How Do You Tell Your Guitar Teacher You Dislike What He's Teaching You?

Discussion in 'Guitar Lessons' started by HearHear, May 9, 2017.

  1. Assault Bacon

    Assault Bacon Senior Member

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    The blues may not be everyone's cup of tea... but there's no arguing that it is bedrock for much of the music we play. Classical as well, if you think about it.

    Like shredding? Turn down the volume - it's essentially classical guitar. That may or may not mean anything to you.

    The short answer is this: sit down with your instructor and tell him, "I appreciate your efforts, but this is not my focus; this is not my passion." Let him know what you want to learn. If he's neither willing nor able to shift gears, be nice about it and find someone else.

    I can nearly guarantee that when you want to expand your horizons, though, you'll come back to blues basics and learn the techniques. Good luck.
     
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  2. HumanJHawkins

    HumanJHawkins Member

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    There is so much over-thinking going on here... Just tell him what you need and what you don't need. No same person is going to be offended because you have different tastes. And keep guiding him on what you need as long as you have patience for it and as long as he is receptive and getting closer to what works for you. If things improve fast enough, you're good. If he can't teach other styles or it just doesn't work out, then you'll have to find a new teacher. Good luck!
     
  3. bugo

    bugo Junior Member

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    I disagree. I think you should learn what influences you. Everyone has influences. If you think he should learn the influences of his influences, why not learn those artists' influences? How far do you have to go back?
     
  4. GitFiddle

    GitFiddle Premium Member

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    Grade school student raising hand to his teacher, "Yes ma'am, I would prefer to only learn how to add even numbers. I don't care for odd numbers".
     
  5. HearHear

    HearHear Senior Member

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    Well guys, I'll dive back into this thread again and just say- thanks for all the good advice.

    However, my teacher is leaving town for good in August. So, in a few weeks, I'll have a new teacher. The local music establishment where I take lessons is going to let me "test drive" two or three new teachers. So here are my choices:

    1. An older man who plays the stuff I want to play, he's a bit older than me, but rumor is he's very, very strict. I'm not sure I want that at my age. (He also teaches drums and bass along with guitar. Not sure if this is a plus or minus).

    2. Second teacher is a complete unknown, he's a younger gentleman they have't officially hired yet and I don't know anything about him. I'm guessing I'll try him first if he gets hired by August.

    3. Third teacher is female. She appears to be in her early 20's at most, I'm old enough to be her father. Not that it matters, but it must be said she is very good looking as well. I think I'll pass on her without even trying for various reasons ;)

    So here I am. Only a few more lessons with my current teacher, I'll miss him a lot when he leaves. He was very patient and fun to work with.

    Thanks again for all the great advice!!
     
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  6. Seegs

    Seegs Junior Member

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    I think you were lucky to have the teacher you did for the time you did...

    Like it or not Blues is the foundation of most of the styles of western music...get a handle on it and it will make you a better player in many other styles...

    I've studied jazz and classical music with private teachers for many years...and guess what they did...made me a better Jazz and classical guitarist...

    Got back into the blues and have stayed there for most of my 52 years on the instrument...on our last gig we played...Blues...funk...jazz...acoustic ballads and rock...

    I teach and I interview my students at length before I take them on...my lessons will use blues as the foundation and cornerstone of our instruction...the techniques used in Blues crossover into other styles...classical and jazz not nearly as much although I use a lot of drop 2 voicings in Blues and funk...if you're ok with that I'll take you on if not you're free to go elsewhere...
     
  7. clutchcargo

    clutchcargo Bionic Member Premium Member

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    I would be honest and respectful. Teaching is an art in itself. Everyone can't do it. I don't care if you're Eddy VanHalen.
    It takes patience and understanding of your students goals and aspirations. Along with being a people person and understanding personalities.
    Not to mention, the ability to have students learn things that they may not have thought they needed. Just to better their knowledge or technique. Those are the kinds of teachers that stand out in my book. Whatever the subject matter.
     
  8. Bownse

    Bownse Senior Member

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    That's what I was when I walked in his door. His approach has been that (along with feeding my blues jones) while throwing in theory, reading sheet music, etc.
     
  9. vintageguitarz

    vintageguitarz Member

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    Unless you're planning on only playing Flamenco or Peter, Paul and Mary because you have no interest in Rock, Fusion, Jazz, Pop, Hip-hop, R and B, Country Rock, Punk or any modern music styles, then you better lower yourself to learn Blues because all of the aforementioned are based on Blues scales and techniques.

    Otherwise, just give him a rubber check in payment and you should get a How to play guitar like The Monkey's Play Book.
     
  10. Malikon

    Malikon アストロモンスター V.I.P. Member

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    "Otherwise, just give him a rubber check in payment and you should get a How to play guitar like The Monkey's Play Book."

    Can I get the Tab for, "I'm a Believer"?

    :D
     
  11. orfeo1

    orfeo1 Junior Member

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    HearHear, My thoughts:
    1. You must enjoy playing or you will never get anywhere. With that said. . . What you will enjoy the most and find the most gratifying is that which you strugglingly aspire to, and then finally overcome. The formula is P + O = H. "P" is pain (the struggle), "O" is overcoming the painful yearning hungry struggle, and "H" is happy. H is always made up of both P & O. P is just pain if you don't have O, and O is not very meaningful or satisfying without P. In other words, happiness is almost always the resolution of some amount of suffering.

    2. As far as your teacher is concerned, he is showing you how to use tools and add them to your box. If he teaches you to use a chisel and carve out the form of a bird, it doesn't matter if you like birds. . . only that you learn the use of the chisel. If he feels that a bird sculpture is the most direct way for him to convey his perception of how to use a chisel, then maybe it is best to submit (for now). Your teacher has a certain responsibility to inject a bit of discipline into your practice. Make you go somewhere you might not have bothered to otherwise. If you want to play what your friends play, ask them to teach you too, like "Hey man, how'd you just do that? Show me." You have to explore your own waters, and then ask for help from your teacher and friends when you run into obstacles. If you want to learn certain songs or styles, try to play them on your own first and then turn to your teacher & friends for help. That's how you develop your "P" and start on your "O". Then you get some help with your "O" and suddenly you're in the land of "H".

    3. I have found that different players always have something to offer my understanding regardless of their level of ability, their style, or their amount of experience. Learn from everybody. This goes for players in general and it also goes for teachers too. My experience is that I learned and absorbed much more through various teachers over a given time period than I would have with a single teacher over the same period. If I were you, I'd try the attractive girl teacher (I know, I'm a bit of a cad) just for the novelty & fun of it, then after a couple lessons switch to the unknown new guy if he's still there, but finally I'd definitely zero-in on the older serious guy for some longer-term work when I'm ready to really sink my teeth in.
     
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  12. C_Becker

    C_Becker Dat Gibson smell Premium Member

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    That intro riff is really a great exercise :headbanger:
     
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  13. Malikon

    Malikon アストロモンスター V.I.P. Member

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    yup, then you step it up with Tornado of Souls intro,..and move to Malpractice intro (Testament.)

    It's like Beg: Metallica, Int: Megadeth, Adv: Testament. :dude:

    Exercises should be fun. And more importantly they should sound like music and not exercises. (imo) Organic and not...well...exercises. :laugh2:
     
  14. Jymbopalyse

    Jymbopalyse Senior Member

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    I assume your instructor's name is Steve:

    You - Hi Steve.
    Steve - Hi.
    You - Hey Steve, I'm really not interested in what your are teaching me right now.



    Now if your instructor isn't named Steve, I'm all out of ideas.
     
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  15. frankv

    frankv What Are You Waiting For? Premium Member V.I.P. Member

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    Fantastic first post. Bravo dude.
     
  16. bugo

    bugo Junior Member

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    If the OP doesn't want to learn the blues, then I don't see why he should. I never learned how to play the blues and it hasn't affected my rock playing at all. When I first started playing I learned the songs that interested me and I developed my style partially based on that music. Soon I started coming up with stuff on my own and now when I play, I almost exclusively play stuff I made up or just improvise. I never took a lesson in my life. Instead I learned how to read tabs and learned how to play parts of some of my favorite songs and went with it. I occasionally read magazine articles and got some ideas from them. I also learned by reading interviews with some of my favorite guitarists. Friends who played guitar also showed me some things to do. I started playing at the same time as a buddy and he moved away for about 6 months and when he came back he had learned a lot and gotten a lot better. He showed me some very basic music theory and I went with it. Lessons wouldn't have worked for me. I don't think I'd be a better rock guitarist if I had learned the blues first. I keep seeing mentions that "rock is based on the blues so you should learn the blues" but if you're going to say that, why not learn the music the blues is based on? Or the music that music was based on? Learn what you want to learn and develop your own unique style. Developing your own style is much more important IMO than learning certain existing styles of music or even learning theory. Be yourself because nobody else on the planet plays exactly like you do.
     
  17. lemmy loud

    lemmy loud Senior Member

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    You need to maintain interest. I took lessons in '76 and my teacher was a spectacularly talented jazz
    musician. I had never picked up a guitar before except to bring it home. Out of the gate, he started showing
    me all these jazz chords that you needed chimp fingers to bend to, and theory that was like Miss Crabtrees
    algebra class. Ponderous. I just wanted to learn Jumping Jack Flash. That only lasted a short time and was
    a waste of his time and mine. Definitely ask to learn stuff that will keep you motivated cuz practicing will get
    tedious occasionally. And, for all those people saying stay with the blues, its a different world for younger
    people. Their music doesn't have the foundations ours did. I can see not wanting to spend too much time on it.
    Life is too short to not spend it doing the stuff you like.
    :cheers2:
     

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