Guitar Works - Country Rock Ballad Solo in D - Aeolian Mode - B C# D E F# G A

Discussion in 'Guitar Lessons' started by cefobe, Jul 1, 2017.

  1. cefobe

    cefobe Senior Member

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    Marcus Nalgaber - Guitar Works - Country Rock Ballad Solo in D - Aeolian Mode - B C# D E F# G A



    :cheers:
     
  2. huw

    huw V.I.P. Member

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    Two sharps?

    That's D major, not D aeolean. Did you mean B aeolean?
     
  3. JonR

    JonR Senior Member

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    Yep, sounds like solid D major to me. Nothing aeolian going on: no B aeolian, and definitely no D aeolian.
     
  4. cefobe

    cefobe Senior Member

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    I am playing with 2 sharps in the tone of D, but of the 7 scales that has the Tone of D,
    using basically the 6th scale (mode).
     
  5. huw

    huw V.I.P. Member

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    I think there may be a language problem here, because that makes no sense at all. Sorry, but I can't work out what you're trying to say. :(
     
  6. cefobe

    cefobe Senior Member

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    No problem, best regards :cheers2:
     
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  7. JonR

    JonR Senior Member

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    This may well be a language problem, as huw says, but issues of terminology - even among English speakers! - are the source of most of the confusion about modes.

    "B aeolian mode" means the D major scale played so that B sounds like the keynote. (What you call the "tone" is what we all "tonic" or keynote.)
    IOW, it's a "B minor" sound.
    What you're playing sounds like D major, because D sounds like the overall keynote (coming from the backing at least). You may be accenting a B note in your lead lines, or using a pattern in which B is lowest, but it's simply accenting the 6th note of the key. That's not a modal effect. The chords are governing the modal sound, which is D ionian in this case.

    IOW, if you play B aeolian over a D major sequence, what it sounds like is - a D major sequence (with maybe an accent on the 6th). That may be a nice sound, but there is nothing "aeolian" about it.

    If the intention is to demonstrate B aeolian mode, you need a Bm chord to be central to the backing, confirming B as tonic (keynote). Then any pattern of D major that you play over it will sound like B aeolian mode.

    Apologies if you understand this distinction, but a lot of folks don't! ;)
     
  8. cefobe

    cefobe Senior Member

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    Many thanks JonR for your interest, I understand, that´s OK. :cheers:
     

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