How to Follow the Jam Track for Correct Timing

Discussion in 'Guitar Lessons' started by Roudan, Jul 6, 2017.

  1. Roudan

    Roudan Senior Member

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    Hi Guys

    When you play the solo, do you count the beat or just follow your gut feeling? I heard that normally people don't count the beat and just follow the feeling, like when you are singing. Is it right? Especially when following the jam track, how do you keep the timing correct?

    I have trouble to follow the Jam track. My timing is all over the place. If I count the beat, the playing becomes harder, if I don't count the beat, timing messes up. How do I develop it so I can follow the Jam track?

    This Gary Moore solo lesson is my ALL TIME favorite. And Stuart Bull just nailed everything right. I just love it. Speechless. Stuart Bull can play it at exactly same timing as jam drum track. How amazing it is! I hope I can have same ability as he.

    How do I develop the timing?

    Thanks Guys. I appreciate your experience and comments.

     
  2. kiko

    kiko Senior Member

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    Try counting, tapping your feet to the beat. Just keep on listen to the beat, you get it soon enough.
     
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  3. spitfire

    spitfire Senior Member

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    I rarely count unless there is something unusual. With experience you can clearly hear everything. Though of course there are always some songs or sections of songs that can be tricky.

    If you're just plain having trouble playing in time, then you need to practice more. Simple as that. Also, practice along to a metronome.

    I also agree that tapping your foot or other works well. It is pretty much impossible to tap your foot in time, and play your instrument out of time. And if you can't even tap your foot in time, then of course you need to work on that as well.
     
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  4. Sct13

    Sct13 Gold Supporter Premium Member

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    I just noodle ....no timing...I make mistakes and learn from them....(sometimes)

    Here are a few examples, I just recorded these last Sunday....Practice ...Practice ....Practice....its OK to get discouraged....put it down and come back later...

    I do play from my gut to a fault sometimes...

    Also! You will almost NEVER play it like the original artist, that will frustrate you WAY more....you have to let loose and learn the fret board like an extension of yourself....Then can you start to emulate your hero's



     
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  5. Roudan

    Roudan Senior Member

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    Thanks Sct13. Great playing. I enjoyed it. In the 2nd video, you showed Joe Banamassa DVD. what is it? Is it a lesson DVD of Joe Banamassa? Thx
     
  6. Sct13

    Sct13 Gold Supporter Premium Member

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    Thnax ,,,I hope you are able to lean from it!!

    That wasn't a Joe Bonamassa DVD that is the box that contained the pickups from Seymour Duncan that I was demoing ...I'm a pick up junkie ....that is #27 of how many they made ....1000 I think....could be wrong ...I dunno

    They are aged and signed too!
     
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  7. JonR

    JonR Senior Member

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    You shouldn't need to count to feel your way through each bar. You should know where beats 1-2-3-4 are, without counting them as such. It really wont help to count beats, IMO! (Surely you can clap your hands 4 times without needing to count it? ;))

    But it can be harder to feel longer units of time, such as numbers of bars before a chord change, or how many bars in a verse. So if missing chord changes is a problem, then counting is definitely advised there, until - like everything else you practice for long enough - it becomes subconscious and you can feel when the changes are coming.

    One tip I've found useful is to break everything into twos. Just as each 4/4 bar is felt as two pairs of down and up beats, bars themselves fall into pairs (riffs and phrases, lines of a verse or chorus), and then into fours (longer types of line, or pairs of lines), and then into eights (whole verse, or half a verse), etc. So you should (eventually) be able to feel the music swinging from one half of the pattern to the next half, from the "call" to the "response". ("Call" and "response" can work on all formal levels, from beat to beat, right up to verse and chorus.)

    Keeping steady time is another issue. IOW, even if you can count and/or feel your way through a structure well enough, you may still have trouble getting ahead of the beat, speeding up or slowing down. That's where metronome practice comes in, to train yourself to stay steady, in the groove.
    Tapping your foot won't help, unless your time is already pretty good. Your foot is controlled by the same brain that has trouble controlling the timing of your hands, right? ;) Plus,if you have to think about tapping your foot, that's just one more thing to think about.
    If you feel like you want to tap your foot, that's OK - don't stop yourself, because you need to express your sense of rhythm bodily, you shouldn't inhibit it. Move to the groove. But don't rely on the foot to keep you steady.
    Where I find foot tapping helps is when playing syncopated passages off the beat. Tapping to mark the beat makes it easier to get the off-beats in the right place.
    The metronome is really the best way to train your sense of time. It will certainly prove to you how good or bad your sense of time currently is. (In case you think foot-tapping has fixed it...)
     
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  8. Roudan

    Roudan Senior Member

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    Thanks Jon. That is very good . I will practice as you suggested. I appreciate your help.
     
  9. notme

    notme Senior Member

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    What helped me was to play a few notes instead of the whole solo/rhythm and work my way up. I listen to the backing track a few times carefully, then play to it hitting a fraction of the notes needed. This gets the timing into my head and I can work my way up. Its more time consuming but gets me there.
     
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  10. Aliasthump

    Aliasthump Junior Member

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    Hello Routan,

    You're getting a lot of advice, some of it is good.

    The answer is, yes you have to count. If you are a beginner, yes. You have to know where 1 is, at any given time. That's what syncs you to everyone else in a jam.

    With practice, as you start to know what it "feels" like (4/4 - 3/4 - 7/8 or what ever you do), the need to actually count (1,2,3,4) won't be required. This is were "feeling it" exist. Those who "feel it" are past counting it. Sure there are those who can feel it and not count, as in dancing, and if you can do that, then you have a head start. But you still need to know where 1 (or the beginning of a measure) is at any given time. When it becomes natural to feel it, you will become accustomed to the feel of a measure count as well. You'll know what it feels like to know when a change is needed. 4, 8 or 16 measures as an example - usually on an even count in 4/4.

    If you don't have natural timing, I suggest focusing on the metronome. Don't put your guitar on. Just play like a drummer with your hands. Count out loud and hit hard (accent) on the 1 every time. Then subdivide the beats into halfs, quarters, eights, etc. and make sure it fits in between the two beats

    When you're anywhere that has music, play the drums with your hands or fingers on your lap, the table top or anything you can tap on. Do this all the time. Hear the drum count and try to make drum fills by taking any two beats and subdivide it. You can actually play your own beat against the drummers beat as long as you are in time and know where 1 is at.

    In time, you will get a natural feeling for the groove and that will translate seamlessly to your guitar playing.

    In music, it's all about the timing (the beat), the notes are just the coloring, the icing on the cake. Everyone has to be on time, but they don't have to be playing the same notes, as long as you are in the same key.

    The only other thing is knowing your neck, but that's another discussion altogether.

    Good luck and practice, practice, practice.
     

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