Jimmy Page, The Greatest Rock Guitarist Of All Time

Discussion in 'The Cellar' started by Torren61, Sep 29, 2009.

  1. Torren61

    Torren61 Senior Member

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    I wouldn't want Halford to own me. You know what he does to a guy when he owns them... :shock:
     
  2. Ledheadforlife

    Ledheadforlife Senior Member

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    Rob may be kinda light on his feet, but that boy can wail like a banshee.
     
  3. X–Ray

    X–Ray Cowbell by Misadventure Premium Member

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    you are still young, they are still needed :thumb:
     
  4. Torren61

    Torren61 Senior Member

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    Don't stop the guy if that's what he wants to do.
     
  5. X–Ray

    X–Ray Cowbell by Misadventure Premium Member

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    eeh? speak up lad, i am earless :)
     
  6. Death Incarnate

    Death Incarnate Premium V.I.P. Premium Member V.I.P. Member

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    Jimmy Page is the man and guitar playing begins and ends with him to me.
    As cliche as it sounds, I picked up a guitar as a suburban stoner teenager because of Led Zeppelin.

    Beyond his guitar chops and song arrangement skills, always keep in mind he was producer/co-engineer on all those albums. Things so great because he was a BRILLIANT producer and understood so much of getting sounds and tones was from room mic placement, layering tracks, etc. That was always his true brilliance to me.

    Then again, I watch anything on the Zeppelin DVD and am floored at his improvisational stuff.
     
  7. Ledheadforlife

    Ledheadforlife Senior Member

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    Yep.
     
  8. Torren61

    Torren61 Senior Member

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    Some guys throw in "sloppy" when describing his playing style... I love that style. It shows "soul". Now he may not OWN that soul, considering his ties to Alister Crowley, but he is still a guitar legend in very sense of the word.
     
  9. bon-yr-aur

    bon-yr-aur Senior Member

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    i will always say that page is my favorite figure in music ever i think he is the best by a long shot but then again who am i to say who is the best for that matter who is anyone to say that someone is the best at anything?
     
  10. Torren61

    Torren61 Senior Member

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    I think you got the point of the thread.
     
  11. X–Ray

    X–Ray Cowbell by Misadventure Premium Member

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    [FONT=&quot]"the best" is whomever and/or whatever is "the best" for you, and those who
    wholeheartedly agree with your opinion...

    however, when you believe your opinion is an objective realism and
    express it to the point of dogmatism, that is when your opinion
    ceases to be credible and becomes an [/FONT][FONT=&quot]arrogant assertion of the improvable[/FONT][FONT=&quot]

    for example, from the perspective of objective realism, other than my opinion,
    i have no evidence Jeff Beck is the greatest rock guitarist of all time,
    nor do i have evidence Jimmy Page is the greatest rock guitarist of all time
    or the inverse, the worst [/FONT][FONT=&quot]rock guitarist of all time[/FONT]
    [FONT=&quot]
    anyone can insert the name of their "the best" into the blank (fill in the best)
    is the greatest rock guitarist (or whatever) of all time

    [/FONT][FONT=&quot]although, i will say, when i saw Zeppelin in ‘77, my opinion of Jimmy’s playing that night alternated
    between disbelief of sonic wizardry to being embarrassed for him if he was not already for himself[/FONT]

    [FONT=&quot]on the other hand, i left the concert with the opinion i had heard the greatest rock drummer
    of all time; John Henry Bonham[/FONT]

    [FONT=&quot]excellent statement of your credible opinion and understanding the difference
    between facts and opinions without being dogmatic :~)[/FONT]
     
  12. snag

    snag Member

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    Did Jimmy steal Zoso?
     
  13. tao_of_drew

    tao_of_drew Senior Member

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  14. planks

    planks Senior Member

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  15. Ledheadforlife

    Ledheadforlife Senior Member

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    Bump for the most important thread in the history of the interwebz
     
  16. Jimmy Page

    Jimmy Page Senior Member

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    He's without a doubt my favourite guitarist of all time, always has been, ever since i was a kid. Jimmy was probably the main reason i picked up a guitar in the first place. Although i rate Rory Gallagher very, very highly also, without a doubt my second favourite. Then probably followed by SRV, Allen Collins, Gary Rossington, Duane Allman and countless others. It's impossible to say who's the best, second best, and so on, at the end of the day it's all matter of opinion i guess. But Page is my No. 1.
     
  17. EasyAce

    EasyAce Senior Member

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    You may or may not be right. But the first time I heard the '59 burst as the marvel it was (and is) was thanks to this gentleman, well enough before anyone heard of Jimmy Page slinging his Burst . . .

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5WPyzqRjSI0]Mike Bloomfield and Al Kooper, "Blues for Nothing" (Super Session outtake)[/ame]


    (For those who didn't know or don't remember---Mike Bloomfield landed his '59 Burst during his last days with the Butterfield Blues Band, swapping a '54 goldtop and $100 to Dan Erlewine for the 'burst . . . )
     
  18. SoloDallas

    SoloDallas Senior Member

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    Not surprising, balance, and well expressed.
     
  19. EasyAce

    EasyAce Senior Member

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    You may remember this from Dave Marsh, in Rock and Soul Music: The 1001 Greatest Singles Ever Made, about "Hide Away": If you can imagine one song inspiring Cream's Wheels of Fire, which is exactly what it did, "Hide Away" will grab you as very rock and roll indeed.

    Some other such relevancies from the 1960s/1970s (and the poster to whom you replied should remember that Muddy Waters was right: The blues had a baby and they named it rock and roll. Granted that the child could often be tried for attempted patricide . . . ):

    Ramblin' On My Mind (Eric Clapton's first Robert Johnson calling card, in John Mayall's Blues Breakers)

    Stones in My Passway (from whence Led Zeppelin nicked the verse about the lemon)

    Killing Floor (from whence Led Zeppelin nicked the main body of "The Lemon Song")

    From Four Until Late (which may have been the first time anyone in the rock mainstream heard Robert Johnson at all, thanks to Eric Clapton's re-imagining of the song for Fresh Cream)

    Walking Blues (Paul Butterfield had a whack at it in late 1966, then Taj Mahal made it one of his calling cards come 1968 . . .)

    Rock Me Baby (if there's one B.B. King number that got beaten to death and back in the 1960s and 1970s---from Jimi Hendrix, Jefferson Airplane, Blue Cheer, and the early Savoy Brown right down to Robin Trower), "Rock Me Baby" was she . . . )

    Messin' with the Kid (which Steppenwolf remade into "Tighten Up Your Wig" and actually apologised lyrically to Junior Wells in the final verse for copping his calling card . . . )

    Drinkin' Wine, Spo-De-O-Dee (the Stick McGhee---as in, brother of Brownie---chestnut which became a kind-of calling card, as "Wine," for Mike Bloomfield's Electric Flag)

    Hoochie Coochie Man (which may have begun getting a bigger audience when Steppenwolf included it on their first album . . . )
    Spoonful

    Sittin' on Top of the World (ok, hands up to everyone else who knows Howlin' Wolf---from whom Cream developed their version---derived it from Robert Johnson's "Come On In My Kitchen" . . . )

    Rollin' and Tumblin' (a Cream and Canned Heat repertoire staple, and adapted by Jimmy Page for the final edition of the Yardbirds, as "Drinkin' Muddy Water" . . . )

    You Don't Love Me (one of the great one-hit wonders of the blues, Willie Cobb's jewel was first found by Peter Green in John Mayall's A Hard Road Blues Breakers; then, by Stephen Stills and Al Kooper, when Stills filled in for ailing Mike Bloomfield to finish Super Session; and, finally, by the Allman Brothers Band . . . )

    Louisiana Blues (The Muddy Waters classic became a Savoy Brown calling card . . . )

    Two Trains Running (both the Blues Project and the Butterfield Blues Band made this out of a hybrid of Muddy's "Rollin' Stone" and "Still a Fool" . . .)

    Born Under a Bad Sign (the Albert King classic got two treatments, a Latinesque cover by Cream on Wheels of Fire and a brassy take by the Resurrection of Pigboy Crabshaw edition of the Butterfield Blues Band . . . )

    They Call It Stormy Monday (T-Bone Walker's jewel---and let's not forget that without T-Bone Walker there's no B.B. King or almost anyone else playing electric blues guitar---got reimagined by Bobby Blue Bland, from which point just about everyone had it in the song bag, from the Allman Brothers to Mountain---whose arrangement made for a cagey marriage between 'Bone and Muddy Waters, thanks to Leslie West imagining the "Catfish Blues/Rollin' Stone" riff might make a fine bed for their version . . . )

    "Help Me" (Sonny Boy Williamson's charming cop of "Green Onions" probably got beaten to death in those years, too, especially though not exclusively by Ten Years After . . . )

    . . . just to name a few . . .
     
  20. EasyAce

    EasyAce Senior Member

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    You missed the key to Jimmy Page's production techniques---not so much microphone placement but amplifier placement. He placed the amps around the studio room's periphery and got that big, deep sound from there. I'm not entirely sure, but he may have learned the seed of the idea from Mickie Most, of all people, while doing the sessions for Donovan's Hurdy Gurdy Man (on the title track of which Page played one of his most arresting guitar solos ever . . . ) Interestingly, Most took very good care during the Donovan sessions while bum's rushing the final edition of the Yardbirds through the Little Games sessions . . .
     

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