How Did I Get Here?

Discussion in 'Norlin Years' started by Burny FLG, Dec 15, 2017.

  1. Burny FLG

    Burny FLG Senior Member

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    Playing a Gibson. Put this here because I have an 83 LPC - could go anywhere though. I never really played in a band just wrote songs on a Martin in my livingroom for 20 years. Started doing open mikes and as the Martin doesn't have a pickup was miked up and it was getting marked here and there and I couldn't get the volume and dynamics with fingers and that set up. So went electric guitar and 12w amp for practical reasons with a plectrum none of which I've used before so big learning curve but it's great I'm loving it this is the way of the future for me. A Gibson with humperdinkers is a serious instrument though and will take some getting acquainted with.
     
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  2. Jeremiah

    Jeremiah The Worst Premium Member

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    Welcome, any chance of some pics o’that badboy?
     
  3. scrumm21

    scrumm21 Silver Supporter

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    .......Fate

    yes - pics please
     
  4. HardCore Troubadour

    HardCore Troubadour Senior Member

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    welcome aboard.
     
  5. Thumpalumpacus

    Thumpalumpacus Senior Member

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  6. Stinky Kitty

    Stinky Kitty Senior Member

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  7. Burny FLG

    Burny FLG Senior Member

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    Hey it's not all about me. What's your story?
     
  8. Burny FLG

    Burny FLG Senior Member

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  9. Progrocker111

    Progrocker111 Senior Member

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    Nice one. Interesting that its a early 83 still with maple neck. Most had switched back to mahogany ones at that time, even earlier in late 82.
     
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  10. Burny FLG

    Burny FLG Senior Member

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    You know how it is you leave left overs in the freezer then you decide to make a casserole. On another topic - bought from a trader who from a jazz guitarist. Jazz guy bought it new and was his second guitar. Hasn't had much use really or well looked after. Heaviest guitar I've ever played can't believe its weight relieved must weigh 14 lbs.
     
  11. Jeremiah

    Jeremiah The Worst Premium Member

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    14? Holy chit
     
  12. HardCore Troubadour

    HardCore Troubadour Senior Member

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    Lol.... let’s remember that “must be” .... but I have see. A couple of 13’s...
     
  13. Progrocker111

    Progrocker111 Senior Member

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    Early 80s are generally the heaviest years.
     
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  14. jojo

    jojo Senior Member

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    Super nice Les Paul !!!!
     
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  15. Stinky Kitty

    Stinky Kitty Senior Member

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    Sweet guitar and amp, thank you!
     
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  16. bungle

    bungle Premium Member

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    Beauty guitars!
     
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  17. Burny FLG

    Burny FLG Senior Member

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    I like your quote about technique and style. It works the other way too. Personally if I could play technically proficiently I wouldn't care about style. Well.
     
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  18. Stinky Kitty

    Stinky Kitty Senior Member

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    Thanks. I firmly advocate both, and if it's a chicken egg thing, then for me, style shows the way, and technique builds on it. One really must push oneself to keep growing, and building technique is a vital part of that. However it can be a trap as well.. when it acts more as a container we never break loose from. Like a set of chops that we comfortably fall back on because that is what we've built in during technical practice. You know.. our comfort zone.

    Again, this is what works for me, others have their ways, and more power to them, I don't impose what works for me onto others, nor judge them for following their inner needs. For me, Style is something that emerges over time, and allows me to break out of rote mechanical methods, and at best, cross into poetics. Knowing scales and modes and chords and theory and dynamics and rhythm and tone are all essential - the more the better..

    But when does a scale become an expressive phrase that carries what it takes to incite an emotion or move a listener?

    I can't take credit for the saying though, it's from a 2000 film by John Waters, named Cecil B. Demented*. It was inspiration for me to remember to be more spontaneous, irreverent, transgressive, and have an open sense of play. When it works best, I may discover something new that is then built into my technical method discipline (practice).

    A non musical example from my past is a series of photographic workshops I once lead. It was called, Subvert Your Expectations. After approaching a photographic subject in every way possible, one winds up with a contact sheet with no surprises. So, after shooting all of the previsualized angles, go back and maybe stop looking through the view finder, or stand on your head, or do whatever it takes to break out of the rigid confines of impeccable technique and get messy. Photographers tend to be a fastidious lot, so getting them to loosen up was the point.

    Toss out technique and take risks. Be spontaneous. Lead from style (how you do things), not technique (the way you've done it all along). For me, it's about leaving the comfortable territory that I have built into muscle memory and skate out onto thin ice where I've never been before. If I make a mistake, or get lucky and hit a new riff, repeat it like that's what I meant to do all along. Then try to remember it later in the woodshed, and build on it.

    I'm sure others have different points of view. This is highly personal to me, and it may not be suitable for others.
    hth


    *Highly recommend Cecil B. Demented and another by Waters named Pecker.
     

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