult easy listening. It is indeed in the way that you use it, or in EC's case - used it.

    Honorable Mention - Clapton Unplugged; EC manages to find a way to ruin "Layla." Suburban housewives from coast to coast swoon, the record flies off the shelf and spawns myriad imitations by musicians who's plugged in versions sucked to begin with.

    Dilemma.
     
  13. Bluesky

    Bluesky Premium Member

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    I respectfully disagree. Clapton started the revolution. He could have easily made 5-6 more killer blues discs. But then he would be about as famous as Peter , or Mick Taylor.
    Clapton went mainstream and found a ghostwriter in JJ Cale because IT PAID.

    And he has gone back and thrown everyone of them , from BBKing, to Cream, to JJ a bone.
     
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  14. DotStudio

    DotStudio Silver Supporter

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    And I still loved every minute of it :wave:
     
  15. RichBrew

    RichBrew Senior Member

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    For me he was at his pinnacle with Cream; my kind of band (loud jazz), with the mindset to take the music wherever it wanted to go on the night and to hell with the vocal chores. I have always thought singing was just a waste of time between solos.

    Referring to the original post, I came late to the Bluesbreakers record (1969), but for several years that LP was my guitar Bible. However, I based the whole of my technique on Steppin' Out from Live Cream Vol II, which I mastered in 1972.
     
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  16. bulletproof

    bulletproof aka tarddoggy Premium Member V.I.P. Member

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    Honestly,I love it all....:hippie:
     
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  17. Bluesky

    Bluesky Premium Member

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    Believe it or not......i love the mid 70s really laid back burnt out reggae influenced jams like on There one in every crowd. Just Blackie and a 50 w Music Mann combo. I almost can't stand what he's doing now. Sock? Works great as a beer coaster.

    I know Clapton wasn't in a great place spiritually in the 70s and I'm sorry for that.....but the music was great!
     
  18. Frogfur

    Frogfur Senior Member

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    The BBC didn't like distortion, but it is evident that Clapton is not playing at the volume of the beano album, but at an intentional lower volume.
     
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  19. Frogfur

    Frogfur Senior Member

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    It ok if you don't like him as a guitarist, but I think you are totally wrong. But your opinion is welcime, like all others.
     
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  20. Howard2k

    Howard2k Premium Member

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    Not going to argue too much with these points!

    When it comes to blues, I think it really comes alive when it's, ugh, live. I like Cream, and love the D&TD. D&TD was the pinnacle IMO. Especially live.

    For his Mayall stuff, some of it was fantastic, but to be honest I kinda like Mayall with Peter Green and Mick Taylor a little more I think. There's not as much live content around as I would like for any of them, but from what I've heard when it comes to live work all three periods were great, but Clapton might just be my third favourite.
     
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