Gary Moore

Discussion in 'The Cellar' started by moodyedge, Dec 4, 2009.

  1. Midnight Blues

    Midnight Blues Premium Member

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    :acoustic: :applause: :applause: :applause: :acoustic:

    Very nicely done Gemm!!!!! I'm sure Gary would have appreciated your arrangement.


    :cheers2:
     
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  2. Gemm

    Gemm Senior Member

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    Thanks! I didn't want him to be angry with me. :fingersx:
     
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  3. Justin_Case

    Justin_Case Senior Member

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    Very well done - I believe Gary would appreciate and take it as a compliment.
     
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  4. Midnight Blues

    Midnight Blues Premium Member

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    Can't see how he could be with how well you played it? Saying that you did justice to it would be a rather huge understatement.


    :cheers2:
     
  5. Emerald

    Emerald Senior Member

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    Back in 2011 a video popped up on You Tube featuring Gary Moore and band from the 1987 world tour playing in Japan.
    This is a version of "Over The Hills and Far Away recorded in Tokyo.
    There aren't many videos both official and unofficial from the '87 tour. Also the intro to this song he is shown playing whereas the Stockholm release has the opening credits being shown instead of Gary
    I saved it to my documents at the time and forgot all about it till the other day. I loaded it onto my You Tube channel and here it is!
    https://youtu.be/VfSv9CK_kpM
    Hope you enjoy it!
    Emerald
     
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  6. Midnight Blues

    Midnight Blues Premium Member

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    My God, those hairstyles in the '80s! :laugh2: :laugh2: :laugh2:
     
  7. phodg

    phodg Senior Member

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    One of my favorite Gary Moore clips. Back in the early days with Ian Paice (Deep Purple) on drums. I saw him tons of times between 82 and 89 ...

    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ioZY0uMjKws[/ame]
     
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  8. Midnight Blues

    Midnight Blues Premium Member

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    ^

    How's that for tone!?
     
  9. RandyRhoadsLesPaul

    RandyRhoadsLesPaul Senior Member

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    Hmm.. I forgot how I knew about Gary Moore; it wasn't through Peter Green...but I learned a lot about Gary Moore through Peter Green (the whole unique pickup on Green's LP which Moore bought from him and how Gary Moore rose to fame, etc.).

    Regardless, I love his solo playing and his playing with Thin Lizzy (who doesn't?)
     
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  10. Emerald

    Emerald Senior Member

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    Here is some light reading for you chaps, from my Facebook post on the Gary Moore page a collection of quotes from articles about Gary Moore and with some commentary from me:

    About being a 'guitar hero'...or not?

    "Well, it's something I'm labeled with, but if you listen to the albums they don't sound like the typical so-called 'guitar hero' album. All my stuff really revolves around the songs, and the guitar plays a part within those songs. You don't hear me do 10-minute guitar solos on an album - I do a couple of solo spots on stage which are about three minutes long, but I try really to contain the guitar within the framework of the song. The songs are much more important to me; they're things that I really feel for.
    The whole 'guitar hero' thing is so dated, anyway. I mean, it's expected of me to go out on stage and show off a lot of the time, whether I feel like it or not - and sometimes I just want to go up there and play the songs - but if I don't do it people are gonna go away disappointed."

    (Gary Moore - Sounds, 28th September 1985)

    David Talkin: Gary wrote the song ”Teenage Idol ” about this very subject. Gary was known for incorporating his solos within the context of the song. It became almost a trademark of a Gary Moore song that thematically the song incorporated a main melody and the solos or solo was directly based on that. A prime example would be the Moore/Carter composition ”Empty Rooms/So Far Away. Thematically the songs main melody builds and builds and when it becomes time for the solo it carries on that melody in a most hauntingly beautiful way. Gary was a master at that technique. Gary didn't have to prove how fast he could play, most times he had to hold himself back! When he switched to his blues/rock era, he self admitted that being fired up he may have slightly overplayed but to myself as a fellow guitarist I couldn't get enough! His second blues album ”After Hours” demonstrated his increased self control and his songs incorporated even more emotionally charged playing on tunes such as ”Separate Ways and The Story of the Blues” The resultant live video ”Live Blues” allowed Gary to really bring these songs in particular to life in a spectacular way. For example the extended intro to ”Seperate Ways” is a tour de force of brilliantly performed textures, from whisper soft to screaming intensity. There will never be a guitarist like Gary any moore....sadly. But he has left us a rich legacy for future generations of fans.

    About his own playing.

    "People ask me 'how do you play' - and I don't know how I play. I don't think in terms of keys and chords when I'm playing; I'm at that stage now where I just know that neck and something else takes over when I play. Like if I was playing and you were trying to hold a conversation with me I just wouldn't hear a word you were saying - it's hard to describe. I get up there on stage and the whole world just ceases to exist apart from the music."

    (Gary Moore - Beat Instrumental, January 1979)

    David Talkin Though Gary knew musical theory back from his Colloseum II days. I loved it when he would tune a string whilst playing as i had watched him do countless times!:)

    About the writing and recording of Wild Frontier album.

    "I took about six months for that. I started more than a year ago with the title song. But we didn't start recording until the beginning of last summer. In between we played the Open Air Festival with Queen. We were also in Germany. So we had to split the recording into three sections - one part before the festival, one part after - and then at Christmastime we had to go into studio again, to complete the album.
    In the beginning we were working with drummer Gary Ferguson. But he had to take off, because we decided to use machines instead. I wrote these songs with the help of computers. At home I have an eight-track and a simple drum machine, and the rhythms I produced with these were the basis for all my songs. When we were in the studio with a real drummer we wanted to change, but it didn't sound perfect enough. I kept hearing these small mistakes, minimal to be sure, but I couldn't endure it, and I sent the drummer home. He really felt somewhat **** upon."

    (Gary Moore - Guitar World, September 1987)

    David Talkin When Gary toured with Eric Singer on drums in his lineup, it really 'humanized' the songs. Drum machines are great but are no substitute for the real thing. The Linn Drum system which Gary used sounded great, but once the songs were toured live they really came to life. In particular "Over The Hills and Far Away" the live intro and the one used on the remix, really brought out the dynamics of the song. A song like "The Loner" needed a 'real' drummer with Gary's extended improvisations. What many people seemed to fail to realize is on the last tour of 2010 how Gary had adapted the Wild Frontier songs to his Les Paul fixed bridge guitar. He utilized his brilliant vibrato with his fingers to substitute for the Floyd Rose tremolo system on the recordings and the tour in 1987. In my personal opinion Gary improved on many of the songs from that album by the time of the 2010 tour. By the last leg of the tour, the additional gigs in the Ukraine Gary was at his top form both vocally and instrumentally. And what a band with Gary Husband, Jonathon Noyce and the venerable Neil Carter they were a formidable lineup. It makes me happy in a sad kind of way that at least Gary's last performances were so good an he gave all and I will always love and remember him for that.

    About playing the solos of the Still Got The Blues album live on stage.

    "I know it's going to be very different when we take this album on stage. In the past I've fallen into the trap of working solos out if I like them on record, and then reproducing them live. It's not going to be like that. It's going to be like the old days where every night you go out and come up with a new solo. That's back to square one for me, but it's a great challenge. And it makes life interesting, shall we say."

    (Gary Moore - Making Music, No. 49, April 1990)

    About the After The War album.

    "The reason it is different is because basically we didn't just want to make the same record again - you know, sticking to the tried and tested formula. So we decided to go in a more rock direction this time, playing more guitar, and make it different from the last one, so that we weren't just doing Wild Frontier mark two, as it were.
    Also, I think a lot of people were expecting another Wild Frontier, which is another good reason not to do it! and it's no challenge to me just to do the same thing over and over again. I'd rather take a risk. I took a big risk with Wild Frontier, really, because I'd never done anything like that before, and it paid off. So I'm doing the same and taking a risk this time."

    (Gary Moore - Kerrang!, No. 225, February 1989

    About playing together with Albert Collins.

    "The intensity that Albert plays with is quite similar to a lot of rock guitar, and you don't often find that in the blues. That's one of the things that attracted me to Albert when I first heard him. I just thought, 'Oh there's so much fire in it!'. I really wanted to work with him 'cause I thought that could work well.
    Sometimes, when I've tried to work with other players, their style has been so minimalist that it's very hard to fit what I do with what they do. I have got a very aggressive style and there are people I would never even try to play with. I mean, I could never play with Robert Cray - his style is so clean and laid back - but I think my playing and Albert's playing have a bit more common."

    (Gary Moore - The Guitar Magazine, Vol. 3/3, May 1993)

    David Talkin Albert Collins was my favourite duet with Gary. They toured together twice. Cold Cold Feeling was the best song they did together live imo

    About being on the charts. Just before releasing Falling In Love With You as a single.

    "I'll be honest about it. I look at the charts and if there are still things in there I can relate to, why can't I have a song that's up there? Why can't I have a place in the charts, because I think we deserve one as much as anybody else. I'll try and beat 'em all at their own game!
    We've got good quality material, but it has to get played on the radio. And if the single we put out had been played I'm sure it would have been a hit. We just haven't had that opportunity."

    (Gary Moore - Kerrang!, No. 32, January 1983
    David Talkin John Sloman made Gary realize that he needed to do the lead vocals,thanks John!:)

    About George Harrison.

    "We're really just friends. He certainly has been a great influence on me, in my early years as a guitarist. He is still one of the world's most under-rated guitarists - especially by himself. He's very humble about his own ability, but he's a great guitar player. He's one of the best."

    (Gary Moore - Rhythms, No. 16, July 1993)

    About how Phil Lynott's death inspired the writing of the Wild Frontier album.

    "The whole period was kind of strange, you know, because you don't get over something like that overnight obviously and in fact, it was an ironic thing in the way that his death inspired me to write the album. So although I was very emotionally distraught at the time, I was very depressed and stuff, it pushed me, 'cos I thought 'what would Phil have wanted me to do'? There were all these kind of things in my mind at the time and I felt that I'd like the album to be something that Phil would have been proud to be part of. I wrote a lot of the music with him in mind."

    (Gary Moore - Juke, No. 645, 5th September 1987)
    David Talkin Gary never really got over Phillip's death I felt. Blood of Emeralds told their story moore closely. I think the last tour in 2010 Phil was in everyones hearts again, no one's more than Gary. There is a bittersweet sadness to Gary's affect on that tour and the second tour at the end in the Ukraine, the performances from Gary are absolutely incredible. Both his guitar playing and singing was so emotionally charged, I enjoy watching them, but it is an experience that is also very sad to me. it's as if Gary felt it may have been his last performances. I have listened to and read everything about Gary Moore since 1982 and felt close as I could have got to him. Gary always said how he felt was expressed in his music. That is true but there is more to his story. No other guitar player gave as much emotion as Gary did, it's as if his soul was plugged into his guitar. He became a very fine singer as well through necessity but playing and singing is a rare talent. I miss Gary every day, I can hardly imagine how his family feel......
    Gary's birthday is coming up on the 4th of April.

    Emerald
     
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  11. DifteR

    DifteR Junior Member

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    Happy birthday Gary.
     
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  12. Midnight Blues

    Midnight Blues Premium Member

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    Yup, Happy Birthday Gary, we're still missing you.
     
  13. Emerald

    Emerald Senior Member

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  14. Gemm

    Gemm Senior Member

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    Although I personally don't like Strat and I preferred to see Gary with Les Pauls, that Strat did sound great.
     
  15. Midnight Blues

    Midnight Blues Premium Member

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    Now that's cool!
     
  16. Midnight Blues

    Midnight Blues Premium Member

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  17. Midnight Blues

    Midnight Blues Premium Member

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    Couldn't get it to imbed for some reason?
     
  18. judson

    judson Senior Member

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    the tone from those strats is 99% gary , not takin anything away from the strats but gary could get a tone out of a broom if he chose :lol:
    thank you for those links and vids

    amazing as usual
     
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  19. Midnight Blues

    Midnight Blues Premium Member

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    From Guitar Player:

    Gary Moore

    [​IMG]

    Gary Moore’s Guitars and Amps Head to Auction This Month

    BY GP Editors
    June 7, 2016

    A trove of guitars and amps owned by the late Gary Moore is coming to auction on June 29.

    More than 35 guitars and amplifiers from the collection of the late Irish guitarist will be offered at Bonhams Entertainment Memorabilia sale, which will take place at the auctioneer’s location in Knightsbridge, London.

    The Belfast-born star is famed for gracing the lineup of the great British rock band Thin Lizzy, as well as Colosseum II, and the original Skid Row group. Moore’s talents extended across a breadth of musical styles, from mainstream hard rock, for which he was most famous, to blues and jazz-rock, genres in which he produced several albums.

    “Before his death, Gary Moore had amassed an incredible collection of instruments,” says Stephen Maycock, Bonhams Entertainment Memorabilia consultant specialist. “Some 35 guitars, as well as a selection of vintage amplifiers, will be offered at auction for the first time in Bonhams Entertainment Memorabilia sale. As you’d expect from such a great musician, there’s a lot of interesting guitars in the collection, including several Gibson Les Paul models.”

    Leading the collection is a 1963 Fender Stratocaster, estimated at $12,000–17,000. The guitar was a gift from the late Claude Nobs, founder of the Montreux Jazz Festival. It can be seen on live footage of the Fleadh festival in Finsbury Park, London in 2001, and the Blues for Jimi DVD in late 2007.

    Also featured is a Fritz Brothers Roy Buchanan Bluemaster guitar, estimated at $3,600–5,100. Moore ordered the guitar after borrowing a similar instrument from George Harrison, who was his friend and neighbor in the Oxfordshire town of Henley-on-Thames. Moore used Harrison’s guitar when recording a track on the 1989 album After the War, and he later decided to purchase his own to use for live performances.

    Other highlights from the Gary Moore collection include:
    • Warwick Thumb Bass guitar, 1987, estimated at $1,500–2,200
    • National Model 1104 Town and Country guitar, circa 1957, estimated at $1,700–2,200
    • Fender Twin amplifier, 1950s, estimated at $7,300–8,700
    • Gibson Les Paul ’59 Standard Historic Reissue guitar, 2004, estimated at $3,600–4,400
    • Gibson Les Paul Standard Hot Rod 58 guitar, 2008, estimated at $2,900–4,400
    • Fender Vibroverb amplifier, 1964, estimated at $4,400–5,800
    • Gibson Firebird 1 guitar, 1964, estimated at $12,00–15,000
    • Gary Moore Tribute Model Les Paul Standard Initial Prototype, 2012, estimated at $3,600–4,400
    • Gibson Les Paul Standard VOS Collector’s Choice No.1, 2011, estimated at $5,800–7,300

    Additional information can be found at the auctioneer’s website. For more information about Bonhams’ Entertainment Memorabilia sale, visit Bonhams.com.

    We’ve featured a selection of the guitars and amps below and over the next pages, along with their descriptions from the auction catalog.

    [​IMG]

    1963 “Claude Nobs” Fender Stratocaster
    Estimated: $12,000–17,000

    Body with non-original, clear-lacquered natural finish, three Kinman AVN pickups, three-ply laminated scratchplate, three volume/tone knobs and five-way selector, re-fretted rosewood fingerboard with dot markers, in rectangular, plush-lined Fender tweed case with various components. A gift to Gary from Montreux Jazz Festival founder Claude Nobs in 1998. Seen on the live footage of the TV broadcast from the Fledah in Finsbury Park, London in 2001, and the Blues for Jimi DVD, filmed in London in late 2007.

    [​IMG]

    1950s Fender Twin,
    Estimated: $7,300–8,700

    Model 5C8, serial 0322, tweed case, two Jensen Alnico 5 12-inch speakers, top control panel with four Instrument/Microphone sockets and four control knobs. Acquired in 1991. The tweed had been replaced prior to this and the handle is a possible replacement also.

    [​IMG]

    1964 Gibson Firebird 1
    Estimated: $12,000–15,000

    Inked serial on back of headstock, 153314, “reverse“” mahogany body with sunburst finish, with replacement Seymour Duncan mini-humbucking bridge pickup, volume and tone bonnet knobs, three-ply laminated scratchplate, unbound rosewood fingerboard with dot markers, banjo tuners on treble side of headstock, in hard, rectangular plush-lined case with original pickup and replaced volume pot and Gibson strap. Bought in 1994 for the short-lived BBM project, featuring Moore with the former Cream rhythm section of bassist Jack Bruce and drummer Ginger Baker.

    [​IMG]

    1965 Gibson Melody Maker
    Estimated: $1,700–2,600

    Serial 287759 on back of headstock, double-cutaway body with red finish, single oblong pickup with black plastic cover, two black bonnet knobs mounted onto scratchplate which surrounds pickup, unbound rosewood fingerboard with dot markers, narrow headstock, in faux skin card case.

    [​IMG]

    2007 Gibson ’57 Les Paul Goldtop VOS Darkback Reissue
    Estimated: $3,600–4,400

    Serial 771413 ink-stamped on back of headstock, bound body with carved top, four gold bonnet volume/tone knobs, three-way selector, two humbuckers, bound rosewood fingerboard with trapezoid markers, Gibson Deluxe tuners, in shaped, hard Gibson plush-lined case with strap. Used on the 2007 album Close As You Get and seen in live performances on the corresponding tour.

    [​IMG]

    Circa 1991 Fritz Brothers “Roy Buchanan Bluesmaster”
    Estimated: $3,600–5,100

    Telecaster-style, bound body with three-tone sunburst finish, three EMG pickups, five-way selector and volume/tone knobs, three-ply laminated pearloid scratchplate, unbound fingerboard, headstock with Roy Buchanan “signature,” Sperzel tuners, in hard, rectangular plush-lined case with strap. Ordered from the Fritz Brothers workshop after Gary had borrowed a similar model from his Henley neighbor George Harrison for use on one track of 1989’s After the War album. It was used to play that track live and for some tracks on the After Hours album.

    [​IMG]

    1964 Fender Vibroverb
    Estimated: $4,400–5,800

    Serial A03015, black tolex with blackface, one 15-inch speaker, front panel with Normal/Vibrato sockets, nine control knobs, 240/110 volt transformer bolted into chassis, complete with flight case.

    [​IMG]

    1989 Takamine CP-132SC Electric-Acoustic
    Estimated: $1,300–1,700

    Serial 89120380. Natural finish cedar top with rosewood back, sides and fingerboard, in hard, shaped plush-lined Takamine case. Used for the track “Nothing’s the Same” on 1992 album After Hours and for “With Love (Remember)” from the 1994 album Ballads and Blues.

    [​IMG]


    2011 Gibson Les Paul Standard VOS Collector’s Choice No.1
    Estimated: $5,800–7,300

    Artist Proof #3 in silver pen to back of headstock, bound, carved, two-piece flame maple top with fine figuring, mahogany body and neck, four gold bonnet volume/tone control knobs (two with caps), two humbuckers, three-way selector, bound rosewood neck with trapezoid markers, Sperzel tuners, in hard, shaped lined Gibson case with completed checklist/COA/tags, with original delivery box.

    [​IMG]


    1957 National Model 1104 Town and Country
    Estimated: $1,700–2,200

    Serial X74338 stamped on plate to back of headstock, bound maple body with natural finish, back with plastic covering, two pickups, nickel-plated hardware, lower scratchplate with six volume/tone knobs and selector, bolt-on neck with bound rosewood fingerboard and parallelogram markers, in hard, shaped lined Stone Case Co. case with strap. Featured in a photo shoot for promo pictures in 2008, for the Bad for You Baby album, and used on flyers and posters for live shows in Europe during this period.

    [​IMG]

    1971 Marshall Model 2022 Lead 20 amplifier and cabinet,
    Estimated: $2,200–2,900

    Amp serial 0864C, black tolex with vinyl cover, and a Marshall 4x10 speaker cabinet, serial 38774, black tolex with Marshall logo to grille.

    [​IMG]

    2007 Gibson Firebird V
    Estimated: $2,600–2,900

    Serial 010870430 and Made in U.S.A. impressed to back of headstock, natural-finish reverse body with Zebrawood wings, seven-piece neck-thru-body construction, four black bonnet volume/tone knobs, three-way selector, chrome hardware, bound rosewood fingerboard with trapezoid markers, 'banjo' tuners, in Gibson plush-lined, hard rectangular case with strap, lead and owner's manual, from an edition of 400.
     
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  20. judson

    judson Senior Member

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    is it just me or do the estimates seem low?....hell there are a few that if there was a "buy it now" button to click, i would have owned a few of these this morning and would be selling off some of my guitars

    i do like that the 64 firebird, that would be my first click

    and for $3k i would click the 07 also...

    ok and the 57 national..

    and the 65 melody maker

    ok im done ...where is the checkout counter???....oh wait the 2011 VOS, screw it what's another $10k...ok im really done now
     
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