Have the equipment (I think) so where

Discussion in 'Recording Studio' started by Woodekm, Apr 30, 2017.

  1. Woodekm

    Woodekm Senior Member

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    OK.....Have the equipment (I think) so where to begin.

    To start, I have many guitars (LPs Mostly, and a variety of others) and a Viola Bass, which I frequently take turns playing. Also have a set of Alesis electric drums which I've played for years. I just want to goof around and get some of the music that's been in my brain - out! Recording my humming into a phone voice recorder - ain't gonna get it! :)


    Sooooo. I never really intended recording untill I recently bought some used equipment from a friend that had intentions of recording - but obviously never got around to it. Or it was too involved. He ended up selling me a Yamaha AG03 3-Channel Mixer/Interface and a Tascam DR-40 Field Recorder. This kind of got me thinking "possibly " attempting recording my different instruments individually (singing may be on the back burner here!).

    Not afraid to drop a little money into the software I'll need to purchase, and have a nice Macbook Pro 17" I've had for a few years.


    Any suggestions as to what I may be able to do - as a beginner - with the equipment I have? The instruments, I get.... It's just being able to connect, and utilize the electronics I recently purchased and just tinker around. I'll figure out how to use the software - once a suggestion is given, but really have no clue what or how to use the electronics I purchased (fairly cheap). Garage band? Protools? I don't mind starting easy/cheap just to get my feet wet, but this is something I just want to play around with. Not planning on becoming a Rock star! Although that would be cool! For all I know, I may end up selling it too!

    Anything anyone could suggest would be great!

    I just couldn't pass up buying that equipment. Sooooo, on to learn and tinker!

    Thanks!
     
  2. Steinmetzify

    Steinmetzify Senior Member

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    You should be able to record anything you have with what you have already.

    I'd suggest Reaper. It's deep but easy to use once you get going. Plug something in, load up Reaper, hit record. There's a free demo, but it's not limited in any way and it actually doesn't stop working if you don't pay. Reaper costs $60.

    You didn't mention amps or mics, so I'm going to assume you're going to need amp sims. Can recommend some things or people will be along shortly to do so.

    You chain is going to look like this:

    Guitar>interface>computer>Reaper>amp simulation>done

    Your interface allows you to get the guitar signal into your computer for recording, then the amp sims utilize tech to make it sound like you want it to. Marshalls, Mesas, Orange, Engl, etc. possibilities are basically limitless. Same for drums and bass.

    Any specific questions post here and people will be able to answer.

    Maybe take a look here for some ideas about amp sims etc...

    http://www.mylespaul.com/forums/threads/the-definitive-modeling-thread-faqs.359019/
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2017
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  3. Woodekm

    Woodekm Senior Member

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    Thanks! I will go the Reaper route as it sounds like the easiest to get going on.(And cheap so it's not too bad if somthing else appeals ).

    Sorry for not mentioning it, but I am running my guitars through a Marshall DSL5C 5 watt tube amp. I also have a pedal board with most every pedal I would need (chorus, fuzz, phase 90, carbon copy, reverb, multiple distortion pedals etc ).

    The Tascam field recorder has 2 mics but I ordered a Sure SM57 and cable last weekend - to be here soon.

    I'm wondering if the Yamaha AG03 will even be needed if I use Reaper? What instance might I need it? It's a portable 3 channel mixer interface with 1 mic input.

    Thanks again!
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2017
  4. Steinmetzify

    Steinmetzify Senior Member

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    Two different ways of accomplishing the same thing, man.

    For direct guitar recordings, I'd go with the 57 into the Yamaha though....that's basically what that whole setup is for. Guitar>amp>pedals>mic>interface>Reaper.

    I usually leave at least one amp mic'd up for recording...use sims most of the time but it's always nice to mic an amp, nothing sounds or feels the same.

    For drums or whatever else you could use the field recorder just for wav files to import into Reaper to work with.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2017
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  5. Dick Banks

    Dick Banks Senior Member

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    ...agree with all, and then just start recording EVERYTHING. Get used to what sounds good, and what sounds terrible. When I started with Ableton, I just recorded my practice sessions, just garbage really, but it got me used to using the equipment, the latency issues, mixing tracks, etc.
     
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  6. Woodekm

    Woodekm Senior Member

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    Thanks! So is the Tascam DR-40 Field Recorder just for when I go over my friends house to record where my drums are and bring back to my Mac (with the Reaper loaded) is?

    What things would I use the Tascam for just around my house - if the other things I have seem to do the job?

    Thanks again!
     
  7. Steinmetzify

    Steinmetzify Senior Member

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    Dude it's all gonna be personal preference. If you record with it and like it, you could use it for whatever you want to; the mic>interface setup is just going to be more versatile especially in your DAW is all.

    For me, I might use the Tascam for something like raw vocals just to catch the sound, but other than that not much. The interface is going to have better converters.
     
  8. Woodekm

    Woodekm Senior Member

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    Cool! Gotta' lotta' playing around to do. You never know till you get into it (like anything else).

    Thanks again!
     
  9. Nard

    Nard Senior Member

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    I posted a similar comment a week or so ago. In that time I've done a lot of playing with stuff I've recorded and I'm surprised at how quick you can pick things up. The DAW I'm using is very basic so I'm looking to switch to Reaper soon as it seems to get the thumbs up from a lot of people here. Enjoy making the music. You may be surprised by how good you can sound.
     
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  10. Woodekm

    Woodekm Senior Member

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    Thanks! I just wish I was younger! I used to eat up computer programs (or what they called computer programs in the early to mid 90's!). Wouldn't bat an eye to work on tweaking a program - for days drawing diagrams, taking notes etc. You actually had to do WAaay more tweaking/work to get anything to run or work the way you wanted it to. Now everything seem much more user friendly, but Im finding the older I get the lazier I tend to get! So maybe its a push!

    Thanks for the comments!
     
  11. DarrellV

    DarrellV Likes > Posts Silver Supporter Premium Member

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    Good to hear you've got the ball rolling! That's great! Enjoyment is key. If your struggling with the tech, your likely not having fun!

    I think what a lot of people forget is that what looks complicated at first are really just the features that make it so versatile once you get the hang of it.
     

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