Gibson Les Paul 57 p/u with cycle hum

Discussion in 'Pickups' started by Campbell, Sep 23, 2017.

  1. Campbell

    Campbell Senior Member

    Messages:
    332
    Likes Received:
    367
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2016
    Okay, I'm not totally sure where I should be posting this question, so please don't give me any grief on that and excuse me if this has been asked before, since I wasn't able to find the answers...

    That out of the way, here's my issue:
    My 2016 Gibson Les Paul has a very annoying issue with cycle hum, even though it has humbuckers (57's). It stops most of this hum when my hand is resting on the bridge or stopbar, so I'm assuming it's a grounding issue(?).

    It's a lovely guitar with regards to everything else; exceptional build quality. That said, my Epiphone Les Pauls, Tribute Plus and White Lightning, do not have any such humming issues (I had to add that little point for all the Epiphone haters in the crowd).

    Can anyone give me any advice on my Gibson's annoying hum? I greatly appreciate any feedback.
     
  2. Campbell

    Campbell Senior Member

    Messages:
    332
    Likes Received:
    367
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2016
    "crickets"

    Hell, at least call me an idiot or something.
     
    morbidalex666 likes this.
  3. morbidalex666

    morbidalex666 Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,008
    Likes Received:
    286
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    The issue you mention is probably a grounding issue, yes.

    But is it really 60 cycle hum?
    Does it change or cut off when you move around?
    That's what 60 cycle hum should do.

    Back to the grounding thing.
    Does the noise sound way worse than your Epiphones?
    An A/B test is really appropriate here. The thiing is, many amps have their own grounding issues (usually by design).
    And if the amp is OK, then the wall plug might not be properly grounded, resulting in you acting like a quicker connection to ground than the wall plug.

    If the noise reduces when you touch the strings, that means the bridge-tailpiece-strings complex is well connected to each other and somewhat to ground.
    Is the grounding wire coming from the tailpiece well soldered?

    Does the noise stop when you touch the guitar cord plug?

    My first guess would be that the ground connection on the output jack is bad.
     
    Campbell likes this.
  4. morbidalex666

    morbidalex666 Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,008
    Likes Received:
    286
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    No, I won't.

    Because then I'd have to consider myself as completely bananas for waiting three months to sell one god damn pickup, just because I'm shipping from Greece.
     
    Campbell likes this.
  5. Campbell

    Campbell Senior Member

    Messages:
    332
    Likes Received:
    367
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2016
    First of, thanks for the kind and thoughtful reply. Secondly, I just called it "cycle hum" out of sheer ignorance. I had no idea how to describe the issue.

    I've several other guitars. Those with humbuckers do not share this trait the Gibson Les Paul is having. I also have several amps, so I know it's not the amps. I've used various electric outlets, so I've ruled that out, as well.

    The noise stops when I touch the bridge or stopbar. I've yet to open the back of the guitar. I love guitars and play them quite well, but, it would like me opening the hood to a car and trying to figure out anything more complex than checking the oil (I ain't a mechanic!). I guess I need to "pop the hood" and have a look. So that begs the question, "What/where should the ground wire be connected to for this to no longer be an issue?"

    Thanks again.
     
    morbidalex666 likes this.
  6. LtKojak

    LtKojak Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,881
    Likes Received:
    2,488
    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2009
    It is. If you bought the guitar new, you should retun it to be fixed in warranty.

    The reason is the grounding lead going from the bridge/tailpiece to the cavity is not making contact, ergo, not grounding the circuit. You can try reflowing the solder joint, normally found on the neck volume control, but if the grounding lead somehow got loose from the contact point with the bridge/tailpiece, re-flowing the solder joint won't make any good. Use a MultiMeter to look for continuity in different points of the circuit and see if you can find the breaking point.

    HTH,
     
  7. geddy

    geddy Senior Member

    Messages:
    597
    Likes Received:
    477
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2012
    If the hum reduces when you touch the bridge the ground wire is connected.

    The human body is not a good conductor under most circumstances. It can be a good antenna for noise though.

    Try playing in different rooms;. Is the hum present when you are not holding the guitar? There are plenty of explanations on the web. Just beware of internet 'truths'. A meter will confirm continuity of ground wiring . Just start at one end of the circuit and work through it.
     
  8. morbidalex666

    morbidalex666 Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,008
    Likes Received:
    286
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    The ground wire comes from the tailpiece and most usually soldered to the neck vol pot.
    In a typical Les Paul wiring situation all braided wires, backs of pots and the ground lug of the output jack should be well grounded.
    I'd start by checking the output jack.
    Especially if the noise is there no matter what pickup yoy play.

    Pics could help, but likely not.
     

Share This Page