Is there possibly a PAF in my '64 SG Std?

Discussion in 'Vintage SG' started by knutfin, Feb 20, 2017.

  1. knutfin

    knutfin Junior Member

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    I just got a '64 SG Standard, which is just terrific. The stickers on the pickups are allmost gone, and there are just small pieces left. But when I measured the output, the bridge pu showed 8,6k while the neck was about 7,7k. I haven't got the tools to open it up and check the wiring and holes etc, but does the higher output indicate that it could be a PAF? As far as I know, pat# are consistently 7,5k (+/- 0.25)
     
  2. Kris Ford

    Kris Ford Senior Member

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    For '64, seems highly unlikely. That is the range of the true PATENT#..and 7.5+0.25=7.75..
    The super "consistent" PAT#s were the T TOPS..

    You'd have to see the wire to know for sure..but the wire would tell you 100%. NOT worth damaging an original solder joint to find out.

    But PAT#s are killer pickups in their own right.
     
  3. jamman

    jamman Premium Member

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    HNGD :thumb:
    Anything with Gibson is possible .... Likely ? Not much I'd think , But they still could (possibly) be Early Pat.#'s . :hmm: Pics would be helpful . Most importantly ,,,you like them so what they are makes no big difference ....

    PAF's were not a "hotter" pup, in general. Over an 8K Ohms reading was not the norm ,as I understand ... Low 7K's to mid 7K's was(for PAF's) ... So nope ,i wouldn't think it was a PAF because of an Ohms reading . What is available to see (with out opening the pup), could help to lead to an opinion about your pups.

    7.5K Ohms was the # as an average once all things got more standardized with winding Early Pat.# and later Pat # pups , iirc.


    IIRC the "standard" room temp. used(today) is 68 degrees . It will read higher if your room is ,say 80 degrees....by a few points ....
     
  4. knutfin

    knutfin Junior Member

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    Yeah, that's what I thought. The pickups sounds magnificent, so I won't bother opening them up just to check. You're probably right about the early patent# inconsistency.
     
  5. knutfin

    knutfin Junior Member

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    Thanks!

    I'll post some pictures, so you guys can take a look at it. I'm not a vintage Gibson expert, so I can't figure it out myself. I just got curious by the different numbers.

    I read on the Antique Guitar page that PAFs could range from 7k-9k, so that's where I got it from.

    But yeah, they sound really good so it makes no difference.
     
  6. pete

    pete Senior Member

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    The first pat.#s are exactly the same as the last PAFs with the exception of the sticker. If you have nickel parts, which i assume you do being a 64, you would most likely have early pats. Resistance isn't an indicator either way. I will add that Gruhn currently has a 64 that they advertise as having one paf and one pat, so anything is possible.
     
  7. knutfin

    knutfin Junior Member

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    Yeah, I saw it. I thought they stopped using PAF's in '63. Probably some spare parts they had to use.
     
  8. pete

    pete Senior Member

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    Those pat#s in your SG are likely exactly the same as the PAFs in my '63 335, and how the stickers were distributed is one of the things that interests me about this period at Gibson. Ive been told that the gold plated PAFs lasted well into the late 60s, but Ive never seen one past 65.
     

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