Just got a 1962 LP Junior. A few questions...

Discussion in 'Vintage SG' started by ejendres, Jan 3, 2017.

  1. ejendres

    ejendres Senior Member

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    What is a safe way to clean the finish? Its covered in gunk from being poorly stored for years.

    There is finger gunk on the fretboard, what can I do to clean this off? I'm going to hit it with some danish oil but I want to get the gunk off first.

    Are the tuners safe to use? I've had a Kluson crumble on me before so I'm always nervous about using plastic buttoned tuners. The last thing I want to do is have them crumble. If they are safe to use what is a good lubricant to use on them? They are not smooth turning at all.
     
  2. gianni_boy

    gianni_boy Senior Member

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    Hey....since people view these treads and rarely answer on this forum I will chime in because getting no answers is frustrating ( I'm dealing with that problem currently lol)......for a fretboard I would usually get off the big gunk by getting a thin/medium pick and scrapping it off carefully..... then give the frets and fret bored a light buffing with 000 steel wool.....after this step all the major gunk should be off......then apply a liberal amount of lemon oil on the board....let it sit for a half hour and wipe off the excess aggressively with a rag.....repeat if necessary.
    For the body, neck and steel components a general finish Polish....there is one that gibson makes that is safe for nitro and steel parts.
    But if the finish has alot or weather checking then I would wipe in the area of the checking because you don't want to get crap in the fine lines. But don't clean it up too much...the old semi hazy finish looks cool.
    Nope this helped
     
  3. gianni_boy

    gianni_boy Senior Member

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    P.s.....for the tuners you can put a dab of WD40 or a touch of 3 in 1 lube
     
  4. skydog

    skydog Senior Member

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    Naphtha and Preservation Polish
     
  5. charlie chitlins

    charlie chitlins Senior Member

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    Naphtha is great on fretboards.
    Scrape with a credit card.
    Squarer edge than a pick.
    Stay away from steel wool fer cryin' out loud!
    It's STEEL and will turn the underside of your pickup into a furry monster.
    I'm not sure if it was done from the factory, but many of these tuners are full of grease which eventually gets hard and waxy, makes them hard to turn and puts undue stress on the old buttons.
    I take them off, tape up the buttons and clean them real well with carburetor cleaner.
    Then squirt in some white lithium grease.
     
  6. Greg's Guitars

    Greg's Guitars Senior Member

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    spit.....seriously.....ask Dan Erlewine.
     
  7. marksoundguitars

    marksoundguitars Chief Paint Sniffer MLP Vendor

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    Naphtha to clean a fretboard gets a +1 from me. Finger cheese is nasty. I use mineral oil on a paper towel to refresh a rosewood board.

    Danish oil is a finish. I don't think I'd use it on a fretboard.
     
  8. reedy

    reedy Senior Member

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    Naptha also works great on the finish, it will not hurt it and will help get rid of a lot of the grime that is on there too. If the fretboard is all gunked up chances are the rest of the guitar is too.
     
  9. kakerlak

    kakerlak Senior Member

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    I actually like steel wool for rosewood, but I'd go 0000, rather than 000; you don't need the extra abrasiveness of 000, plus 0000 is handy stuff to have around for cleaning up chrome-plated stuff. If you can lay a cloth or something over your pickup, it'll catch the buildup of steel fibers. Nice part about the steel wool is it does a great job of polishing up the frets in addition to cleaning gunk off the fretboard. Just go with the grain and you'll be fine.

    As for the buttons, if the plastic is degrading, you can usually tell so by sight -- if they look shrunken in a bit, or like they've got a whitish haze on them, they might be going south. I think it's more the '50s ones that crumbled. If they are crumbling, but still intact, I've had great success stabilizing them with repeated baths of super glue, which seems to absorb into the plastic and seal it off so it's hard and stable. I've even built back half a (bean-shaped) button that was missing with baking soda and super glue and it's held since.

    I've not tried lubricating any, but the suggestions you've gotten here sound promising -- sometimes stiff ones loosen up just with a little use, though.
     
  10. kakerlak

    kakerlak Senior Member

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    Take the pickguard and truss rod cover off before you hit the guitar with naptha (ask me why I know...).
     
  11. charlie chitlins

    charlie chitlins Senior Member

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    Go ahead...use steel wool...because NOTHING else does the same thing...not scotch-brite or ANYTHING...:hmm:
     

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  12. Darth Mildly Grumpy

    Darth Mildly Grumpy Senior Member

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    If you are getting that much steel wool dust under your pickup, you're doing it wrong.
    Masking tape over the pickup and a little care.
     
  13. charlie chitlins

    charlie chitlins Senior Member

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    I'm not the one who used the steel wool.
    No need for masking tape if you use something else.
     
  14. kmasters68

    kmasters68 Senior Member

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    Cautious use of steel wool is fine, but yeah, there's magnets in there.
     
  15. Xrun Morzov

    Xrun Morzov Senior Member

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    Dr Duck's does it for me - fretboard, body, metal parts.
     
  16. kakerlak

    kakerlak Senior Member

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    Yeah, that's why you let the magnets work for, rather than against you. Lay a cloth or something over the pickups and let the magnets draw all the steel particles to the cloth -- easy cleanup.
     

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