Gibson Les Paul Std 2018 Fretboard Fissures

Discussion in 'Gibson Les Pauls' started by Selendia, Nov 25, 2018.

  1. Side Burns

    Side Burns Senior Member

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    Every time my OCD kicks in i look at the Peter Frampton Phoenix
    [​IMG]
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  2. frozenotter

    frozenotter Dumbed-Down Premium Member

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    Wow, not one anal fissure joke. :hmm:
     
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  3. kakerlak

    kakerlak Senior Member

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    I love how genuinely happy he looks in that picture.
     
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  4. JeffH66

    JeffH66 Pelham Blue Addict Premium Member

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    He is so thrilled to have that Custom back it's not even funny. I'm really happy for him too. It's one of the great rock stories.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2018
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  5. Selendia

    Selendia Junior Member

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    No, the strings on the pictures are still the stock ones. (.009 - .046)
     
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  6. Frogfur

    Frogfur Senior Member

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    That board looks dryer than a popcorn fart. 2018 guitar, sand on the board ? Even lightly ? No.
    And don't spend big bucks on some fretboard oil. A little mineral oul is all you need. I personally use bore oil, used for wood wind instruments but mineral oil works just fine. If it were mine, I'd remove the strings and oil the board first. Hog it on, let it sit and you'll see it soak into the wood after a minute wipe it all off good and restring.
    Don't let other people tell you "your guitar" is somehow messed up. The internet loves to find fault with your stuff.
     
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  7. Jeremiah

    Jeremiah The Worst Premium Member

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    Great news, OP, there is no shortage of those around here...:laugh2:
     
  8. Selendia

    Selendia Junior Member

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    Thanks, I already did that. I posted an update later on:

    What's your opinion about the nut and the width of the E and A slots?

     
  9. PierM

    PierM Certified Naysayer Premium Member

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    You guys are too quick jumping on the "you need a new nut" bandwagon.

    You can easily fix those slots filling them with a mix of bone dust (or any other nut material) and superglue, and then working the slots from scratch.

    If done properly, it will work perfect, you'll see nothing, and it will last forever....and more important, you avoid all the risks in changing a nut in a Gibson...
     
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  10. Les Paul John

    Les Paul John Senior Member

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    I’ve only found it to be temporary .... like fix-a-flat doesn’t repair a punctured tire. Might get away with it on the low E pictured but not the D or the G where it stresses the most because of Gibson’s design flaw we all love so much.

    I do luthier work and would never recommend to a customer to do that quick fix, might get him through a few gigs but that Nut has to be replaced.


    You can easily fix those slots filling them with a mix of bone dust (or any other nut material) and superglue, and then working the slots from scratch.

    “If done properly, it will work perfect, you'll see nothing, and it will last forever...” so will a new nut. Even more to the point a new nut won’t last ‘forever’ either.
     
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  11. Thundermtn

    Thundermtn Senior Member

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    What the OP is seeing is just tear out from plaining the board.

    It's not super pro to send one out with damage, to me that's on the edge of acceptable. It's not out of line with what you see on vintage examples though, it's the nature of rosewood.
     
  12. scozz

    scozz Senior Member

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    My opinion....I’d get a new nut installed by a qualified guitar tech.
     
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  13. kakerlak

    kakerlak Senior Member

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    Not sure why, with such a new guitar, but those two nut slots look almost double-width, where the other four look normal. I can't really think of a reason that would've happened or gone unnoticed in the process of slotting the nut or stringing the guitar at the factory, even if it's something that could've slipped by final/overall QC. Still, definitely something to fix. I wonder if Gibson would mail you a new, preslotted nut?
     
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  14. moreles

    moreles Senior Member

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    As for the original question, I think it's clear that you should have no worries about the fretboard. It's odd that it developed that uneven look, but it's easily dealt with. The nut is hacked, for sure, but whether or not it needs attention depends on whether or not you are hearing any buzzing or intonation problems. Sometimes even a hacked slot ends up presenting the proper bearing surfaces and requires no repair. The glue/powder fix is not a permanent on, IMO, but does have the huge benefit of focusing work only where needed, and avoids removing/reinstalling the nut, which almost everyone, techs included, does very poorly most of the time.
     
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  15. Selendia

    Selendia Junior Member

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    Thanks for all your answers!

    I measured the string spacing and that should be perfectly fine.
    I also recognized that the slots of the E and A strings are slightly too high (afaik the stings should be half the diameter embedded in the nut). Therefore I just made them slightly deeper.
    As there was no buzzing before and after that modification I decided to leave the nut as it is for now.

    I also talked to my dealer where I bought the guitar and he agreed to exchange the nut for free whenever I feel like getting a new one.
     
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  16. AJK1

    AJK1 Senior Member

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    Should have bought a Tokai....
     
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  17. wildhawk1

    wildhawk1 Senior Member

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    A new guitar that costs $2800 shouldn't need anything done to the nut or fretboard.

    If it can be done right on $400 instruments then there's no excuse.

     
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  18. charlie chitlins

    charlie chitlins Senior Member

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    Yes, the slots appear suprisingly wide, but it's nice to see the depth done properly with the string sitting proud of the nut.
    I often cut slots up to .006" wider than the string to allow for thicker strings and to reduce binding.
    With a Gibson headstock angle that puts a lot of down-pressure on the nut, that wide slot may not be a problem.
    It will not necessarily affect tuning or intonation.
    If the string skids around in the slot when you bend AND if that bothers you, then a new nut is in order.
    I wouldn't send one out like that, but if it was on my guitar and it worked satisfactorily, I'd keep it.
    I have an old Dano with huge nut slots (aluminum nut!) and sometimes the strings move in it when I bend.
    I consider it part of the funky/cheapo vibe of the guitar (clearly, something you don't want in a Les Paul!); but, most important, it doesn't get heard through the amp.
     
  19. moreles

    moreles Senior Member

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    Checking back into this thread, and looking at the pics again, I notice two odd aspects. The first is the area of lighter wood at the very end of the fretboard, running along the face of the nut. Oiling returned it to normal appearance. The second is the way the nut hangs out beyond the fretboard binding on both sides. These are little things and make no real difference, most likely, but do make me wonder if someone replaced the nut, or (more likely) if Gibson just did a crappy job on it to begin with. I think most of us do not care about these little things if the guitar plays well, in which case it's definitely better, by far, not to screw with things. If you're getting buzzing or other problems at the nut, then it's worth getting a new nut installed by someone who can do it well -- hopefully. Now... post pictures of the rest of the guitar so you can get a billion opinions about all the other stuff you should/shouldn't fix/not fix, worry about/ignore, upgrade/leave alone, relic/refinish/leave alone, keep/sell, etc., etc.
     
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  20. AJK1

    AJK1 Senior Member

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    This is why i own 4 Jap Tokai LP, they are superbly made and a joy to play
     
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