First Burst - Here We Go

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Telzilla, Feb 13, 2018.

  1. Caretaker

    Caretaker Senior Member

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    You can wet sand to blend it.
     
  2. Telzilla

    Telzilla Member

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    Will that work even though I've got a coat of vintage amber, a coat of the orangeish color and then another coat of the vintage amber on top? Also, it's totally dry at this point.

    Thoughts?
     
  3. pinefd

    pinefd V.I.P. Member Premium Member V.I.P. Member

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    I don't have much experience doing hand rubbed bursts, and the experience I do have wasn't too successful...so I can't really offer any advice on how to fix the transition. All I'll add is that you do need to fix it somehow, or start over, because it just doesn't look too good the way it is now. And I have a feeling that if you were to add some coats of nitro on top of that, the way it is, it would just accentuate the problem transition areas.

    Big help, aren't I? :rolleyes:


    Frank
     
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  4. Caretaker

    Caretaker Senior Member

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    Wet sanding shouldwork. Ive done many burst finishes and i wet sand between each coat until satisfied.
    Use 2000 grit. Soak it in a glass of water until soft.
     
  5. emoney

    emoney Senior Member

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    Personally, I think you need a middle color to get that hard line out. I always start with the base, like you
    did say the Amber, then I mix in the outer color into about half the remaining Amber to get my
    "transition" coat, then I use the outer color. I actually go so far as to using 4 different colors for my
    bursts. Having said that, I think by using each color into the next one when mixing it, it makes for a
    better transition.
     
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  6. ARandall

    ARandall Senior Member

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    Rub in some very diluted yellow dye on that border with swirls.
     
  7. Telzilla

    Telzilla Member

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    Here's where we are at this point, after a mix of wetsanding, 000 Scotch brite pad, and a couple more coats of various mixes of dye.
    3.14.JPG

    Like I said, I think I'm going to spray some tinted reranch clear on it before clearcoats. Frankly, I'd like a little more orangey color on the edges, but I'm concerned about blending it in.
     
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  8. Telzilla

    Telzilla Member

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    I just keep fooling around with it, I guess this is a little darker
    3.19.jpg
     
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  9. fretman_2

    fretman_2 Senior Member

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    Looks much better! Clear coat will bring that out even more I think.

     
  10. Telzilla

    Telzilla Member

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    Working on the headstock and I have a question: what do you do if the thing is really shiny but still has scratches. Here's a picture:
    Headstock 2.JPG

    So after many coats of lacquerr, I let it sit for about two weeks, then wetsanded with 1500 and 2000. Since then I buffed with medium and fine Stewmac rubbing compounds. As you can see, it's very reflective, but there are still some fine sctratches. Not sure they come through on the photo, and they're certsinly not very pronounced, but I'd rather not have them there. Especially when I get to the body.

    So, what would you suggest? Just keep buffing with the fine compound?
     
  11. pshupe

    pshupe Senior Member

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    Meguiers swirl remover is good for removing very fine scratches.

    Cheers Peter.
     
  12. Telzilla

    Telzilla Member

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    I have some Meguiar's scratchX, this stuff:
    scratchx.jpg

    Is that what you're referring to? Or is there something finer?
     
  13. pshupe

    pshupe Senior Member

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    I have used the swirl remover and it works really well. You'd have to do a little investigating to see whether what you have is similar or possibly a different grit. You could always try a small patch on the back. It does say fine scratch remover but I can't say for sure whether that product is the finest they sell.

    Regards Peter.
     
  14. Telzilla

    Telzilla Member

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    I just did a little research, and it's not. First off Meguiars has a LOT of products and the numbering doesn't appear to make any sense.

    The original ScratchX was very fine (ie, low abrasive), but apparently that product has been discontinued, and the stuff I have, ScratchX 2.0, is more abrasive. Some of the meguiars stuff has a handy little arrow on the bottle to tell abrasiveness. I guess I'll go with that. For example:
    Swirl.jpeg
     
  15. emoney

    emoney Senior Member

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    If, by chance, you've jumped the gun, so-to-speak, (I've been there/done that), you may find that the
    remaining scratches are because you left them there during the progression of sandpaper. Did you start
    with the 1500? Also, and you may have said somewhere I just missed it, but what are you buffing with,
    a wheel, hand buffer?
     
  16. Telzilla

    Telzilla Member

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    Yes, I started with the 1500, then moved on to the 2000.

    I started the buffing by hand (old cut up t shirt), but I also used these things I bought from Stewmac:

    buffer.png

    You put them in a hand drill. I have two, separate ones for Medium compound and fine compound. I Got some Meguiars #9 over lunch (the stuff from above), and I'll try that by hand and see what that does.
     
  17. emoney

    emoney Senior Member

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    The minor grit may be why you're still seeing the scratches. I usually start with 400 and work my way up
    to 2000, even though I'm pretty convinced that I'm done at 1600. Routines and all. Each progression
    of higher grit is there to remove the scratches left by the paper before it. If there's scratches significant
    enough to see from 5-6' away, then I'm not so sure you can get those out, especially by hand.

    As a tip; I've had great success buffing out my finishes using an inexpensive Automotive Buffer that I
    purchase from one of the Big Box Stores. I think it was less than $30.00 and it's still going strong.
     
  18. Telzilla

    Telzilla Member

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    I see what you're saying, but if I never sanded below 1500, what made the scratches? The fact that they're a little bit circular makes me think they were from some stuff that got caugt under the sponges. I haven't had a chance to get out the swirl remover yet, but I'm hoping it will do the trick. Don't think you would see anything from 5'.

    I have a cheapo buffer- I think mine's from Harbor Freight. I'll probably break that out for the body.
     
  19. ARandall

    ARandall Senior Member

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    When you sand initially you can often press down hard and create deeper scratches. Plus any folding of the paper or if its not been soaked can lead to deeper marks.
    1500 is very light to start sanding with. I rarely even with many years have a smooth enough top surface to start at 1200 for the final buffing. The initial grit should be such that you can effortlessly get it level in a short time.
     
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  20. Skyjerk

    Skyjerk Meatbomb Silver Supporter

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    I start at 800 myself
     

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