Has anyone ever tried putting a guitar in a tanning booth...

Discussion in 'The Custom Shop' started by hecube, Jan 12, 2019.

  1. hecube

    hecube Senior Member

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    for long sessions in order to have the finish fade faster?
     
  2. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member

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    Yes, but the girls in bikinis waiting for the tanning bed were not impressed with my craftsmanship, for some reason.

    I got better results from a day of bright Colorado sun at 7,000' than I did a few hours in that UV bed.
     
  3. judson

    judson Senior Member

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    so the girls were with you in bikinis in the bright Colorado sun at 7,000' as well ?

    and you got "better reults" as they were impressed with your "craftmanship" ?

    you dog you :naughty:

    must have been the brighter light....:photos:and deets required
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2019
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  4. hecube

    hecube Senior Member

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    I think the lack of oxygen got to him first.
     
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  5. cooljuk

    cooljuk Transducer Producer Premium Member

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    A had a gym membership that included a promotional membership to a tanning place across from it. Since I have no interest in cancer or changing my skin color for any reason, there was really only one logical use for it, considering I had recently started doing finishing work.

    I didn't notice that the tan lines under the pick guard and hardware changed, at all. I don't know if it wasn't bright enough or wasn't in the bed long enough. It just seemed to have zero change. I use the Behlen UV reactive (non-piano) nitro.

    Setting a guitar out on the porch for a few days seemed more effective. That eventually darkened things up a little but, in the end, I just decided that shooting an already amber clear on top gave more consistent and controllable results and will eventually still lead the same life of color change. I just start it off with a few years on it.
     
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  6. ARandall

    ARandall Senior Member

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    Fade is an interesting one. Nothing is wholly resistant, but the more fade proof will not fade like the old dyes.....at all!!
    The reactive dyes really do fade quickly.......like 30 mins will make a difference in the right light. The fade resistant is like looking at sun-bleached plastic......its an anemic result and often quite blotchy.
    People have stuck guitars out in the sun all summer to get the same level of change as what 20 mins will do for the UV intolerant dye.......is that truly worth the effort??
    Plus the old guitars and clones also have the clear ambering up a lot......which is what really gives the old guitars their character. Fading with no ambered clear looks flat by comparison.
     
  7. Neffco

    Neffco Senior Member

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    You need to take them out skiing. The uv rays reflect off the snow, plus when you take it in the lodge by the fire....instant checking . 73895DE1-BDB3-48F0-97D2-09C24FCAF0F4.jpeg
     

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