Guitar Grounding Common Misconceptions?

Discussion in 'Tonefreaks' started by jonesy, Jul 23, 2010.

  1. onehippie

    onehippie Senior Member

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    i have a feeling these pics are going to be helpful thanks fellas:thumb:
     
  2. b3john

    b3john Senior Member

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    And "noiseless" singlecoils attempt to mimic the noise canceling function of a humbucker, but in the space of a singlecoil pup (which come in various sizes: Strat, Tele bridge, Tele neck, P-90, etc.).
     
  3. jonesy

    jonesy GLOBAL WIRING GURU MLP Vendor

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    Yeah I think a lot of the "noiseless" single coils and Fender SCN's are really just stacked humbuckers. I have a variety of un-potted Humbuckers and vintage style single coil pu's in my guitars and they all are really very quiet. The one that gives me the most Buzz/Humm is the P-90 in my LP Jr. Clone. It' properly grounded, and sounds really good, but add a little gain on the amp and it just gives off the more noise than my other pu's. After all P-90's are just big single coils and this one is wound just over 8K.
     
  4. jonesy

    jonesy GLOBAL WIRING GURU MLP Vendor

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    Yeah I think a lot of the "noiseless" single coils and Fender SCN's are really just stacked humbuckers. I have a variety of un-potted Humbuckers and vintage style single coil pu's in my guitars and they all are really very quiet. The one that gives me the most Buzz/Humm is the P-90 in my LP Jr. Clone. It' properly grounded, and sounds really good, but add a little gain on the amp and it just gives off more noise than any of my other pu's. After all P-90's are just big single coils and this one is wound just over 8K.
     
  5. MrRhoads

    MrRhoads Senior Member

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    Here we go:)
    Original soldering joint from the factory in Japan 1987 :D
    Let me know if you need any other Strat pic´s :thumb:
     

    Attached Files:

  6. jonesy

    jonesy GLOBAL WIRING GURU MLP Vendor

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    Thanks for the pics :thumb:

    [​IMG]
     
  7. onehippie

    onehippie Senior Member

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    gotta remember to solder that.
    Jonesy would i use a 40w to heat the claw?
    would the springs and screws interfere with heating?
     
  8. jonesy

    jonesy GLOBAL WIRING GURU MLP Vendor

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    Yeah you are gonna need to throw some heat on that trem claw to get a good solder connection. 40 watts should work just fine, you should be able to solder it with or without the springs on there.

    You might want to take some rough 100-150 grit sandpaper and clean that spot off on the trem where the wires goes if there is any oxidation on the metal that way the solder will stick better. I don't sand the back of the pots but on that trem claw it might help out.
     
  9. onehippie

    onehippie Senior Member

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    thanks bro just the info i will be needing as always:)
     
  10. Mookakian

    Mookakian Senior Member

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    Is there a reason for not sanding the pot a little?
     
  11. jonesy

    jonesy GLOBAL WIRING GURU MLP Vendor

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    Yeah normally new pots have a coating on them that helps the solder stick so if you sand it off it doesn't really help you with soldering.

    If you have an old pot that has a lot of oxidation on the back sanding it may help, but as a general rule I do not sand the back of pots.
     
  12. lukemacauley

    lukemacauley Mac Guitars Premium Member

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    I've actually found the exact opposite Jonesy. I always use a 25W soldering iron, and when I got the new CTS 'True Vintage Taper' pots in, they were brand new and very shiny. However, the solder just wouldn't stick without me sanding the pots.

    So, I always give pots a light sand, as in theory it gives the pot a greater surface area for the solder to stick to.

    Are you using a 40W iron for soldering to the back of pots?
     
  13. MrRhoads

    MrRhoads Senior Member

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    If the soldering iron is hot enough you don´t have to sand for a great solder joint ;)
     
  14. jonesy

    jonesy GLOBAL WIRING GURU MLP Vendor

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    Luke I have used 25 watt iron with a chisel tip to solder to the back of the pots but a 40 watt iron works so much easier and really gives a good tight solder joint in a lot less time.

    Billy from RS has also repeatedly said that sanding the back of new pots is not necessary, and I don't think you see him doing that in any of his videos.

    If you get a chance try a 40 watt iron for the soldering to the backs of the pots and see how that works out for you. I also find that the 40 watt works great for soldering to that big ground lug on the toggle switches as well. You can still use your 25 watt for soldering to the pu lugs and other assembly work.
     
  15. lukemacauley

    lukemacauley Mac Guitars Premium Member

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    Okay Mr. Pretentious, that's why I asked if Jonesy used a 40W iron for soldering to the back of pots.

    And now you're going to tell me that microscopic bits of metal get into the pot and wreck the taper if you sand the back of the pots. Jog on. :rolleyes:
     
  16. lukemacauley

    lukemacauley Mac Guitars Premium Member

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    When I'm back in Scotland I'll be sure to buy one and try it out. Thanks mate. :thumb:
     
  17. MrRhoads

    MrRhoads Senior Member

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    Honestly, i just wanted to point out that some good heat is enough :)
    If you sand the back of your pots in your rigs and they work fine then that´s just another way of doing it.
    Whatever works for you.
     
  18. lukemacauley

    lukemacauley Mac Guitars Premium Member

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    Ah, sorry for jumping on you then like that.

    It would look better if I didn't have to sand them, so I'll be looking into the 40W iron.
     
  19. jonesy

    jonesy GLOBAL WIRING GURU MLP Vendor

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    Your welcome Luke. Right now I have a 25w Weller and a 40 watt Weller I keep on the bench and use them as needed depending on what I am doing.

    A couple months back I bought a Weller soldering station that is adjustable from 5-40 watts but I have been saving it and it's still new in the box. You might want to look for something like that. You can turn it up to 40 watts when you are soldering to the back of the pots and dial it down to 25 watts for other work. And if you are working on a PCB you can go as low as needed so you wont burn anything up. Just thought I'd mention it.

    This is the one I have it was only $42.00 usd, they make some high dollar versions depends what you want to spend.


    Weller WLC100 40 Watts Soldering Station for Hobbyist and Do-It-Yourselfers | ToolBarn.com
     
  20. jonesy

    jonesy GLOBAL WIRING GURU MLP Vendor

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    The black wire soldered to the volume pot that you see coiled up would run through the body, into the trem cavity and then get soldered to the trem claw.

    [​IMG]

    Just wanted to be clear on how the grounding on a Strat works so I traced the ground path in green. You can see the black wire that comes into the trem cavity and is soldered to the trem claw. The other end of that wire is soldered onto the back of the volume pot and all the pots are grounded together by a wire.

    [​IMG]

    The springs carry the ground to the trem block, the bridge sits on top of the trem block and is screwed to it, then the strings feed through the back of the trem block and run over the bridge saddles. This is how your strings and bridge are grounded back to the wiring controls on a Strat.



     

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