Issue with magenta stain

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by dcomiskey, Nov 19, 2018.

  1. dcomiskey

    dcomiskey Senior Member

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    C89FC1EF-F60A-43E2-B337-7636F57632B9.jpeg C02A8552-7ACF-4BC7-8337-2FB9AA31DC39.jpeg I got a tub of JE Mosers pink aniline dye powder. Regardless if I mix it with denatured alcohol or water, it’s giving me a very odd, green sheen. I can’t seem to find anything about this weird effect. Some people have told me to keep it as-is, as it’s quite unique. But I’m not so sure about this pink lizard stain.
    Any ideas what’s happening and if there’s a way to fix it?
     

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  2. B. Howard

    B. Howard Premium Member

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    I would like to say it is pulling something from the wood but that looks like maple which usually doesn't have much in the way of reactive oils....

    One thought is those black gloves could be contaminating the dye, a reaction with the cheap rubber perhaps?
     
  3. dcomiskey

    dcomiskey Senior Member

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    I don't *think* it's that, as I use different gloves and the same thing happens. If I wipe the area down with alcohol, it gets rid of some of the sheen. But, of course, it also soaks up some of the pink, too.
     
  4. WhiteEpiLP

    WhiteEpiLP Senior Member

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    Didn't ya know green is essential to getting pink. Just ask your wife. ;)
     
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  5. moreles

    moreles Senior Member

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    Jeez, that's strange-looking. Without seeing the stuff in person (and probably even then) it's hard to figure... Could be anything from simply the way the pigment combines, visually, with the pigments in the wood itself to some kind of separation of the different pigments in the dye powder. I'm equally puzzled by the very distinct patchiness of the dyed areas. Sometimes the "off" colors recede as the main color is built up. If you can't get the problem resolved, I'd sand it back and use a different product rather than trying to get a problematic material to work. Sorry for the hassle -- it's such a drag to get to an exciting point in the process -- staining -- and have it go sideways. Good luck.
     
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  6. dcomiskey

    dcomiskey Senior Member

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    A868987D-62B2-4760-8288-963623EA341D.jpeg 66A0A03E-1D63-4A26-952F-3254BDFC47FC.jpeg 74FBBC95-6476-48A1-AD9D-5C466F726384.jpeg D3810F3B-BCF2-496F-A55F-B35A36F3C7C4.jpeg

    I filtered it out with a coffee filter and applied it to a slightly flamed piece of Birdseye maple and also to a scrap piece of quilt. As you can see below, I’m not getting the same reactions from them. There is still some greenish pigment in the flamed parts of the BE, but not the streaking.
    Unfortunately, it looks like this is going to have to be sanded back for a third time. I wiped it down several times with alcohol and it removed a lot of the sheen, but not all of it and it looks terrible. I don’t know what it is with this particular maple, but the headstock laminate and body ARE from the same bullet, so who knows?

    I may have to switch to Trans Tints, although they don’t make pink. Grr. I have an amber one that I may go with in the meantime.
     

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