Keep Your Guitar in Tune : changing and stretching new strings

Discussion in 'Guitar Lessons' started by Malikon, Nov 18, 2012.

  1. Malikon

    Malikon ジャンプアップ V.I.P. Member

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    I've adjusted Strats that were in tune. You just need to make sure that the screwdriver is a perfect fit, so it doesn't strip the screwhead.

    ...but that applies to any situation where you use a screwdriver.

    The proper screwdriver head in the proper screw, can't strip out,...in my experience. It grips too well to 'skip' across the screw.

    ...that being said,..if I were tightening the claw (which would raise the string pitch even higher,..increasing the tension)...then yeah I'd loosen the strings first.


    ...that was one of the things the bugged the sh*t out of me about Strats,...actually maybe the only thing. I had to do setups on it at least once a month because the saddles would move.

    And then instead of adjusting 2 screws (like on an LP) you're adjust 12 tiny little allen screws,..2 in each saddle.

    That got real old real quick. :laugh2:

    I prefer the sound and feel of an LP,..but I LOVE how much easier they are to setup.

    Well cut nut, proper relief in the neck via T-rod adjustment, and set the bridge/string height? That's it,...You're off and racing.

    No constant tuning and retuning,..adjusting a couple things, retuning,..adjusting a couple things,..retuning.

    Strats are great guitars,...but damn they're a lot of work to keep running in a perfect and optimal state.

    ...at least in my experience. It became a real chore keeping it optimal 100% of the time.
     
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  2. MooCheng

    MooCheng Senior Member

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    yeah they do tend to move, loctight or nail varnish on the threads stops 'em loosing an they can still be adjusted later if you want to, Dont use paint, I found out that was,nt a good idea :)

    like the vid' btw
     
  3. AJBehrens

    AJBehrens Junior Member

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  4. Plant

    Plant Member

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    Has anyone else ever been tightening the low-E, without noticing that it wasn't in the nut, and was being wound against the headstock leaving a dent?

    No, just me being a plonker then :slash:
     
  5. Plant

    Plant Member

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    Is it possible to over-tighten a string when putting it on? My D string sounds a but twangy (as if it isn't actually tight enough, even though it is in tune) and I am wondering if I damaged the string by tuning way past the D (I wasn't paying attention)?
     
  6. 357mag

    357mag Member

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    Nothing wrong with import guitars. Having a $2500.00 Gibson isn't gonna make you sound or play better, nor is it gonna stay in tune any better. It's all bull****.
     
  7. Thugstrings

    Thugstrings Junior Member

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    Bookmarked. Thanks for sharing this!
     
  8. Malikon

    Malikon ジャンプアップ V.I.P. Member

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    no problem.

    I see a lot of people complain about how Les Pauls wont stay in tune and I honestly never have that problem, not with any of them. So I don't think it's the Les Pauls. :laugh2:
     
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  9. NorlinBlackBeauty

    NorlinBlackBeauty Member

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    Nice vid, especially for those who have not done this.

    I've been at this a long time. I've always looped the string under and over at the start to insure a secure lock. Makes them a tiny bit harder to remove, but they are not going to slip.

    Lemon oil is a subject of some debate. I used it back in the day - no longer. The acidity can have a negative effect should any make its way into the frets. Martin guitar specifically states to avoid lemon oil. They recommend 3 in 1 oil or what is currently used at the factory (been there 3 times) Dr. Duck's Ax Wax (no wax in it).

    I use a tiny drop on a clean cotton rag, rub it in to the wood one or two sections at a time to clean finger grime, then buff what little excess is left off. No real need to let it soak in. Your mileage may vary ...

    I pull the strings to stretch as well, but only 2 or 3 times. I may try more.

    This may be mentioned here as well - wash your hands well before playing (and changing strings) if you are able. Carefully wipe your strings down after playing with a clean cotton cloth. Your strings will thank you for it by lasting longer.
     

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