First Burst - Here We Go

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Telzilla, Feb 13, 2018.

  1. pshupe

    pshupe Senior Member

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    Generally I put everything on and drill all holes and test fit before finish. You do not want to be drilling or pressing in bushings after finish because if you dent something or mess up something you are screwing up your finish. That is why I recommended putting everything together before finish. It's hard to take out scratches, dents, glue squeeze out etc etc from a finished guitar. Looks nice.

    Cheers Peter.
     
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  2. Telzilla

    Telzilla Member

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    Thanks again. I think I'll glue up the neck and test fit everything before spraying lacquer on the top. Once you get the ferrules in for the posts, they're in, correct? So after the test fit, you can remove the posts, but not the ferrules themselves?
     
  3. Brewdude

    Brewdude Senior Member

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    You can remove the tailpiece and bridge bushings with a tool after you have pressed them in, not too hard to make one at the hardware store or Stew Mac et al sell them. To stop stuff from getting in there I think I've heard of some people using bees wax but I just balled up some bits of paper towel and stuck them in there so no lacquer got on the threads, don't worry about it getting on the top of the bushing.

    The back color looks really nice! I struggled to get the rid shade and consistency when I did mine but that product looks good!
     
  4. Telzilla

    Telzilla Member

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    Thanks. I'm really pleased. This stuff seems pretty idiot proof.
     
  5. pshupe

    pshupe Senior Member

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    I usually slightly recess these so that they can stay in and do not affect wet sanding or finishing.

    Regards Peter.
     
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  6. Telzilla

    Telzilla Member

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    Still working on the back. I've now got two clear coats on, probably will do one more. It's looking good. Not gonna be a smooth coat, definitely shows open grain, which is cool with me.

    As the stuff cures (48 hours between coats is recommended), my brain is turning toward my approach to the burst. I got Guitar Finishing Step By Step from StewMac. It's very detailed and seems like a good resource. One of the best things it has is color pages in the middle with various stain concentrations and mixes. I've got Stewmac Vintage Amber and Cherry Red dyes and I'll be thinning with denatured alcohol.

    Here's a page that shows various concentrations of different dyes- lemon yellow, Vintage Amber, orange, cherry red, and red maghogany(vintage amber is the second column from left):
    Vint.JPG

    And here's a page showing various blends of dyes (vintage amber and red are shown in the second row from the top):
    blend.png

    So my current thought is to first dye the entire thing with some diluted vintage amber (maybe second from the top, which is 2 parts thinner to 1 part standard mix), then busrt the edges with something darker witha bit more orange (maybe third from the left on the second row down, which is 90% amber / 10% cherry). I thought a little about doing something darker on the very edges (maybe straight vintage amber dye), but I think I'll hold off on that for now- I keep reading that less and simpler is better.

    Who knows, maybe I'll just decide the diluted amber is the way to go with no burst at all.

    Love to hear what people think.
     
  7. Telzilla

    Telzilla Member

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    So, the back is done to my satisfaction
    Back.jpg
    Now I'm starting to practice sunbursting (again, I'm hand rubbing dye reduced in denatured alcohol):
    Practice.jpg
    I found these veneers at Cleveland Tool and Machine - what a cool place. The one on the right is untreated.

    Everything I've read says use less color than you think you need, cuz the clearcoats will darken things considerably. I think these colors are close (sorry, it's a terrible picture- my bench is too well lit for sexy guitpix):
    Template.jpg

    I am nervous about fading the borders, and I'm wondering if Imaybe want a third, darker color for the edges.

    Any thoughts / tips / brutal criticisms?
     
  8. Telzilla

    Telzilla Member

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    head stock now flat black (I just had some flat black Krylon around). Decals and coats of clear to come.
    Headstock.JPG

    Also, bumping to see if anyone has any ideas on blending in the burst without lightening the area of the blend.
     
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  9. emoney

    emoney Senior Member

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    There's a great thread around here about hand-rubbed burst finishes by "Gatorpayne" (at least I think
    that's correct) that might be a great read before you get started.
     
  10. Telzilla

    Telzilla Member

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  11. madmusicltd

    madmusicltd Senior Member

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  12. Telzilla

    Telzilla Member

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    Doing more stuff. Headstock:
    Peghead.JPG

    This will get many coats of clear. That's actually a vinyl sticker I got on Etsy, so I'm not sure about sanding the clear. It's pretty thick. Maybe it will be the sought after "orange peel" headstock.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2018
  13. Telzilla

    Telzilla Member

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    I went back and forth on this next step, but I decided to take the plunge. I applied a coat of dark stain and wiped off after about a minute to bring out the stripes. I'm not a huge fan of the superzebra look, so I was undecided. Before:
    plain.JPG

    After:
    dyed.JPG
     
  14. Telzilla

    Telzilla Member

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    That was a little too dark for me, so I sanded a bit with some 400 grit
    Sanded.JPG

    I also got a tiny blob of Vintage amber on it because I left the body on my workbench while mixing dye (lower right of above pic), cuz I'm a godamned idiot. Hopefully that won't show up too much. I am very much not a pro. If it sucks I'll just say it's a relic.

    I think I'm gonna do vintage amber soon. Question: Do I need to do all the colors of the burst at the same time, or can I do vintage amber, let it dry for a day, then do the burst color? I'm still nervous about blending/feathering the border.
     
  15. Mattsta

    Mattsta Senior Member

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    Top carve looks lovely
     
  16. emoney

    emoney Senior Member

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    Don't worry about the Amber you got on the top because it'll be eaten up with the burst.
    Yes, do one color at a time. Oh, and just so you're not surprised, some of those Zebra Stripes will
    come back up with each coat of any color, including the AMber. That's grain getting raised, ftr, so you
    don't necessarily have to use a dark color. Now, if you're "Flame Enhancing" then the norm is to dye
    the top with a dark color and sand back because the flame will be the only thing retaining the color
    at that point.
     
  17. Telzilla

    Telzilla Member

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    I totally agree. It's got some good recurve.

    Got the dilute vintage amber on:
    vint amber.jpg

    I guess it's burst time....
     
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  18. pshupe

    pshupe Senior Member

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    Are you going to set the neck before your clear coats? I would have set it already TBH. You want to make sure the bridge and tailpiece are in the correct spot and drill all your holes before finish, IMO anyway. The more you have to do after it has finish the more chance you will mar the finish and it is tough to fix after that's for sure.

    Cheers Peter.

    PS - looks awesome BTW
     
  19. kasu

    kasu Senior Member

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    Great looking top!
     
  20. Telzilla

    Telzilla Member

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    My plan is to attach the neck after the dye but before the clear.

    Not sure I want to share these publicly, but who cares. Here's the orange on (tried to do some feathering, to mixed results, which is why the border area is so wet:
    wet.jpg

    Here it is after drying out and in natural light:
    dry.JPG

    Like I said, my feathering was hit and miss. For one thing, I'm pretty sure this will get a pickguard. I thought it could use a little mellowing, so I did another coat of the dilute vintage amber over the whole thing:
    coat 2.jpg

    I wish the border was a bit more subtle, but It looks better. I can't decide if I should just leave it alone, or do the very edge in a dark color. Probably smarter just to stop. I have some tinted Reranch clear somewhere. I might do a coat of that before the lacquer coats
     

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