How to Intonate a 63 SG Junior

Discussion in 'Vintage SG' started by yeatzee, Sep 9, 2016.

  1. yeatzee

    yeatzee Senior Member

    Messages:
    188
    Likes Received:
    26
    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2016
    Hey guys as some of you know I got a sweet new guitar recently and it came with the wrong wraparound bridge. I picked up a Philadelphia Luthiers repro of the pre-intonated wraparound bridge with the non-wound G string compensated for. Its got two little allen head screws to adjust the bridge for intonation but before I dig into it I want to hear how this generally should be set up.

    If the string is in tune and I hit the octave note on the 12th fret and its sharp, I should be tightening the allen head screw to move the bridge back right? Since adjusting one side I'd think would alter the other side is it best to incrementally adjust the wound string side's screw a bit than move to the high E side and repeat as necessary until its close or ?

    Any other tips you guys might have would be appreciated. Thanks!

    edit: She's all ready to go, only thing not pictured is gorgomyte, and it turns out the guitar had an aluminum Gotoh tailpiece installed which I am thinking I'll try and install on my 137 if it'll fit and top wrap it.

    [​IMG]

    edit 2: before gorgomyte:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    After gorgomyte. Beautiful Braz board.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Danelectro

    Danelectro V.I.P. Member

    Messages:
    3,575
    Likes Received:
    4,919
    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2007
    Whether its a compensated bridge or a plain 1950's wraparound, I've always setup wraparound bridges by adjusting them for a perfect octave played on the A and B strings. These are the middle strings between the 3-wound and the 3-plain strings, so it gives you a good balanced setting. In the case of a 1950's style plain wraparound, its impossible to get perfect intonation, but setting it up in this manner yields the best compromise between all of the strings.

    You will get the bridge in the ballpark if you adjust it to the dimensions below which are measured from the center of the 22nd fret. If you're not getting a perfect octave between an open note and a note fretted at the 12th fret, here's how you go about adjusting the bridge:

    - If the fretted note is sharp relative to the open note, then the distance from the 12th fret to the saddle is too short. Adjust the bridge away from the neck.

    - If the fretted note is flat relative to the open note, then the distance from the 12th fret to the saddle is too long. Adjust the bridge closer to the neck.

    Hope this helps

    - Dan

    [​IMG]


    An intonated bridge typically ends up with the saddles positioned as shown. The saddles for the wound strings climb closer to the neck as you move from from E to A to D, then the plain G-string steps back, and the B and E strings climb towards the neck at a similar rate of incline:
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Zarg

    Zarg Senior Member

    Messages:
    441
    Likes Received:
    117
    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2016
    in my opionion those frets are very flat which could lead to intonation problems, too
     
  4. yeatzee

    yeatzee Senior Member

    Messages:
    188
    Likes Received:
    26
    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2016
    Dan you are the man! Thank you for all the info, I broke the high E trying to stretch the strings (forgot how thin 9s are!) so I need to go pick up another pack then give your info a shot. I'll post back what I get.

    Yeah I don't expect perfect intonation especially on a wraparound bridge with such archaic adjustments. However with the previous wraparound tailpiece it was almost spot on so I know I can get it close.
     
  5. kakerlak

    kakerlak Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,189
    Likes Received:
    293
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2014
    If you're starting from scratch, it might be easiest to rough in the two E strings since, being closest to the pivot points, changes at each end will have the least effect on the opposite end. If you start with interior strings, then when you adjust one, you'll pull it sharp/flat when you try to adjust the other b/c they'll move a fair bit w/ adjustment at both ends.

    With the E strings close, you can tweak it out to get the best overall intonation across all the strings. Should be able to get pretty close w/ that new bridge -- the only huge intonation problems come from running plain/wound Gs on bridges compensated for the opposite string type.
     

Share This Page