Gibson ABR-1 question

Discussion in 'The Custom Shop' started by Have FUN, Apr 9, 2017.

  1. Have FUN

    Have FUN Senior Member

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    I switched the bridge on my Les Paul Tribute, I prefer ABR-1 bridge :)

    My question is : how to proceed to notch the saddles, what Tools should I use ? Thanks



    [​IMG]
     
  2. rlefty

    rlefty Premium Member

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  3. guitarjoem

    guitarjoem Double Platinum Supporter MLP Vendor

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    Yup. A dead blow hammer. Use the end of the string you are going to cut off. Lay it across the bridge in the correctly spaced spot and hit it with the hammer to create an indentation in the saddle. Works well.
     
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  4. oachs83

    oachs83 Senior Member

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    I recently asked the same thing. What they said also if needed take a small needle file to deepen you only want about half of the string seated. Remember to use an old string to rub back and forth in the new notch to remove any burs.
     
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  5. ARandall

    ARandall Senior Member

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    The hammer trick only works to locate the centre. You want a nice notch with a smooth clean end free of burrs so the string won't break nor be dulled by semi vibrations.
     
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  6. Riffster

    Riffster Senior Member

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    I recently notched replacement brass saddles on a Epi and a standard small hammer worked well, I do have a dead blow hammer but did not use it.

    A single blow on every string worked well, not sure if I simply go lucky or what.
     
  7. Have FUN

    Have FUN Senior Member

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    Done , thanks


    [​IMG]
     
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  8. jimbob137

    jimbob137 Senior Member

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    Best thing to do after tapping in your grooves is grab an under string radius gauge, probably will be a 12. And file your string slots using nut files to match the radius of the fret board and then smooth off the saddles and so that the strings are no more than half way into the grooves that you've made and leave the saddles ultra smoothed off and buffed so the strings wont bind.
     
  9. ashbass

    ashbass V.I.P. Member

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    I use the hammer trick too. So does gibson. But be carefull not to hit it too hard as you can bend the screw that moves the saddle. A bent screw can make it hard to turn. It will alsow raise and lower the saddle depending on where the screw is left.

    I got this off of a new gibson guitar. Replaced it.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. judson

    judson Senior Member

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    i was thinking exactly that when watching that video but i am amazed at the same time how well the hammer blow works...
     
  11. moreles

    moreles Senior Member

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    It's amazing what a POS the Gibson ABR-1 really is. It's a decent overall design, but the execution is sloppy and the materials are inferior. Still, we're mostly stuck with it if you prefer to keep things stock. Using the dead blow hammer to create an indentation to position the string is definitely the way to go. Deeper notches and the like are, 99.9% if the time, done in ways that cause buzzing and deadening of tone and sustain. We sometimes need to file deeper slots to match string height to neck radius, but when I encounter this situation, I reduce the overall height of an individual saddle by taking off thr excess height. Then I do the deadblow move rather than filing a bad, deep groove.
     
  12. ashbass

    ashbass V.I.P. Member

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    ^me too. Enough tap to keep them from moving on the plain strings and a little file to smooth out the grooves on the wound strings. I keep them on top.
     
  13. valvetoneman

    valvetoneman Senior Member

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    I've done it both ways and i won't be deepening any saddles ever unless I absolutely have to, it caused too many problems for me, I ended up chasing a citar type noise for ages on the high strings
     
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