[Friends] I'll be there for you

Discussion in 'Guitar Lessons' started by rem22, Jul 30, 2014.

  1. rem22

    rem22 Senior Member

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    Hi. I did not find a thread on this, sorry if I missed it.

    I'm looking for a _good_ tutorial or guitar lesson on how to play this cool song from the Rembrandts, since I'm a huge fan of Friends. Yes, I was born in 1980 ;)

    I found a few tabs, one or two youtube lesson, but nothing great so far.
    You know, with the solos etc... I found 2 acoustic versions on YT but it does not sound like the original (more stumming, no palm mute)

    Thanks in advance.
     
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  2. rabidhamster

    rabidhamster Senior Member

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    I've never seen one either but the main riffs from the show are easy to get if you use a slow downer.
    Never bothered to learn anymore than that because girls don't care about the solo, great pop song though
     
  3. rem22

    rem22 Senior Member

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    Yes I love that sound, it always reminds me off some Friends scenes.
    I really like this show, and since I don't have to seduce girls anymore (got a mommy and 2 little daughters at home) I'd like to be able to play it entirely, from the intro riff (that I already know) to the last note.

    god I hope some MLP members will help me on this.
    I already know that most of the verse is in A, with what seems to be :

    D DU with a palm mute right after the U.
    A G chord sometimes.

    But I miss the chorus and the bridge/solo.

    Nobody here has a good ear and knowledge of this song ? Thx

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SCQGnVrTsAM

    I'm also looking for a backing track
     
  4. SteveC

    SteveC Village Elder V.I.P. Member

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  5. FoodSexMusic

    FoodSexMusic Banned

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    Well I know how I feel when no one bothers to answer my threads!!! So I'll make a little bit of an effort

    My first time hearing the middle 8, which starts as early as 1:30. Interestingly, having not listened too closely, I would have presumed it started on a C, as lots of middle 8s involve a chord change down a minor 3rd(from the A in this case). But it actually start on a D

    The last chord of the m8(F#m) stops being played at 1:52, and it changes to some other chord(I'd like to know) with an Ab note lyric of 'yeah'!!!!

    Then at the end of 1:55, it goes back to the A, D, E chords underneath some sort of easy-ish guitar solo.

    Another interesting change at the end of 2:00 ..........................
     
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  6. JonR

    JonR Senior Member

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    Which is a very common modulation in a bridge.
    You're right a minor 3rd down is also common, but that would be to F# (minor), not C ;).
    (Changes to F# major and C major - from A major - do occur, but are a little less common than D major or F# minor.)
    It's an E chord (the note is G# ;)).
    Strictly speaking they're out of the bridge by that point - the vocal extends a couple of bars into the following (instrumental) section. At least, that's how I hear it:

    Bridge (16 bars)
    1:30
    |D |D |D |D |
    |F#m |F#m |F#m |A |
    |Bm |Bm |A |A |
    |G |F#m |E |D E |

    1:50 (16 bar break section, vocal continues for first 2 bars: "you..... yeah")
    |F#m |D |E |E |
    |A |D |E |E |
    |F#m |D |E |E |
    |A |D |E |E |

    2:10
    |G... (pre-chorus repeat)
    (etc)
    See above... that's the 2nd F#m of the "break" section, a repeat of the one that was under the "you" after the end of the bridge.

    IOW, the way they continue the bridge vocal for 18 bars blurs the natural boundary between these two 16-bar sections. Clever ;). (A very Beatles-type thing to do.)
     
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  7. FoodSexMusic

    FoodSexMusic Banned

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    I meant to say up! Maybe that's common too.

    I've no idea what that means unfortunately, and I doubt most do too.
     
  8. JonR

    JonR Senior Member

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    I mean that the stock length for sections in songs is 8 or 16 bars.
    The vast majority of old jazz standards and pre-1960s pop songs adhered to that formula: typically the 32-bar AABA format (8+8+8+8). (As you probably know, it's where the phrase "middle 8" comes from.)
    If they weren't 32-bar AABA, they'd probably be 12-bar blues (which was very common in 1950s rock'n'roll of course) - 3 lines of 4 bars each.

    The Beatles were (pretty much) the first composers to start breaking that format down and opening it up: stretching or shortening the standard chunks, for surprise or dramatic effect. A typical early example was I Saw Her Standing There, with its 10-bar bridge, stretched to allow them to hold that falsetto "mi-i-i-i-ne", and raise its pitch (while the chord fell): all those screaming girls picked up instinctively on the irresistible tension that created.

    By the time the Rembrandts came along, of course, such tricks were now well-worn formulas themselves - even while the old "8+8" duple format still feels "natural". So the effect of allowing the vocal of the bridge to run over an extra 2 bars is milder, but still helps the song sound less "four-square" than its chord structure is. As I say, it's a mild effect, but the implication of it is "hey I've got so much to say I can't quite fit it all in!" - ie it contributes a sense of enthusiasm and ebullience.
    (The song's already very "up", of course, but - by the time the end of the bridge is approaching - risks sounding a bit rigid and too formulaic. Allowing the vocal to "bleed" over into the instrumental break - especally in that high register - helps push the energy that little bit higher at that point, so the solo sounds like a release, as much as a breather.)
     
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  9. rem22

    rem22 Senior Member

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    Wow I did not notice the new answers.... Thank you all, gonna try your tips ! Thanks again, that's very kind of you all !
     

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